Put down those cold cuts

first_img Related What we eat and why we eat it The dietary factor People who increased their daily servings of red meat over an eight-year period were more likely to die during the subsequent eight years than those who did not increase their red meat consumption, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study also found that decreasing red meat and simultaneously increasing healthy alternative food choices over time was associated with lower mortality.A large body of evidence has shown that greater consumption of red meat, especially processed red meat, is associated with higher risk of Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, certain types of cancers, including those of the colon and rectum, and premature death. This is the first longitudinal study to examine how changes in red meat consumption over time may influence that risk.For this study, researchers used health data from 53,553 women in the Nurses’ Health Study and 27,916 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer at baseline. They looked at whether changes in red meat consumption from 1986 to 1994 predicted mortality in 1994 to 2002, and whether changes from 1994 to 2002 predicted mortality in 2002 to 2010.Increasing total processed meat intake by half a daily serving or more was associated with a 13 percent higher risk of mortality from all causes. The same amount of unprocessed meat increased mortality risk by 9 percent. The researchers also found significant associations between increased red meat consumption and increased deaths due to cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, and neurodegenerative disease.The association of increases in red meat consumption with increased relative risk of premature mortality was consistent across participants irrespective of age, physical activity level, dietary quality, smoking status, or alcohol consumption, according to the researchers.Study results also showed that, overall, a decrease in red meat together with an increase in nuts, fish, poultry without skin, dairy, eggs, whole grains, or vegetables over eight years was associated with a lower risk of death in the subsequent eight years.The researchers suggest that the association may be due to a combination of components that promote cardiometabolic disturbances, including saturated fat, cholesterol, heme iron, preservatives, and carcinogenic compounds produced by high-temperature cooking. Red meat consumption also was linked recently to gut microbiota-derived metabolite trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which might promote atherosclerosis.“This long-term study provides further evidence that reducing red meat intake while eating other protein foods or more whole grains and vegetables may reduce risk of premature death,” said senior author Frank Hu, Fredrick J. Stare Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology and chair, Department of Nutrition. “To improve both human health and environmental sustainability, it is important to adopt a Mediterranean-style or other diet that emphasizes healthy plant foods.”The first author of the study is Yan Zheng, a former postdoctoral associate in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard Chan School and now a professor at Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Other Harvard Chan School authors include Yanping Li, Ambika Satija, Mercedes Sotos-Prieto, Eric Rimm, and Walter Willett. The study cohorts were supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, and the current study was supported by grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and the Boston Obesity Nutrition Research Center.“Association of Changes in Red Meat Consumption with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among U.S. Women and Men: Two Prospective Cohort Studies,” Yan Zheng, Yanping Li, Ambika Satija, An Pan, Mercedes Sotos-Prieto, Eric Rimm, Walter C. Willett, Frank B. Hu, BMJ, online June 12, 2019, doi: 10.1136/bmj.l2110. Could a popular food ingredient raise the risk for diabetes and obesity? The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. ‘There they are, on our dinner plates’ Ph.D. students explore the culture and science of food in the Veritalk podcast Philosophy professor’s book asks humans to rethink their relationships with animals last_img read more

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Jamaica beat Britain for women’s relay gold

first_imgBy Steve KeatingDOHA (Reuters) – Jamaica stormed to world championship gold in the women’s 4×100 metres relay on Saturday, beating Britain in a battle that featured 100 and 200m winners Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Dina Asher-Smith.Since 2005 the United States and Jamaica have dominated the event at the worlds, with the Americans topping the podium four times, including two years ago in London, and the Jamaicans three.In Doha, though, the fight for gold came down to Jamaica and Britain, the Caribbean nation returning to the top of the podium with a time of 41.44 seconds. Britain took silver in 41.85 and the U.S. bronze in 42.10. In a surprise twist Fraser-Pryce and Asher-Smith, the two sprint stars of the championships, were not given the responsibility of anchoring their teams but instead went head-to-head in the second leg down the back stretch.Shericka Jackson, bronze medallist in the 400m, brought Jamaica home while Daryll Neita anchored Britain.It was the second gold of the championships for the evergreen Fraser-Pryce, the 32-year-old bringing her haul from six worlds to nine gold medals and two silvers. The Jamaican women have taken over the mantle of global sprint superpower from their men and showed the depth of their talent by winning without the services of reigning Olympic champion Elaine Thompson, who was out with injury.“I am really excited for Team Jamaica and our ladies,” said Fraser-Pryce. “I think it speaks volumes especially going into 2020 (Olympics). There is so many things that can happen at a championship, so we want to make sure all our ladies are ready; no matter who you call on we’ll be ready.”With the U.S. women sprinters turning in unimpressive results in Doha, Jamaica’s biggest threat at the 2020 Tokyo Summer Games could very well come from Britain. Asher-Smith established her credentials as a reliable medal producer by collecting three in Doha — gold in the 200 and silver in the 100m and relay.“It was absolutely fantastic to go and run out there and we are on the best way to Tokyo,” said Asher-Smith. “We are ready. “We worked for this really hard.”last_img read more

