Woman facing battery charge after spitting on cop; claiming COVID infection

first_img By Carl Stutsman – May 28, 2020 1 873 WhatsApp Pinterest Facebook Twitter Woman facing battery charge after spitting on cop; claiming COVID infection WhatsApp Facebook Google+ Pinterest Google+ Twitter (“Prison Bars Jail Cell” by Jobs For Felons Hub, CC BY 2.0) It all started with a simple traffic violation, but when Elkhart County Deputies pulled over 32 year old Maria Joiner she gave them a fake name and an ID that did not belong to her.Booking her under the false name her ruse was eventually ruined when her mother called police and told them while she was out of town her car had gone missing and was involved in a crash. That vehicle was the one Joiner had been driving.The bodily waste charge is because she allegedly claimed she had Coronavirus, started coughing, and then spit on an officer.Police also discovered she had warrants out in Cass County,IN and in Illinois.You can read more here with The Elkhart Truth CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Previous articleTGI Friday’s locations close in Mishawaka and South BendNext articleSmall business owners concerned about COVID-19 liability as they reopen Carl Stutsmanlast_img read more

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The rigor of reargument

first_imgRussell Kornblith got his J.D. at Harvard Law School in May. Compact and fit, he looks like a vest-pocket Superman, able (perhaps) to leap tall buildings in a single bound. But his latest feat of strength was staying up late — for 14 weeks.It was for a good cause, and Kornblith had plenty of company. Since early March, two professors from Harvard’s International Human Rights Clinic and four law students — all from the Class of 2012 — each worked up to 80 hours a week. They scoured archives, pored over cases, and struggled to craft the right language for  a brief of amici curiae — a “friends of the court” brief — in the matter of Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum. It’s now on its way to the U.S. Supreme Court.The lawsuit, brought by 12 Nigerians, alleges that the Dutch oil company was complicit in torture, extrajudicial executions, and other crimes against humanity from 1992 to 1995. The plaintiffs are members of the Ogoni people of the Niger Delta, who during this time were protesting a new pipeline being laid by Shell contractors. The amici — the clinic’s clients — are nine legal historians, including Charles Donahue, Harvard’s Paul A. Freund Professor of Law.Susan H. Farbstein, a team member and an assistant clinical professor at Harvard Law School, called Kiobel ”one of the biggest human rights cases the [Supreme Court] has heard in recent years.”At issue: What are the limits of corporate liability? And can U.S. courts hear lawsuits regarding incidents outside U.S. territory? (It’s an issue lawyers call “extraterritoriality.”)Behind those questions is a debate over the interpretation and intent of the Alien Tort Statute, a 1789 law that allows foreigners to bring suit in U.S. courts. The statute was seldom cited until 1980, when it was revived as the basis for international human rights litigation.“Decades of jurisprudence are on the line in Kiobel,” said Clinical Professor of Law Tyler R. Giannini, who co-directs the clinic with Farbstein. “Cases have been litigated for more than 30 years for claims arising outside the United States, including for more than 15 years against corporations.” A Supreme Court ruling against either corporate liability or extraterritoriality, he said, “would represent a radical departure from this recent history.”That departure would limit the right of plaintiffs to seek redress from multinational corporations. For those writing the brief, the stakes were high.“The challenge is making sure you have a sufficient store of adrenalin,” said Sarah Alexander, J.D. ’12. She worked with Kornblith, sometimes 19 hours a day. (Other team members were Yonina Alexander, J.D. ’12 — no relation to Sarah — and Daniel Saver, J.D. ’12.)The team established a “war room” in Pound Hall and, after December, on the third floor of Wasserstein Hall. The brief came to life there, line by line, on a large-screen monitor. “We endlessly discussed the significance of historical cases and doctrines amongst ourselves and with the amici,” said Giannini. “There were countless calls, discussions, and drafts exchanged until we had a polished brief.”Finishing was a triumph. The magic moment came just after 5 p.m. June 13, when the team filed its 35-page brief (plus appendices) electronically. Kornblith was up until 5 a.m. that day, hammering out last-minute details via Skype, talking at his computer. “The neighbors complained,” he said.Case historyIn February, the Supreme Court was confronted with a lawsuit that might have seemed out of place: Nigerian plaintiffs suing a Dutch company in American courts over alleged abuses committed in Africa. Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr. seemed skeptical. “What business does a case like that,” he asked, “have in the courts of the United States?”That question will be resolved after the court meets again in October. Meanwhile, the two rounds of briefing on Kiobel drew a flurry of amicus briefs from interested parties (amici) on both sides of the question: multinational corporations, governments, South African jurists, Nuremberg scholars, and specialists in international law, business law, human rights, and civil procedure.During oral arguments before the court on Feb. 28, only corporate liability, the first issue, was highlighted. (The same team wrote a brief for that.) “We know that corporations have rights,” said Farbstein. “The question is whether they will also have liabilities.”But the justices asked for a second round of briefs, what lawyers call a “reargument,” on the issue of extraterritoriality. That’s unusual, said Farbstein. “It means that the justices were interested in this question and felt it wasn’t sufficiently addressed in the first round of briefing.”In early March, the team received a specific task from its nine clients, the legal historians: Use history to make an argument for the legal soundness of extraterritoriality.Writing a legal history brief had already worked well for the Harvard team in the first round of arguments. It had uncovered “The Case of Thomas Skinner, Merchant v. The East India Company,” a 1666 British trial that put an individual head to head with the biggest proto-corporate player of the 17th century. Skinner showed, said Farbstein, that “even a powerful corporate actor can be held accountable when it commits international law violations.”History shows that the Alien Tort Statute meant that civil liability for international law violations would follow the defendant, said Giannini. “The basic principle at the time … was that a violator could be held accountable wherever he could be found, and that still holds true today.”Go back to 1789, Kornblith said, to the framers of the statute and to their intentions. “The idea behind the First Congress’s actions was that this was a statute meant to cover acts that concern the whole world,” he said. “One of these acts is not just an assault on the person who was assaulted, it’s an assault on principles of justice and humanity.”The team brief provided other history lessons, citing 34 cases (1666 to 2011), six U.S. statutes, and more than 20 other authorities.The team brief also used two stark historical examples of how a “universally accepted law of nations” was often applied, despite where alleged offenses occurred: piracy and — eventually — the slave trade.But the Alien Tort Statute itself, its antecedents, and the context of its framing do not tell the whole story. The young United States wanted to tell the world it respected international law, said Farbstein, and that it would be a beacon of justice.“This gets back to what values we hold dear as a country,” she said. “Are we going to harbor individuals who commit these kinds of egregious abuses? … Are we going to say they can be held accountable here because we have bold international law principles — or not?”Read the brief here (pdf).last_img read more

