Rory Clegg extends Harlequins contract

first_imgConor O’Shea, says:“We are delighted that Rory has committed his future to us. At 20 he is one of the brightest talents in the country and I am sure over the coming years not alone will he continue to learn and develop from Nick Evans, he will also grow and put increasing pressure on Nick for the starting role. When Rory does take on that starting role, we will work to ensure that he has the skills set to do that for both club and country. Rory’s signature continues our commitment to develop and progress young English talent at Quins.” Quins are delighted to announce that Rory Clegg has extended his contract until June 2013The 20 year old fly-half signed from Newcastle Falcons in June 2009 and made his Quins debut in the London side’s first home game of the 2009/10 season, against London Irish. He has gone on to make 21 appearances, scoring 72 points.Having come through the England age-groups, Clegg was an integral part of this summer’s England U20s side who made it through to the final of the U20 World Cup in Argentina.Rory Clegg says: LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img “I am really excited about the next few years at Quins. We have a young and vibrant squad, which can only get better and build success for the future and I am really pleased to be a part of it.“The coaches have shown a real belief in me and, through their efforts, I feel I have really improved during my time here and hope to reward them on the pitch with my performances.”last_img read more

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George Ford to make Leicester home debut

first_img22 Geordan Murphy23 Manu Tuilagi LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS One of the biggest talents in European rugby, George Ford, will make his home Leicester debut on Friday night. Be there to see history in the making!Leicester Tigers will give home debuts to half-backs George Ford and Jason Spice in the opening LV= Cup match of the season against Harlequins on Friday evening.On-loan lock Ben Gulliver is given his Tigers debut, while Dan Hipkiss returns from injury for his first outing since the defeat at Saracens at the beginning of October.Captain for the day Jordan Crane, Julian White, Steve Mafi and Ben Pienaar all make their first start of the season.“We’ve got some guys away with England, but there’s plenty of experience in there with guys like Whitey, Dan and Jordan,” said Tigers director of rugby Richard Cockerill.“And Jason Spice will be important for us in the next few weeks. He’s taken no time to settle in here, he’s a good player, he’s done a lot in the game and he knows what we are looking for.“It’s good to get Jordan and Dan back from injury and we’ll see George Ford in senior company.“There are a lot of good players in there who need game-time and in this spell of the season you want the players to really put down a marker and show that they deserve their opportunities.”Tigers have incorporated a poppy in the design of the club shirt for Friday’s game in support of the Royal British Legion’s annual Poppy Appeal. The shirts will be made available for auction, with proceeds going to the appeal. A minute’s silence will be observed and the playing of The Last Post by a bugler will precede kick-off at 7.30pm.Match tickets are available now. Phone the Tigers ticket hotline on 0844 856 1880, call in at the Tigers ticket office at Welford Road (open until 5pm Thursday and from 9am on Friday). Or book online and collect on your way to the match.Leicester Tigers (v Harlequins, Welford Road, Friday 7.30pm)15 Lucas Amorosino14 Alesana Tuilagi13 Dan Hipkiss12 Billy Twelvetrees11 Horacio Agulla10 George Ford9 Jason Spicecenter_img 1 Marcos Ayerza2 Rob Hawkins3 Julian White4 Calum Green5 Ben Gulliver6 Steve Mafi7 Ben Pienaar8 Jordan Crane (c)Replacements16 Joe Duffey17 Martin Castrogiovanni18 Peter Bucknall19 Ed Slater20 Thomas Waldrom21 James Grindallast_img read more

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Gavin Henson to miss start of the Six Nations

first_imgTAGS: Saracens Hugh Vyvyan sprained his ankle and will be missing for two weeks while captain Steve Borthwick will have a scan later today on a shoulder injury.David Strettle left the field midway through the second half but has been given the all clear while Chris Wyles will return after missing the last month with a fractured cheekbone. Following Saracens Heineken Cup match against Leinster on Saturday, a number of the squad were injured during the game.Gavin Henson (calf tear) and Michael Tagicakibau (hamstring tear) have both been ruled out for three weeks.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img

