Illinois man arrested after pursuit in LaPorte County

first_imgIndianaLocalNews Twitter By Jon Zimney – March 8, 2021 0 242 Facebook Pinterest Google+ Previous articleRokita threatens to sue if HR1 voting reform bill becomes lawNext articleCDC announces new guidelines for the fully vaccinated Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Illinois man arrested after pursuit in LaPorte County Google+ Twitter WhatsApp (Photo supplied/LaPorte County Jail) An Illinois man has been arrested after leading police on chase in LaPorte CountyIt was around 10 a.m. Friday morning, when investigators stopped a vehicle at U.S. 20 and Range Road, for following too closely.‘The driver got out of the vehicle when police asked her to and that’s when the passenger, Martin Devalois, 37, of Braidwood, Illinois, rolled up the windows, locked the doors, then climbed into the driver’s seat and sped off, according to police, as reported by our news partners at ABC 57. Sheriff’s deputies followed.The chase came to an end when Devalois hit a snowbank at a dead end near State Road 39 and Pennsylvania Avenue.last_img read more

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Press release: Work with us – recruitment campaign for new Parole Board members now open

first_img Independent member Parole Board members play an essential role in the criminal justice system, making decisions on whether a person is safe to release into the community. If you have an interest in protecting your community and the belief that every prisoner deserves a fair hearing, then you might want to consider applying. We welcome applications from all backgrounds so that the Parole Board can better reflect the communities it serves. Indeed, one of the main aims for this campaign is to start to redress the shortage of black and minority ethnic members. Judicial member Psychologist member The independent member campaign is open today (18 January 2019) and closes on 7 March 2019.The psychologist and judicial member campaigns are open today (18 January 2019) and close on 21 February 2019.Parole Board Member appointments are regulated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments and the recruitment process follows the principles within the Cabinet Office’s Governance Code on Public Appointments.It is anticipated there will be recruitment campaigns for independent members in other regions of England & Wales in the future. People can register their interest at [email protected] There are three strands to the campaign, with one for each type of member being recruited – independent, psychologist and judicial members.An independent member can come from a variety of backgrounds and does not need to have experience working in the criminal justice system to apply.The independent member campaign is focussed on the North-East, North-West and Yorkshire & the Humber regions of England.The psychologist and judicial member campaigns are open for people with the eligible qualifications across England & Wales.We anticipate that there will be further recruitment campaigns for independent members covering other regions of England & Wales in the future.Notes to editorsPlease contact Will Aslan on 020 3880 0809 or email [email protected] for interview requests.Parole Board members are public appointments. Potential applicants should visit the Cabinet Office public appointments website to make their applications: The Parole Board has announced today that a recruitment campaign for new members is now open.Caroline Corby, Parole Board Chair, said:last_img read more

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Whole Foods launches scratch-bakery

first_imgWhole Foods Market (WFM) has launched its first in-store scratch bakery, at its new store in Cheltenham.The outlet, on the Gallagher Retail Park, opened yesterday (7 November), and is the retailer’s first shop in England, to be located outside London. The US-based firm also has one store in Glasgow.All the breads at the Cheltenham outlet will be baked in-house, from scratch, said WFM. They will be made using organic and unbleached local flour from Shipton Mill in Tetbury. There will be more than 13 different types of bread available, including a ‘beer bread’, baked using local beer from the Cotswold Brewing Company, as well as focaccia, stromboli, bloomers and baguettes.The Cheltenham shop will also offer cakes and patisserie items, which will also be made from scratch. Bespoke celebration cakes will be available to order. One of its flagship products will be its ‘15 Mile Pie’ – an apple pie made with ingredients sourced from within 15 miles of the store.  A five-foot long loaf of beer bread was baked in-store especially for the official opening.last_img read more

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Independent bakers missing out on Bake Off opportunity

first_imgHigh street bakery outlets are failing to cash in on a surge in consumption of sweet-tasting bakery and dessert products, in a trend driven by The Great British Bake Off.According to product information company The NPD Group, in the year to September 2015 UK consumers bought a record 1.5 billion servings of items in the sweet bakery and dessert categories – comprising cookies, tea biscuits, scones and pastries, including Danish, muffins, doughnuts, croissants, tarts, pies and crumbles, cakes, puddings and brownies.This is up 5.5% on the previous year, and 9.2% more than the year ending September 2010, when The Great British Bake Off launched, but bakery shops only increased business by 2.5% over the same five-year period. Bakeries even faced a 3.1% decline in servings in the year ending September 2015 compared to the previous year.NPD said bakers faced strong competition from other suppliers, in particular high street coffee shops, which notched up 186 million servings of sweet bakery and dessert treats for the year ending September 2015, 8.9% more than the previous year.Top five sweet bakery and dessert productsThe top five sweet bakery and dessert products account for more than 1 billion of the 1.5 billion servings. For the year ending September 2015, annual servings of the highest-placed product, cakes, were up 9.6%, and now stand at 406 million. In second place were croissants, which were up 21% over five years at 155 million.Cookies are just behind with 151 million, up 18% over five years, 149 million brownies were consumed, increasing 72% over the same period, and muffins were up 27% over five years to 143 million.Muriel Illig, foodservice account manager, The NPD Group, said: “Has The Great British Bake Off stimulated our appetite for these treats? Yes, the figures show that when it comes to servings of the top five sweet bakery and dessert favourites it’s very much a case of the Great British Bakery and Dessert Take-Off. With another Bake Off series next summer, we’ll once again watch tasty bakes come to life – and many more of us will be tempted by these goodies.”last_img read more