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It’s all about the “fit” – get the absolute best out of employees!

first_imgIf you’re a sports fan like me, it’s interesting to see how players can struggle with one team, get traded to another, and all of a sudden blossom into a superstar. That process is especially maddening if a player started with your team and blossoms while playing for your rival! Often, the explanation for this occurrence is that he/she was a better “fit” with the new team.When thinking about it further, that player could’ve been a better fit with the new team’s coaching, system/style of play, or structure and discipline – in other words, they fit better with the culture. Additionally, the reference to fit could also apply to his/her new teammates or maybe a slight change in positioning – in other words, they fit better into a new role.Both of these issues – culture and role – are vital to your credit union’s ability to attract and retain the best talent … to produce your version of “superstars”!Before any long-term success can be attained, you need to do two things:Clearly define your desired culture. And be specific about the qualities you will demand in future employees who will perform within your culture.Identify the desired competencies for each role. Again, specificity is important but so is prioritization. Don’t create a list of 20 competencies; create a list of the most critical one or two.Consider the following retail examples and how they may apply to your organization:For their retail stores, Nike hires people who are passionate about sports. They may not be great athletes themselves, but they love sports, both as a player and fan. Are your employees passionate about working at the credit union and serving your members?Apple knows that most customers come into their stores with a tech problem – either their current tech isn’t working and/or they need new, better tech. As a result, the number one quality they look for in a retail associate is empathy. Your employees are tasked with solving member’s financial problems, too … is empathy the number one quality possessed by each employee?Regardless of the position, Disney says their candidates must immediately demonstrate friendliness in the interview process. If a candidate doesn’t freely and obviously smile, make eye contact, be genuinely warm, etc. they will not advance to a second interview (regardless of how much experience they have). Do your employees immediately and obviously demonstrate friendliness?Unlike other restaurants, Chick-fil-a does not look for previous experience in their recruiting process. In fact, they would prefer to hire someone who has never worked in fast-food before. They don’t want to break old habits; they want to shape new ones. How important is previous credit union or banking experience in your selection process?As each of these companies has done, your credit union should identify what’s most important to you and your culture. Then, once you’ve identified it, don’t waver from it – don’t give in to the temptation to hire someone who looks/sounds good but isn’t passionate or empathetic or obviously friendly. As an old boss used to tell me, “Your biggest fear will be an empty chair. But don’t make hiring decisions out of fear.” You only get one chance to fill that empty chair; make sure you do it right the first time by sticking to what you said is most important to your culture and organization.The retail examples above focus on the need for a strong culture fit; now let’s talk about the equally important need for position or role fit. In the sports analogy mentioned in the first paragraph, the new team wants to acquire a player who possesses the talents, skills, and competencies that are appropriate for the game plan they want to deploy – not what the other team(s) deploy. What game plan is your credit union looking to deploy?During a recent culture assessment with a client, we received the three following responses to survey questions:I enjoy the sales aspect of my job – 74% of member facing staff and 75% of branch managers could not agree with thisI enjoy the service aspect of my job – 89% of frontline staff agreed with thisI’m motivated by offering the right products and services to members – only 43% agreed with thisThink about the impact of this dynamic and how it would impact your credit union’s ability to execute your game plan. Largely, they have employees who do not like offering or selling products to members. Well, if their “game plan” is to become the PFI for their members, they have people who don’t fit. Conversely, if their game plan is be all about service, they may have the right people fit. At best, the wrong people-fit will restrict your ability to succeed; at worst, it will sabotage all other efforts to become top-of-wallet with your membership.There are various ways to address this issue of “fit” and there are multiple layers to it but here are four quick recommendations as you think about the culture you need to create for optimal success in 2021:Defining your culture fit and role fit is not something defined and executed by the HR exec only. This must be a collaborative process that is strategic in nature (especially the culture piece of it) and needs to be decided and supported by the entire executive/leadership team.When determining the role fit, be sure to recognize the various sales and service roles within your credit union and accept the fact that the primary talents, skills, and competencies are likely distinctly different for each role. (The top quality for a Call Center Rep is different than a Universal Banker, for instance.)Make the future process of recruiting and selection of talent a highly collaborative one. Yes, it is ultimately HR’s responsibility but everyone needs to play a role in making sure you get the right people for your culture and they get into the most appropriate roles.Referring back to the empty-chair metaphor above, be patient in your recruiting and selection process but also be proactive – seek out talent even when you don’t have an immediate need and when you do find the right fit, act swiftly to hire that person.It can be very challenging for most organizations to work through this process of defining your culture and role fits. Politics often get in the way; loud voices influence the final decision; execs can get distracted by chasing purple squirrels. If you need an outside, unbiased facilitator to keep you focused and lead you to a successful completion of this critical process, we can help. Please reach out to www.fi-strategies.com/contact-us. 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Paul Robert Paul Robert has been helping financial institutions drive their retail growth strategies for over 20 years. Paul is the Chief Executive Officer for FI Strategies, LLC, a private consulting company … Web: fi-strategies.com Detailslast_img read more

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Indonesia reports new H5N1 death