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London Welsh Amateurs – Team of the Month (March 2011 issue)

first_imgDecember’s Team of the MonthCharles and Camila weren’t the only ones to be put out by student demonstrations in the English capital – London Welsh Amateurs almost lost a match because of them! Coach Ian Horgan got stuck in traffic at Westminster and only delivered the team kit minutes before kick-off against table toppers HAC.“We did a joke stretch, then ran on the pitch,” explains loosehead/skipper Stephen Roberts. “Our minds were still in the changing room in the first half and we went in 20-3 down. But we had nothing to lose and so started to run everything – and the space opened up.”Centre Tom Hughes, 18, scored two tries as Welsh rallied exhilaratingly to win 21-20, part of a nine-match winning run that put the team in the melting pot for promotion from Herts/Middlesex One – in their very first season since leaving the Surrey merit tables.It’s reward for an adventurous approach – ‘keep the ball until you score’ is their motto – and the fantastic camaraderie in a side that has been together for a dozen years. “We’ve been to each other’s engagements, weddings and divorces!” quips Roberts, 35.Hughes, picked by Welsh Exiles U18s, athletic lock Duncan Jones, immovable tighthead Jonny Graham and sniping scrum-half Rhodri Mogford form the spine of a team that is grateful for the support of the London Welsh pros at their weekly training session. “There’s no ‘them and us’ culture here and players like Gordon Ross like to pop down to assist,” Roberts says. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Having relied on ‘hand-me-downs’ from the pros, London Welsh Amateurs are thrilled to win not only our December Team of the Month award but also 22 kitbags from Canterbury. Now you can take your own kit, chaps!Canterbury KitbagsCheck out February 2011’s Team of the Month – Pencoed PhoenixDo you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipccenter_img Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.last_img read more

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World Cup players return to Edinburgh squad

first_imgAUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – OCTOBER 01: Allan Jacobsen of Scotland looks on during the IRB 2011 Rugby World Cup Pool B match between England and Scotland at Eden Park on October 1, 2011 in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Hannah Johnston/Getty Images) Speaking after his first training session back with the club, centre Nick de Luca said: “It’s been great to see some of the youngsters stepping up and making waves at the club while we’ve been away. Hopefully we can come back, add to that and help move them and the club forward by bringing our skills and strengths.“I love playing for Edinburgh Rugby but personally it’s vital for me to get off to a new start with a coach who is new to me. I plan to do that by putting my best foot forward in training and playing, and hopefully becoming a favourite of Michael Bradley’s as I look to push my way in there and keep the jersey.” Allan Jacobsen heads back to Edinburgh after being with the Scotland squad in New ZealandEdinburgh Rugby were today boosted by the return of eight international players from the Rugby World Cup ahead of the side’s match against European champions Leinster at Murrayfield a week on Friday (28 October, kick-off 7.35pm).With seven players on Scotland duty and one with the Fiji squad, the capital club welcomes the return of three backs and five forwards sharing over 300 caps.Among the internationalists are Scotland’s most capped player and record point’s scorer, Chris Paterson, British & Irish Lions scrum-half Mike Blair, and the complete front-row that started the nation’s matches against Romania and Argentina: Allan Jacobsen, Geoff Cross and British & Irish Lions hooker Ross Ford, who reached a half century of caps during the championship.Speaking after today’s training session, Edinburgh Rugby head coach Michael Bradley, paid tribute to the young players who have stepped up to the mark in the black and red jersey before welcoming the returning internationalists.He said: “During the World Cup a lot of our young players had a lot of game time and they’ll park that experience and learn from it. It’s important for the coaches to see how these players handle pressured environments and, by and large, all of them came through very well, which is very good for Edinburgh Rugby going forward. “We’re now moving into a very exciting second period of the season and we’ve welcomed the national team boys back into the squad. They’re experienced, quality, international players so we expect them to take leadership roles in the squad – that will be one of their challenges in the next two RaboDirect PRO12 matches leading into the Heineken Cup.“Our first match is at home against Leinster and the World Cup players will undoubtedly come into contention for selection as we can’t ignore their quality but these next two weeks will be a test for them to see how they integrate into the squad.”The returning Scots contingent is completed by open-side flanker Ross Rennie and centre Nick de Luca while back-row Netani Talei returns from the Fiji camp. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Chill-out chat with Maggie Alphonsi

