Blues win after horror injury

first_imgOxford 1Royal Navy 0Blue was the colour as Oxford met the Navy at Iffley Road on Monday. Only the sky, a pale grey pall, failed to turn a matching shade, as swirling rain and a breezy wind joined force to inhibit Oxford’s passing game, though the home side eventually triumphed with a 1-0 win.Just five days earlier, the season opener against Loughborough III had fallen decidedly flat as the game was abandoned after five minutes. If expectation and hope were the predominant emotions for the Blues at the start of the Loughborough match then these were soon replaced with expectation and hope of a very different kind with players crossing their fingers for their injured team mate, James Perkins. As the ball broke outside the area, Perkins stretched for the first real tackle of the game. It seemed an innocuous tussle and play continued as a Loughborough attacker lashed a sumptuous drive which inched the wrong side of the post for a goal kick. But that goal kick was never taken as, immediately, both team benches jumped up and hollered for an ambulance. Perkins had broken his leg in what was a morose ending to a promising match. Rustiness turned to well-oiled, lamb to lion as the Oxford beast was woken from its slumber. Aided by the gale, Simon Jalie curled a well-worked free kick over the bar, and then bulleted a shot against the opposing keeper when put through one-on-one. Routine balls over the top were turned into lethal opportunities as the soddened turf favoured the mental and physical speed of the home attack. One might have thought that the Navy would be adept at watery situations. Yet they were more barnacle than good ship as they just about managed to hold out until the break. But on 47 minutes their defence was breached. A break down the left saw Luther Sullivan slide through a simple cross for the onrushing Vince Vitale, who evaded the all-at-sea defence and slotted into the empty net. A simple goal, almost matched seconds later when the omnipresent Vitale crossed for Joel Lazarus, who thrashed a fierce drive wide. Oxford were looking comfortable, the defence in particular excelling. The wiry James Doree ranged up and down the left flank, Owen Price was superb in the air, and the team was well marshalled at the back by the pairing of Captain Jack Hazzard and Paul Rainford. The five coaches of the mariners decided to make a change, bringing on the aptly named duo of Major and Salt. With the wind in their favour they pushed back the Oxford defensive line, and only a lack of polish on their final ball stopped them from getting back into the game. Referee Taylor turned down what seemed a legitimate penalty as the Navy’s Hirst was felled after a corner. A closer escape was to follow for Oxford as their opponents had a goal ruled out when Navy captain Thomas needlessly nodded in a goalbound shot from an offside position. Oxford clung on for a win that was, on balance, deserved. With their naval foe dispatched and Perkins’ injury partly exorcised, the Blues can look forward to the rest of the season with confidence and relish.After the match, Hazzard said he was “pleased with the result more than the performance.” But, he added, “conditions were tough and I know we can play better. We just needed to get our first win of the season. Hopefully the performances will come off that.” Of Perkins’ injury, Hazzard said it was too early to comment. Cherwell would like to wish him a speedy recovery.After an execrable opening period some observers might have wished that Referee Bruce Taylor would also swiftly end the match against the Royal Navy. The Oxford machine mirrored the rusty leaves falling from the trees. The only highlight, if one can call it that, was a facial injury to a Navy player who returned to the pitch with his face plastered with tape, looking like Hannibal Lecter from Silence of the Lambs. But it was Oxford who played like silent lambs until, on 25 minutes, from out of the grey, Matt Rigby bolted a 40-yard drive which cannoned back off the bar.ARCHIVE: 3rd week MT 2005last_img read more

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Watch Jerry Garcia And Phil Lesh Explain The Origins Of “Grateful Dead” In Clip From New Documentary