first_imgAug 4, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – An official from Indonesia’s health ministry recently confirmed that a 19-year-old man died from an H5N1 avian influenza infection.Nyoman Kandun, director general of communicable diseases at the health ministry, said the man died last week in a hospital west of Jakarta, according to an Aug 2 report from the Associated Press (AP).The man, a cargo worker, died in Tangerang, a suburb of Jakarta, Xinhua, China’s state news agency, reported yesterday. If his death and another reported last month are confirmed by the World Health Organization (WHO), the man would be listed as Indonesia’s 137th H5N1 case and its 112th death.Media reports gave no details about the source of the man’s infection or whether his personal contacts have undergone medical evaluation.The confirmation of the man’s death by an Indonesian health official appears to deviate from the country’s recent policy of foregoing official announcement of H5N1 cases as they occur, opting instead for periodic updates. In early June, health minister Siti Fadilah Supari said the country would announce cases at longer intervals, perhaps as long as 6 months, according to previous reports.Though Indonesia’s stance appears to raise questions about its compliance with International Health Regulations, WHO officials have said its relationship with the country remains good and that the delay in reporting has not hampered the ability to conduct joint investigations into Indonesian H5N1 cases.Healthcare workers and family members alerted the media about Indonesia’s last H5N1 case, that of a 38-year-old man who reportedly died on Jul 10. However, a health ministry spokeswoman declined to confirm the case and said officials would release the information in an H5N1 case update at the end of July. No updates appear to have been posted on the government’s health ministry or avian influenza Web sites.Also, it’s not clear if Indonesia has notified the WHO about the two cases. The WHO has not yet confirmed the illness and death of either man, so for now the group still lists Indonesia’s case count as 135 cases and 110 deaths. Indonesia leads the world with the most H5N1 cases and fatalities.The WHO’s world H5N1 count stands at 385 human cases and 245 deaths.See also:Jun 5 CIDRAP News story “Indonesia quits offering prompt notice of H5N1 cases”last_img read more

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Activation of air traffic is crucial for the recovery of tourism, and three prerequisites are needed for this

first_imgIn line with the aforementioned efforts of IATA, a member of the U.S. Senate for Trade, Science and Transportation, Mary Cantwell from Washington and Senator Rick scott from Florida, presented a bill proposing that U.S. Traffic Safety Administration (TSA) conducts temperature checks at existing airport control points in order to increase the safety of passenger air traffic in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. What is crucial is to standardize all protocols at the global level, in order to bridge the problem that each country has its own different rules and not to depend on the measures of individual countries. Because unbalanced and constant changes in measures lead to the impossibility of travel planning, and as we know air transport is crucial for the tourism sector. It would be testing at airports that would allow airlines to operate relatively normally. It is estimated that since the outbreak of the pandemic, profits of $ 400 billion have been lost so far, and the entire industry could make a record net loss of over $ 2020 billion in 80 (an optimistic scenario). You can see more information about the Council’s Aviation Recovery Task Force (CART) protocols HERE With rapid tests as well as non-contact temperature measurement technologies, things would improve significantly and gain the confidence of both passengers and the state to open borders. These are the challenges and preconditions that must be met, in order to re-actualize global tourist travel, despite the coronavirus. / / / THE QUESTION THAT EVERYONE IS ASKING: WHAT WILL THE NEXT TOURIST YEAR BE LIKE? HERE ARE SOME LOUD THINKINGS Airport temperature checks would be carried out using innovative, contactless technologies thermal cameras capable of automatically viewing a large number of passengers passing through existing TSA checkpoints. It is simple and non-invasive, and such systems have already been shown to be effective in identifying infected individuals and mitigating the spread of COVID-19 in other countries. International passenger air traffic fell by 92% compared to last year. To conclude. Thus, by using innovative, contactless thermal camera technology, it is possible to automatically view a large number of