first_imgNOT FOR FEATURED!LONDON, ENGLAND – JANUARY 09: Lawrence Dallaglio, Maggie Alphonsi and Will Greenwood pose for the camera during a photo call to open the IRB Rugby World Cup 2015 Headquarters on January 9, 2011 in Twickenham, England. England will host the IRB Rugby World Cup in 2015. (Photo by Christopher Lee/Getty Images for RWC 2015) Maggie Alphonsi is now part of the team in charge of the 2015 World CupRUGBY WORLD: What is your role with England 2015? Maggie Alphonsi: I’m an ambassador for the 2015 Rugby World Cup and my job is to promote the tournament.RW: There’s still three years to go. What has happened so far? MA: We’ve launched the tournament now and moved into our new building at Twickenham. Now’s the start of a lot of prep work. There are only three people working on it at the moment, but by 2015 there will be over 100.RW: If your house was on fire, what three things would you save? MA: That’s not a very nice question! Assuming my mum wasn’t in it, a picture of my family, my certificates and records of achievements, such as my degree, and my acoustic guitar.RW: What three things would you like to see happen in rugby by 2015? MA: First, I’d like to see rugby become the dominant sport in England and be the first thing you see on the back pages. Second, we need to get even more people involved in the game if we’re going to leave a legacy after the tournament. We need more players, coaches, volunteers. Lastly, I’d like rugby to be seen as a genderless sport, for the women’s game to be treated the same as the men’s. It should be appreciated for the athletes and people involved.RW: Looking forward to the Six Nations? MA: Very much. We beat the Black Ferns in the November series so now we’re looking for a new challenge. We’re six-times Grand Slam champions, and when you’re at the top, people are always looking to knock you down.RW: Who are the jokers in the England squad? MA: Heather Fisher, she always picks on me. Amy Turner has the ability to make people laugh. And Rochelle Clark, a close friend.Maggie with Lawrence and Will during the RWC 2015 launchRW: What’s the funniest thing you’ve seen on the pitch? MA: It was in a blokes’ game. Someone took a drop-goal attempt and completely missed, and the ball hit a bird!RW: Any phobias? MA: Spiders. I know that doesn’t make me look very tough!RW: And bugbears? MA: It’s irritating when people aren’t polite. And when you’re driving and cars behind you are tailgating. White-van drivers are the worst.RW: If you could have one superpower what would it be? MA: To make people know when they’d done something bad in a diplomatic way.RW: What’s your idea of a dream holiday? MA: As long as I’m with the people I love I’ll go anywhere.RW: What couldn’t you live without? Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here. MA: Bread – always wholemeal to be healthy. In the supermarket I’ll go straight to the bakery section, get a fresh loaf and some houmous, and that’s my lunch.RW: What’s the silliest thing you’ve bought? MA: A fridge magnet from Amsterdam with a windmill on it. Who needs that?!RW: How do you switch off from rugby? MA: I have to take myself out of the sport as it’s easy to stay switched on all the time. I chill out with friends and music.RW: Who would be your dream three dinner-party guests? MA: Muhammad Ali, a legend who I admire. Lance Armstrong, another great athlete. And (ex-Rugby World editor) Paul Morgan, as he’s good fun, especially after a few beers!RW: Any regrets? MA: No. You make your choices and the mistakes I’ve made have led me to where I am.RW: What would you like to achieve outside of rugby? MA: I’d love to manage big projects, a bit like Paul Vaughan (CEO of England Rugby 2015).RW: How would you like to be remembered? MA: As a good athlete, and as someone who made women’s rugby better known.Hear from Maggie below on her achievements in the sport:This article appeared in the March 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170last_img read more