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Lightning In A Bottle 2017- A Preview of the Can’t Miss Music Magik!

first_imgLightning in a Bottle is not merely a music festival, but instead an unparalleled gathering where people congregate to experience open-minded community, and concepts for living a brighter tomorrow.  The instructions are quite simple, and the LIB Thrive Guide says it best: “Lead by example. Pack it In and Pack it Out. Honor the land. Respect others and their journey. Practice good citizenship. Own your actions. Go above and beyond.”LIB is unique for each person who attends the affair; no two LIBs are the same. Some focus on seminars and workshops, listening to ideas and inspirations from a cavalcade of gurus, experts, healers and leaders. Others seek out the litany of visionary installations and collaborative art projects evolving each year. People go to LIB for the diversified yoga programs, the learning kitchen, the spirituality, the tea houses, the improv troupes, the fashion, and the dozens of thriving subcultures. This year, The DoLab is unveiling The Compass; an evolution of educational workshops and content offerings. The Compass will bring a renewed focus on connecting activism and grassroots organizing to our core ethos of education, healthy living, environmental stewardship, and cultural respect. Families, loners, and longtime festival crews come back to LIB to experience what is among the most engaging, socially conscious, and interactive music festivals on the planet. The word “transformational” is thrown around a lot these days, but there is no irony, sarcasm, or tongue planted in cheek here; Lightning in a Bottle is a life affirming endeavor that can fundamentally change somebody, if they are willing and able to surrender to the flow.Lightning in a Bottle 2017, taking place over the long Memorial Day weekend holiday May 24-29, is shaping up to the best and most vibrant yet. Maybe the most amazing part of LIB is the wide-ranging blend of progressive music, across numerous genres and beyond! Below you will find a short list of B.Getz’s “Can’t Miss Musical Magik!”, you can check out his L4LM coverage from last year’s LIB revelation HERE.Have a gander at LIB 2017’s mammoth schedule right here!You can still cop tix to LIB 2017 HERE….but before we get to the epic tunes, a quick homie plug for Fest300’s Eamon Armstrong and his Thursday afternoon workshop. I feel this topic is extraordinarily relevant in this space and time, and encourage both sexes and all peoples to attend and engage.EAMON ARMSTRONG: HOW TO DISMANTLE TOXIC MASCULINITY 12:45 – 1:45 Thurs. BeaconThursday May 25thBeaconAabo- Thursday 9:15pm (and Fri. 3pm at Pagoda)Ultimate Fantastic-11:15pm Brian Hartman – 12:30am-  (and at Favela Bar 2:30pm Sunday) PagodaAn-ten-nae-  12am (midnight)  Friday, May 26thLightning StageClimbing Poetree (w/Lydia Violet) -5pmNicola Cruz 7:45pmThunder StageCharlesTheFirst- 2:45pmTroyBoi- 12:30amGrand ArtiqueElephant Revival 5:45pmOrgone- 7:15pmBootleg Sunshine 9:15pmDirtwire 2amPagodaSaqi- 7pm (and Beacon 2:30 am Friday)GoldRush 9pmBeaconMark Farina 7:30pmLodgeElisa Rose 10pmPavilionRyan Herr 10pm Saturday May 27thLightningBob Moses 11:15pmKaytranada 12:30amThunderSpacegeishA 12:15pmKalya Scintilla 7:45pmDimond Saints 9:30pm Kraddy 12 midnightFavela BarZach Walker 8pmSaand 12:30amPatricio 2amBeaconDJ Nadi 6:45pmLodgeMigaloo 8pmPavilionYaarrohs 1amwords: B.Getzfestival images: Jacob Avanzatocenter_img Crossroads PavillionSun Hop Fat 8pmSabo 9:45pmSunday May 28thLightningBonobo Live Band 10:30pmBassnectar 12:30amThunderMaddy O’Neal 1pmPaper Diamond 9:30pmIvy Lab 11pmWoogieKLMN 2:30pmMonolink 6:30pmGrand ArtiqueGene Evaro Jr. 5:45pmPagodaNaughty Princess 6pm Morillo 9pm WoogieHernan Cattaneo- 12 midnightPagodaSmasheltooth vs. The Pirate 3pmAndreilien 3amFavela BarMUSICIS4LOVERS PRESENTS: SUNSET SPANKING FT. FAT BITCH AND THE BOOTY BOSS (JIMBO JAMES B2B DADON) PLUS DINK! & HYLAS- 5pmBeaconStellamara 2:30amThe LodgeDELPHI 5:15pmlast_img read more