passengers, without contact and creating crowds. Photo: Negative Space The economic collapse that threatens the aviation industry, on which more than 66 million jobs worldwide depend, must not be left to fend for itself because there is a danger of a chain of airlines collapsing before the global pandemic ends, de Juniac said, adding that the resulting loss disruption of global connectivity makes investing in airport testing justified and a priority. Cover photo: Skitterphoto In addition to opening borders, public opinion research has also shown that testing will help restore passengers’ confidence in aviation, which is again crucial, ie the perception of safety. – The key to restoring freedom of cross-border mobility is to systematically test all passengers for COVID-19 before traveling. This will give governments around the world the confidence to open their borders, which would be a great substitute for current self-isolation or quarantine measures. Testing all passengers will give people back their freedom of movement by air, and millions would return to work in the aviation industry because of such a decision, said Alexandre de Juniac, Director General of IATA.center_img Respondents in the survey identified the implementation of COVID-19 protection measures for all passengers as an effective measure in achieving safety. The availability of rapid testing on COVID-19 is what gives passengers the most safety. On the other hand, the big problem is that on test results on covid19 waited too long. However, intensive work is being done in this field as well, and several companies around the world have announced that they are working or have already developed rapid tests for coronavirus, thanks to which test results are obtained within 30 seconds.  Thus, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) called for the development and implementation of fast, accurate, affordable and systematic testing on COVID-19 for all passengers before traveling as an alternative to quarantine. IATA is thus cooperating with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and with the health authorities in order to implement this solution as soon as possible in airports around the world, reports Croatian Aviation. Thus, 88% of respondents are ready to take the test as part of the travel process, while 88% of respondents are ready to take the test as part of the travel process. – IATA Quick testing i temperature measurement – as key challenges – As our economy reopens and Americans begin to travel more, we must do everything we can to make travel safe. ”said the senator Rick scott and added that consumer protection must also be ensured against unfair airline pricing tactics. “This law will make it possible to check the temperature, while at the same time ensuring the flexibility of airlines with customers who get sick after buying a flight. If passengers are not allowed to fly due to fever, airlines will need to work with the client to transfer or cancel the flight free of charge.”Scott points out. IATA’s opinion poll revealed support for testing for COVID-19 in the air travel process. Approximately 65% ​​of passengers surveyed agreed that quarantine should not be required if a person is tested for COVID-19 and has a negative result. 84% of respondents agreed that testing should be mandatory for all passengers, Photo: JJ Jordan I recently wrote that globally the tourism sector at the time of the coronavirus pandemic, has two big challenges which must be resolved in order to attempt to return confidence global travelers, which are: rapid testing i temperature measurement at the entrance of both the state and the destination.  Activation of air traffic is key to the recovery of tourism, and they are needed for that three key prerequisites: Standardization of security protocols in airports and airlines, fast testing, ie fast obtaining of test results, and contactless thermal camera technology capable of automatically screening a large number of passengers. – Safety is the highest priority of aviation. We are the safest form of transport because we work together with governments to implement global standards. With the costs associated with daily border closures and the emergence of a second wave of contagion, the aviation industry needs to bring all parties together and find a solution, and that is testing each passenger. It must be fast, accurate and simple. This will certainly allow the market to recover, adds de Juniac. For the right start and a new impetus for global tourism, it is crucial to start international air transport. It is on this topic that the global scene is intensively discussed and guidelines and protocols are proposed for the creation of security protocols, both when boarding planes and in airports in general. last_img read more