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Scotland 17 – 23 France

first_imgScotland captain Ross Ford: “We showed today that we are on the right track. We are scoring tries. But when it gets to this level and when you get into these situations you need to handle that and really screw the nut on other teams.”Top statsScotland won the ball 37 times in the French 22, compared to 14 for France in the Scotland 22. The Scots completed 212 passes, while France managed just 137, but 15 missed tackles cost the home side.Scotland: Stuart Hogg; Rory Lamont (Nick de Luca 30 min), Sean Lamont, Graeme Morrison, Lee Jones; Greig Laidlaw (Duncan Weir 48 min), Mike Blair (Chris Cusiter 30 min); Allan Jacobsen, Ross Ford (capt, Scott Lawson 68 min), Geoff Cross (Ed Kalman 61 min), Richie Gray, Jim Hamilton (Al Kellock 68 min), John Barclay, Ross Rennie, David Denton (Richie Vernon 52 min).France: Maxime Médard (Lionel Beauxis 61 min); Vincent Clerc, Aurélien Rougerie, Wesley Fofana, Julien Malzieu; François Trinh-Duc, Morgan Parra (Julian Dupuy 74 min); Jean-Baptiste Poux (Vincent Debaty 50 min), Dimitri Szarzewski (William Servat 50 min), Nicolas Mas, Pascal Papé, Yoann Maestri (Lionel Nallet 65 min), Thierry Dusautoir (capt), Imanol Harinordoquy, Louis Picamoles (Julien Bonnaire 60 min).ScorersScotlandTries (2): Stuart Hogg, Lee Jones. Cons (2): Greig Laidlaw, Duncan Weir. Pen: Greig Laidlaw.FranceTries (2): Wesley Fofana, Maxime Medard. Cons2 Parra (2). Pens: Parra (1). Drop-goal: Beauxis (1)Referee Wayne BarnesMurrayfield attendance 67144 Stuart Hogg dives in for Scotland’s opening scoreBy Katie Field, Rugby World writerIn a nutshellScotland took advantage of a slow start from a French team that hadn’t played for three weeks and built a 10-0 lead in the first 25 minutes with a try from teenage full-back Stuart Hogg and a conversion and penalty from Greig Laidlaw. But it all went wrong in the next 15 minutes as a Wesley Fofana try and a conversion and penalty from Morgan Parra made in 10-10 at half-time – by which time Scotland had lost Mike Blair and Rory Lamont to injury.The second half took a while to warm up, but when it did it reached boiling point as Scotland brought their fans to their feet with a try from Lee Jones, only for France to hit back in kind through Maxime Medard three minutes later. The conversion, and an earlier penalty from Parra, put France 20-17 ahead and a Lionel Beauxis drop-goal sealed the deal for the visitors. Scotland fought to the last, but handling errors crept in and they couldn’t break down the French again.Key momentMaxime Medard’s try after 58 minutes gave France the lead for the second time and forced Scotland to play catch-up rugby.Maxime Medard on his way to the try-line at MurrayfieldStar manRoss Rennie was the RBS Man of the Match for a great all-round performance, and Stuart Hogg also shone on his first start.Room for improvementThe French lost several lineout throws to Scotland, so have something to work on there. Scotland’s scrum was under pressure and they conceded too many penalties and free-kicks there. Also, the dreaded knock-ons crept into the Scotland game in the second half.In quotesThe winnersFrance coach Philippe Saint-Andre: “I am proud of my team. It was physical and hard but we didn’t panic. Our scrum was very strong in the second half. The impact players did their job. Now there is a huge game for us in the Stade de France next Sunday, if it’s not freezing!”The losers LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS NOT FOR FEATURED. EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND – FEBRUARY 26: France fullback Maxime Medard runs in his try during the RBS Six Nations match between Scotland and France at Murrayfield Stadium on February 26, 2012 in Edinburgh, Scotland. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) Match highlightshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/rugby-union/17141693last_img read more

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Sevens World Cup: Russian rugby player in space!