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Sexton expected to start for Leinster on Friday

first_imgSexton is back in full training after he was replaced at the start of the second-half of the win over Treviso on the final day of the regular season. However, Sean O’Brien remains a serious doubt after suffering a set-back in his recovery from the hamstring injury that forced an early end to his Six Nations. The flanker was expected to be back before the end of the season but Leinster say they’re waiting for a further medical update later this week while Luke Fitzgerald and Rob Kearney are unlikely to be risked this Friday.last_img

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It’s been like a dream so far: Das

first_imgBy Philem Dipak Singh New Delhi, Jul 13 (PTI) “I am living a dream”, said Hima Das as she tried to put in words her remarkable journey from being a stubborn footballer in a nondescript Assam village to becoming the first Indian woman world champion in athletics. The 18-year-old Das, daughter of farmer parents at Kandhulimari village at Nagaon district, has become the toast of the nation after she won a gold at the IAAF World U-20 Athletics Championships in Finland yesterday. She is also the first Indian — male or female — to have won a gold in a track event at the world level. She joined Neeraj Chopra who won a gold in javelin — a field event — in the IAAF World U-20 Championships in the last edition in 2016 in Poland. Her father Ronjit Das has a 2 bigha (0.4 acres) plot of land and her mother Junali is a housewife. The small piece of land was the only source of income for a family of six. “I know my family’s condition and how we struggled. But the Almighty has something for everybody. I am a positive person and I want to look ahead in life and do something for my parents and for the country,” Das told PTI from Tampere in Finland today. “But it has been like a dream so far. I am now a world junior champion,” she added. Das is the eldest of four siblings. She has three younger sisters and a younger brother. One younger sister is in class 10 while the twins — a boy and a girl — are in class III. Hima herself is in class XII at a college in Dhing, just one and a half kilometers from her village.advertisement “She is very stubborn, if she wants to do something she will not listen to anybody but she will do it with aplomb. She is a strong girl and that is why she is coming up to achieve something. I hope she will do something for the country,” her father Ronjit said from his village in Assam. “Physically also, she is very strong. She can kick football like any of us. I told her not to play football with the boys but she did not listen to us,” her cousin Joy Das said. It is a tough life for her parents given the meagre income but at this moment, they can’t stop celebrating. “…we are happy that she chose sports and she is doing well. Our dream is for Hima to win medals in Asian Games and Olympic Games. Since this morning, the whole village is celebrating her gold medal. A lot of our relatives have dropped in to our place and we are distributing sweets.” Das, though, is not thinking too far ahead and wants to just run faster. “I don’t go out on the track thinking that I will win a medal. What I think is about running faster and faster and I believe that will translate into medals,” she said. “I don’t have any target as of now, like I will win a medal in Asian Games or Olympics. I am just happy that I am doing something, bringing laurels to the country.” Das’ rise has been nothing short of meteoric. One of her village school teachers saw her pace while she was playing football on a muddy field at his village. He told her to take up athletics. Soon, the teenager was spotted by Nipon Das, an athletics coach with the Directorate of Sports and Youth Welfare during an inter-district meet late in 2016. Nipon asked her to shift to Guwahati, 150 km from her village, and convinced the youngster that she had a future in athletics. Her parents were initially reluctant but later relented. Das trained at the Indira Gandhi Athletics Stadium at the Sarusajai Sports Complex, Guwahati. Then, she won gold in the 400m race of the Federation Cup in Patiala in March to qualify for the Commonwealth Games. She finished sixth in the Commonwealth Games’ 400m finals and then lowered the Indian U-20 record in 400m to 51.13 seconds while winning gold in the recent National Inter-State Championships in Guwahati to qualify for the upcoming Asian Games in Indonesia. PTI PDS PM PM PMlast_img read more

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