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Over 13,000 S. African health workers contract coronavirus

first_imgA combination of a recent spike in infections, staff shortages and a lack of personal protective equipment (PPE) have been blamed for the infection increases.A recent report by South Africa’s National Institute for Occupational Health said hospital admissions of health workers were increasing weekly in line with the national trend of rising numbers of admissions.The data revealed that by July 12, some 2.6 percent of COVID-19 hospital admissions in South Africa were healthcare workers.Those infected included nurses, doctors, porters, administrators, paramedics and laboratory scientists.  Health Minister Zweli Mkhize told parliament earlier this month that “since the COVID-19 pandemic, PPE supply chains have become severely constrained”. WHO Africa chief Moeti said it was critical to ensure health workers “have the equipment, skills and information they need to keep themselves, their patients and colleagues safe”.Sub-Saharan Africa has recorded more than 750,000 coronavirus cases, including 15,000 deaths. Topics : Coronavirus has infected some 13,000 South African health workers and killed more than 100 of them, the health ministry said Thursday, as the virus takes a toll on frontline caregivers.South Africa holds the highest number of infections on the continent with 408,052 recorded cases and 5,940 deaths so far.It is also the world’s fifth worst-affected country in terms of diagnosed infections.center_img Health ministry spokesman Popo Maja told AFP that 13,174 health workers had become infected as of Tuesday, including 103 deaths and 6,394 people declared recovered.South Africa’s statistics were unveiled as the World Health Organization (WHO) reported that more than 10,000 health workers in 40 countries had been sickened by the virus.”The growth we are seeing in COVID-19 cases in Africa is placing an ever-greater strain on health services across the continent,” said Matshidiso Moeti, WHO regional director for Africa, at a news conference on Thursday. “This has very real consequences for the individuals who work in them, and there is no more sobering example of this than the rising number of health worker infections,” she said.last_img read more

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