Pennsylvania Moves Forward with Governor Wolf’s Plan to Control Methane and Other Air Pollution

first_imgPennsylvania Moves Forward with Governor Wolf’s Plan to Control Methane and Other Air Pollution Environment,  Press Release Pennsylvania took a step forward to reduce air pollution, including methane, from natural gas wells and pipelines with the approval of changes to the state’s air quality regulations. Guided by Governor Tom Wolf’s Methane Reduction Strategy, today’s action marks another step in the commonwealth’s efforts to address global greenhouse gas emissions and the impacts of climate change.“Pennsylvania has seen major reductions in pollution since I came to office and our focus on increased reliance on clean energy, improved energy efficiency, and improved oversight of emissions of potent greenhouse gasses such as methane, have all been critical in helping to move Pennsylvania forward,” said Governor Wolf. “I am proud to announce that we’ve taken another step in implementing my Methane Reduction Strategy. The new regulations will help identify and prevent leaks from existing wells and infrastructure, while protecting the environment, reducing climate change, and helping businesses reduce the waste of a valuable product.”The Pennsylvania Environmental Quality Board (EQB), an independent board responsible for adopting environmental regulations, approved revisions to air quality regulations for existing oil and natural gas wells and pipelines. These regulations will reduce emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from well sites, pipelines, and other infrastructure.A part of the governor’s Methane Reduction Strategy, the updated emissions controls for VOCs will also reduce methane emissions, as the same control practices that prevent VOCs from escaping from natural gas infrastructure also prevent methane from escaping as well. The new regulations are expected to reduce VOC emissions by more than 4,400 tons per year, and methane emissions by more than 75,000 tons per year.“Both methane and VOC are precursors to the formation of ground-level ozone, a public health and hazard that contributes to asthma and other lung diseases such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis,” said Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “In addition to addressing climate change, the regulation will improve air quality across the state, ensuring that all Pennsylvanians, including particularly young and at-risk residents, are protected from harmful air pollutants.”The new regulations would require oil and gas operators that produce above a certain threshold to use leak detection and repair (LDAR) equipment to identify (and fix) leaks, as well as use other equipment designed to reduce emissions.Methane is a greenhouse gas more potent than carbon dioxide and reducing methane emissions is critical to addressing climate change. The Wolf administration has taken several steps to combat climate change and protect Pennsylvania from climate disasters, including joining the U.S. Climate Alliance and directing DEP to draft regulations to take part in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative to reduce carbon pollution from power plants.A public comment period on the proposed regulations will open in 2020. After comments are considered, DEP will draft the final regulation for consideration by the EQB. The comment period will be published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin, and comments will be accepted through DEP’s eComment system. December 17, 2019center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Gregory Frank Meyer, 61

first_imgGregory Frank Meyer, 61, passed away on October 28, 2019 at St. Francis Hospital, after a brief illness. He was born on November 3, 1957 in Batesville, Indiana the son of Leon and Marie Darlene (Freeland) Meyer.  Greg was a 1976 graduate of Greensburg Community High School.  He got a Bachelor of Art History from Indiana University in 1981.  He worked at the Greensburg Public Library.  Greg was a member of the Historical Society and St. Mary’s Catholic Church.  He liked to help people with their family genealogy.Survivors include: Father, Leon Meyer; Mother, Darlene Meyer; Sisters, Christy (Mike) Bokelman and Suzie (Paul) Ritter; Nieces, Ashley (Josh) Snapp, Abby Bokelman, Jennifer (Jason) Stiemann and Lily Ritter; Nephew, David Bokelman; Great Nieces and Nephews, Ryan, Carter, Ellie, Taylah, Cathan and Rowan.Rosary will be prayed at the St. Mary’s Catholic Church on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 at 9:30 am. A Memorial Mass will start at 10:00 am. Father John Meyer will be officiating.  Interment will follow at the St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery.  In lieu of flowers the family ask that you honor Greg by donating to the Greensburg Public Library.  Online condolences can be made to the family at www.gilliland-howe.comlast_img read more

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Martin O’Neill won’t allow Republic of Ireland to sit on away-goals advantage

first_img Asked about his pride should his team complete the job, O’Neill said: “My pride in the side has been there from the start. I think the players have wanted to play. “There was a feeling beforehand that some players just weren’t that bothered about playing for their country – I haven’t witnessed it and I haven’t experienced it in the two years that I’ve been here. “Obviously, it would be terrific if we could do it, but I have to be very, very mindful of the fact that we are a long way away from doing that. “We have to put things into perspective: Bosnia are capable of scoring, they could wipe that advantage, that away goal that we have within minutes of the game, and then suddenly they are on the front foot. “If we think that we can keep them out for 90 minutes and camp ourselves just outside our own penalty area, that would be a recipe for disaster. “We have to consider being really on the front foot, genuinely, and going and trying to win this game, and that’s it. “If you’d thought that we’d have to win in the Aviva for the final time, you probably would have taken that.” O’Neill will go into the game with Jonathan Walters available after suspension. John O’Shea, who was also banned for the first leg, and Shane Long trained in Abbotstown on Sunday morning as they continue their respective recoveries from hamstring and foot injuries. Martin O’Neill has warned the Republic of Ireland that relying on their away goal against Bosnia-Herzegovina to secure a ticket to the Euro 2016 finals would be “a recipe for disaster”. Press Association For the likes of 34-year-old O’Shea and skipper Robbie Keane, who is a year older, it could prove to be their final appearance in an Ireland shirt if they do not make the finals, but there will be no room for sentiment in the manager’s team selection. O’Neill said: “That’s called tough luck, just tough luck. I’m not going to put players in because it might be their last international game. “I’ll put them in hopefully on merit and hopefully the experience that they have garnered over the last 10 or 12 or 15 years could stand us in a bit of decent stead. That would be the reason. “I think the motivation is there. If we are beaten here, it won’t be through lack of trying. We might lack a few things in our side, but a bit of strength of character I think is there.” Long, who has not played any football since limping off in Poland on October 11, could prove vital with Daryl Murphy, who started in Zenica, sitting out training on Sunday with a calf injury, although O’Neill confirmed that was purely precautionary. However, the Ireland boss will have to come up with a team which strikes the right balance between potency in attack and solidity at the back with right-winger Edin Visca a particular focus following his eye-catching display at the Bilino Polje Stadium. He said: “They raid down the right-hand side because they’ve got a very, very fine right winger. What they want to do is try to get it out to the little lad, who is exceptionally talented. “I think he could cause problems to anybody.” The Republic returned from Zenica on Friday night with a 1-1 draw having come within three minutes of a victory which might have made their task in the second leg at the Aviva Stadium on Monday slightly more straightforward. They nevertheless enjoy a marginal advantage having scored in Bosnia, although their 63-year-old manager has insisted they cannot afford to play for the 0-0 draw which would guarantee a trip to France along with England, Northern Ireland and Wales next summer. last_img read more

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