first_imgAfter years and years of anticipation, delays, and a variety of obstacles, the long-awaited Grateful Dead documentary Long Strange Trip will be made available to the public on May 26th via Amazon Prime Video. The film, produced by legendary filmmaker Martin Scorsese and directed by Amir Bar-Lev, made its debut at the acclaimed Sundance Film Festival earlier this year to glowing reviews. Running nearly four hours in length, this sprawling look at the history of one of the most influential bands in American music history features in-depth interviews from roadies, band members and extended Dead family members, along with incredible unseen behind-the-scenes and live footage spanning from the band members’ childhood through the various rungs of their climb to success.Long Awaited Grateful Dead Documentary Will Soon Be Available On AmazonEarlier this week, Entertainment Weekly posted an exclusive clip from the movie, which features interspersed video interviews of Garcia (from the ’90s) and bassist Phil Lesh (in the present day) talking about the origin of the band’s name. As they explain in the clip, the band had been using the name The Warlocks, but after discovering another group with that name, they had to pick a new moniker. While brainstorming ideas, Jerry opened a dictionary to a random page, and written on the page, nestled in the small print, were the words “Grateful Dead.” You can check out the clip below, via EW:The movie is broken into six distinct parts, touching on Jerry Garcia’s well documented history of drug addiction, the complications of the band’s increased popularity in the 80s and the unique community that grew an unwieldy size by the early 90s. While the film’s scope is wider than any film about the band to date, it is less concerned with displaying a detailed chronology of The Grateful Dead and more focused on conveying the bands adventurous and idiosyncratic essence–how their music manifested as a truly communal artistic effort, and garnered a following closer to that of a religion than that of a rock and roll band. As clips, clues, and reviews continue to surface ahead of its public release, our level of excitement could not be higher for the long-awaited Long Strange Trip this May![h/t – Entertainment Weekly]last_img read more

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Police: Newly found blood sample solves 1988 homicide

first_imgBATTLE CREEK, Mich. (AP) — Police say they solved the murder of a Battle Creek woman more than 30 years later, after an old blood sample connected a man to the fatal stabbing. No charges will be filed because Roger Plato was killed in 1988, three days before Gayle Barrus’ body was found in Calhoun County. Barrus’ family is relieved that authorities believe the case has been solved. Barrus had been sexually assaulted and stabbed. Police tested a recently discovered blood sample that was taken from a suspect after he was killed in 1988. Plato’s blood matched DNA found on the victim.last_img

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Angels Offseason Options: Mike Moustakas

first_img Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros (This is the latest in a series of quick profiles on players who fit for the Angels to add over the winter. They are purely “informed speculation,” based on what we know about the Angels’ roster needs along with General Manager Billy Eppler’s preferences and history. We’ll have a new one every weekday, until the GM Meetings, which are the unofficial start of the hot stove season.)MIKE MOUSTAKAS, 3B, Milwaukee BrewersThe basics: A product of Chatsworth High, Moustakas came up as a power-hitting third baseman with the Kansas City Royals, with four seasons of 20 homers. He was widely connected to the Angels as a free agent last winter, but he ended up re-signing with Kansas City and getting traded to the Brewers midseason. He will play most of next season at age 30.2018 season: Moustakas hit .251 with a .315 on-base percentage and 28 homers.Contract status: Moustakas has a mutual option worth $15 million, which means he’s probably going to be a free agent. Last season he made $5.5 million. Why he makes sense: The Angels are not likely to have the room in their payroll or roster for a premium infielder who can only play one position, but Moustakas played a few games at first base last season. If he’s willing and able to play over there more regularly, or even primarily, he could be a good fit for the Angels. The Angels could use one more big bat, preferably who hits left-handed, and if he can play first base and another position, that allows him to fill in when Albert Pujols is not at first, but also be somewhere on the field when Pujols is. The transition to first base should be doable, as long as Moustakas is willing. If Moustakas could play first and third, he’d basically do what the Angels hoped Luis Valbuena would do. A Southern California native, he might have some incentive to do what it takes to fit with the Angels. Another left-handed power bat in the lineup would help balance the roster.Why he doesn’t: He is going to cost some money that the Angels would probably prefer to save for their pitching, since they believe they have enough young players with the offensive upside to give them what they need. Also, his career on-base percentage is only average. Defensively, he’d be a work in progress at first.Previous players: C J.T. Realmuto, RHP Nate Eovaldi, RHP Sonny Gray, LHP Patrick Corbin, LHP CC Sabathia, UT Daniel Descalso, RHP Julio Teheran, LHP Gio Gonzalez, UT Marwin Gonzalez, LHP J.A. Happ, LHP Will Smith.Related Articles Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield center_img Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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