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Food for thought, and testing

first_imgFar from the beaten path of Harvard Square, with its austere libraries and scurrying students, Valerie Nelson is freezing food.Not just any food, but some of the University’s food, which is kept for an undisclosed amount of time in an unidentified location, all in the interest of safety and public health.Nelson is a safety ninja. You might’ve seen her, though most likely not. She’s one of a group of clandestine food inspectors who show up unannounced at some of Harvard’s most publicized events, including Commencement. She was there, sampling the catering trays while using individually wrapped tongue depressors — “Much to the dismay of people serving wonderful things like filet mignon,” she revealed — and was in and out before anyone could stop short, exiting into a haze of fog.“Ninety percent of what I do is under the radar,” said Nelson, whose office is on the outskirts of campus. “It’s a part of the protection of the health and safety of the community that people are not aware of, but it’s happening behind the scenes all the time.”Food samples are refrigerated for three days (most food-borne illnesses emerge during that time, Nelson said) before being frozen, or “archived” for later testing should a need arise.A registered sanitarian, Nelson is public health manager for Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) at the University. She has a litany of responsibilities, but mostly oversees food safety. She’s on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Her program consists solely of her and one part-time staffer.“We’re a one-and-a-half-person team,” she said, though she regularly enlists the help of EHS colleagues who are industrial hygienists, chemists, and biologists.Her team conducts unannounced food safety audits, and her coverage includes the campus’s residential and retail dining spots, Crimson Catering, the Harvard Faculty Club, FAS student grills, and the Dudley House Co-op. “We provide feedback and training based on the results of those audits,” she said.The inspections are less scary than they might seem. Nelson ensures that food is correctly prepared, stored, and served. She works with outside caterers, makes sure they are properly credentialed, and monitors food recalls by the Food and Drug Administration. “We bounce that information out to others so they can check their products and not serve a food that may be potentially unsafe,” she said.But Nelson acknowledges that even outside the office her job has its occupational hazards.“I’ll go to a potluck supper, look at the potentially hazardous foods, and determine which ones I think are safe to eat,” she said with a laugh.Before coming to Harvard, Nelson worked as a city health inspector. “People always asked me where they shouldn’t eat,” she said. “Due to confidentiality, I could never reveal that, so instead I just told them to watch where I go to eat on Friday night and follow me there.”An avid swimmer, Nelson relishes Massachusetts’ lakes, though she sometimes considers the transmissibility of influenza via waterfowl. “I don’t think most people worry about those things,” she joked. “My job does affect me. It’s hard for it not to.”Her advice to those of us cooking today: “It’s important to keep food refrigerated at 41 degrees or below, and to wash your hands before you start. My motto is: Prevent.”last_img read more

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‘If you can stay present, that’s a better place to be’