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Sharp operators: Russia’s Ilya Babaev and Kirill Gubin hunt ball against New Zealand in this season’s world seriesRUSSIAN RUGBY has got one up on the Americans – the first rugby player in space. That’s what they’re claiming anyway after cosmonaut Oleg Novitsky welcomed dignitaries at the Sevens World Cup draw in Moscow via a space link with the International Space Station. Click below to see his great ball control…last_img

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Rugby Rant: Coaches need to trust their captains

first_imgToo involved: Olivier Azam directs Toulon from the sidelines, with Mignoni at his sideBy Gavin MortimerAH! BACK-SEAT drivers, don’t they get on your nerves? “Left here”, “It’s green”, “Slow down”. SHUT UP!Well, now we have our very own back-seat drivers in rugby, and they’re driving me to distraction. Who am I talking about? Coaches who stand on the touchline waving and wailing at their players. Worst of all are the coaches who can’t stop themselves holding up three fingers (how I’d like to hold up two fingers of my own in response) when there’s a penalty within range of the posts.Isn’t that why we have captains, to make those decisions? This trend is particularly prevalent in the Top 14, and one of the worst offenders is Pierre Mignoni, the otherwise amiable backs coach at Toulon. Every time Toulon got a kickable penalty last season, there was Mignoni, fingers in the air as if ordering a round of beers at a Mediterranean café.Toulon aren’t short of grizzled decision-makers. Jonny Wilkinson, Matt Giteau, Bakkies Botha and Joe van Niekerk are all vastly experienced internationals who don’t need to be treated like schoolboys in deciding whether to take the points, kick for the corner or take another option.And how does Mignoni know exactly what’s going on out on the field? Perhaps the Toulon pack are on the verge of gaining a precious psychological hold over the opposition eight. In which case, kick for the corner and let’s turn the screw, boys. A coach wouldn’t be able to sense that from the touchline. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Coaches’ back-seat driving wouldn’t have been tolerated in the amateur era. Back then, a coach trusted his captain to make the right call.But sometime in the past decade, when coaches became directors of rugby and attempted to control every aspect of their players’ lives, it changed. Wales No 8 Michael Owen tasted it for the first time when he captained the 2005 Lions against Argentina.Telling Wilkinson to drill a penalty between the posts, Owen walked away, only to see the No 10 kick for the corner, having been instructed to by the coaches. Owen wrote later: “I felt totally undermined, and it was an indication of how Clive (Woodward) wanted to micromanage everything.”center_img Please coaches, stop meddling and treat your players like adults.This was published in the August 2013 edition of Rugby World. Click here to see what’s in the current issue.last_img read more

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Who’s in our current World XV?

first_img7. Sam Warburton – Of course Richie McCaw is lurking, but why not reward Warburton for dumfounding the doubters and adding a much-needed memory of Lions success to Martin Johnson’s 1997 vintage? An All Black icon may well steam back to world-beating form, but the Lions skipper bettered Michael Hooper quite comfortably at the breakdown before a hamstring tear ended his series. That is a pretty good pedestal to be sitting on for now.8. Kieran Read – Shunting Luis Picamoles off this shirt required a special performer, so who better than the man keeping custody of the Kiwi captaincy to deploy at the scrum’s base? Expect Toby Faletau to take this mantle in years to come, but for now it is Read – hugely skillful, intelligent and brawny – who can be trusted to career over the gain-line and plenty more. not for featured Top tussle: Leigh Halfpenny and George North went head-to-head with Will Genia on this summer’s Lions tourBy Charlie Morgan AUGUST SEES the return of The Rugby Championship – one hell of a tasty tournament to follow the all-consuming intensity of this summer’s Lions tour. As the wounded Wallabies head into the most heated of round-robins against Argentina, South Africa and trans-Tasman enemies New Zealand, there will no doubt be many musings on the state of the game in respective hemispheres.To whet your appetite, here is the guiltiest indulgence any pundit could ask for – my team to represent this planet, picked on form. I highly doubt you will all agree on personnel. That’s what makes it fun.15. Leigh Halfpenny – Courage, pace and positioning set Halfpenny apart even before you take his phenomenal accuracy from the tee into account. Does not quite possess the mercurial attacking talents of Israel Dagg, Kurtley Beale or even relative rookies Willie le Roux and Stuart Hogg, but makes far less mistakes and still poses problems with slicing darts from deep. Lions exploits already render him close to a shoo-in for IRB Player of the Year.14. Ben Smith – Something of a wildcard given his meagre tally of 15 caps, but deserves to be in this company for fantastic footballing nous. Composed and versatile enough to make right decisions consistently all over the pitch, Smith is also sufficiently tenacious and sharp to take advantage of even a modicum of space. Israel Folau comes close after taking the union scene by storm.Dancing feet: attacking threat Fofana13. Wesley Fofana – Diminutive but infinitely explosive, Fofana adds spark beyond measure. Although more accustomed to the other midfield slot, he is just as capable in a slightly wider channel and would create absolute havoc with heftier runners lingering in the peripheral vision of defenders. Also a proven finisher, as his electric introduction to Auckland’s Eden Park and a Six Nations schooling of several would-be English tacklers showed.12. Jean de Villiers – Flamboyancy and flair can take a back seat. This crash, bash, carry merchant is so good at the fundamentals – and growing better the more miles he clocks up – that an aura of calm surrounds him. No better was this illustrated than last month, when Alesana Tuilagi aimed a brutal clothesline at the Springbok skipper’s face. Rather than fly off the handle, de Villiers politely made a point to referee Pascal Gauzère. A class act.11. George North – Being hailed as this generation’s Jonah Lomu is a stratospheric compliment for anyone on the left wing, but the sheer destruction North can conjure (the incredible Folau back-pack, for example) make him well deserving of that moniker. Steady strike-rate of 14 tries in 34 Test will only improve.10. Dan Carter – Still the boss of the stand-offs despite the Crusader’s Super 15 exit, Carter has a 2014 sabbatical to look forward to. That makes the assignments beforehand – The Rugby Championship and autumn revenge on England – plus unfinished business at the Rugby World Cup upon his return, very important. It seems the hunger will not wane, which is exciting for the rest of us. 9. Will Genia – Fizzing around the fringes to create champagne moments for fun, Genia is perhaps the easiest selection on this teamsheet. Only Samoan Khan Fotuali’i gives any semblance of a challenge, but the Wallaby’s exceptional ability to mobilise his forward pack – normally one lighter than the opposition – sets him apart.1. Alex Corbisiero – There is certainly a reactive slant to this call, especially since Corbisiero would have stayed in Argentina this summer without injuries to Gethin Jenkins and Cian Healy. However, two Test-winning performances for the Lions in Brisbane and Sydney were supreme in all facets – not just monstrous shifts at set-piece. He has now beaten Australia (twice) and New Zealand in last three Test starts.Blond Bok: Strauss in action for South Africa2. Adriaan Strauss – It has not been easy to emerge from the significant shadows of Bismarck du Plessis and John Smit, but this shock-mopped hooker has managed just that. Outstanding leadership shepherded the Cheetahs to the Super 15 finals, adding to an assured 24-cap international career that can even negotiate “accidental” testicle-grabs. Do not be surprised if his reputation rises further in August.3. Adam Jones – A genial, unassuming assassin of the dark arts, Jones swiftly becomes the MVP of any side he represents – and with good reason. Mauls looseheads at will to provide valuable points for his peers. Just ask Ben Alexander.4. Sam Whitelock – Sumptuous handling, fierce physicality and unrivalled work-rate and three pretty precious commodities for modern-era locks, and Whitelock is a trailblazer in that regard. Frankly ridiculous to think he is yet to reach 25 – there are very few gaps on his glittering CV.5. Paul O’Connell – Super-human display for Munster against Harlequins in the Heineken Cup quarter final was as awesome as any individual effort of last season in either hemisphere. That such a display came on his sixth game back from a career-threatening back complaint is testament to O’Connell’s bloody-minded resilience and unparalleled authority. He brought those qualities on the plane to Australia too – and inspired four nations.6. Alessandro Zanni – Sergio Parisse tends to occupy the customary Italian spot in these ideological sides. However, following another high-octane Six Nations saturated with immense industry, Zanni cannot be ignored. Not as box-office as Parisse, whose link-play remains deliciously easy on the eye, but utterly relentless and marauding – an asset to any outfit, even if he tired slightly in South Africa. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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