first_imgStories of learning, teaching, and turning points, in the Experience series.Kathy Delaney-Smith never planned to be head coach of Harvard women’s basketball. In 1982, she was perfectly content at the helm of the girls’ basketball team at Westwood High School, where she’d excelled over 11 years: a 204-31 record, six undefeated seasons, and a state championship.“I just loved teaching and wasn’t climbing any ladder. I just needed to be better at what I was doing, not better in the eyes of the world.”But after a friend persuaded her to interview for the Crimson job, her plans changed.Thirty-four years later, Delaney-Smith has posted more wins than any coach in Ivy League history (322 in the Ivy, 546 career). Her teams have captured 11 league titles, and finished in the top three in the standings 14 straight years.The coach doesn’t back down from a fight on or off the court. At Westwood she filed four lawsuits seeking equal treatment for her female players. In 1999, she was diagnosed with breast cancer. The support of her team and an irrepressible sense of humor helped to carry her through treatment.Delaney-Smith, 66, is quick to note her job is above all about education. “I have always viewed coaching as teaching. I believe it can be a very important part of your education — like a nontraditional classroom. If you educate the whole person, then that enhances performance.”Q: Where did you grow up?A: I grew up in Newton, the fifth of six children with incredible parents. They took the approach that boys and girls can do anything that they want. My mother was a woman ahead of her time. My dad was a law school professor at Boston College. He was brilliant, but not a big fan of stereotypical roles. We all had our choices growing up, but the girls did the dishes and the boys took out the trash. No choices there.Q: Were you athletic right from the start?A: We were very sports-oriented. We lived near Crystal Lake in Newton, so we were all good swimmers. We spent our summers teaching swimming and being lifeguards. I went to a Catholic school from Grade 1 through 12 and there were no gym classes. We did have basketball courts across the street, so I would spend hours shooting and became a pretty good shooter.Q: When you were young you played basketball for your mother at Sacred Heart High School. Did she inspire you?A: Not consciously, but looking in the rearview mirror, yes, she had a huge impact on me. She was really good for her time and, yes, she was harder on me than probably the other players. I was the first girl in Massachusetts basketball to score 1,000 points, but the joke was, “Your mother was the coach — she made everybody pass you the ball.” I think I was a good athlete for back then, but there was not a lot of support for girls. There were no camps, no youth teams, etc. In fact, there were not a lot of good coaches, probably because it was a very different game than men’s basketball. We had six players — three on each side of half court — and we were not allowed to dribble more than once.When I graduated from high school — I can’t figure out why — I wanted to be a physical education major. My school had no gym classes, I was just a good swimmer and a good shooter, so my transition to college was a tough one. I truly was out of my element because I had never played any of the sports I was now being graded on. I remember being on the phone with my mom and telling her I wanted to come home. She said to me, “Kathy, time to grow up!,” and then she hung up the phone.‘Work ethic, toughness, discipline, drive, resiliency, leadership — I could go on forever — these strengths have to be who you are all the time. You usually cannot turn them on and off when you want them.’Q: Did you plan to play sports in college?A: I was intending to play basketball in college [Bridgewater State], but there was no team for women in 1964, just a club. Everyone got to play an even amount of time and who won didn’t seem important. I didn’t join because I was looking for something more competitive, or so I thought. I researched joining the swim team, but there was no competitive team for women at that time. The big program was synchronized swimming, so I joined and swam for four years. I ended up loving it in spite of the fact that it was not competitive.Q: How did you get into coaching?A: I wanted to be a swim coach. I didn’t play basketball in college. I ended up coaching and reffing basketball to make money to pay for college. I got my certification as a basketball official and, in fact, refereed games with my mother. In 1971, when I was interviewing for my first jobs, I had chosen high schools that had swimming pools. Westwood had just built a swimming pool and I wanted to be a swim coach and wanted a teaching job. The superintendent said, “Our girls’ basketball team is terrible.” His daughter played, and he asked, “Can you coach them and can you win?” I said, “Yes, of course I can.”I am famous for this mantra “Act as if,” and as I look back on my life, it’s my mother who taught me that, when she told me to grow up and hung up on me. She made me act as if, which is how I was raised as well. If you are sick, act as if you’re not. I had no awareness that that’s how she was raising me, but looking back, that was how we lived in my family. I wanted that job and I knew if I didn’t know how to coach them, I would learn how to coach them. I would figure it out. I got the job and became the head swimming coach (where I had to start the program) and the head basketball coach (where I had to coach all three teams — freshman, JV, and varsity), as well as teach. I learned very quickly that things were not the same for girls and boys at that level.Q: You filed a number of lawsuits seeking equal treatment for your girls’ teams while you were at Westwood. What was it like to have to fight right from the start for equality?A: They never went to court. At the time, they were described to me as level one, level two, level three, and level four. Level four is basically mediation. And at level four, I got everything that I wanted. We got new uniforms, equal gym time, I got some assistant coaches. Title IX allowed for all of that to happen in Westwood and that’s why Westwood became the premier girls’ program in the area and got a lot of media coverage. We would have up to 1,500 fans at our games. It was a really big program for girls because of Title IX. I was very happy being a teacher and a high school coach. I kept thinking there was still more to do because at the time we didn’t even have night games, we still had afternoon games. I had kids being recruited for college and often parents and college coaches couldn’t get to afternoon games. We needed night games, like the boys had.Q: How did you get the Harvard job?A: Before I took the job, people kept saying: You’ve been at the high school level now for 11 years. You’ve been very successful. You’ve now got to be a college coach. Everybody thinks it’s the next step. I never thought it was. I just loved teaching and wasn’t climbing any ladder. I just needed to be better at what I was doing, not better in the eyes of the world. A friend of mine had gotten the Brown job, loved it, and convinced me to take the interview. I was quite relaxed about it because I didn’t know much about Harvard and had never played college basketball. And I fell in love with this place that day.Q: What happened?A: Harvard was everything I didn’t think it was. It was one of those daylong processes. Marlyn McGrath Lewis was on the committee, Floyd Wilson, Jack Reardon, a lot of really wonderful academic people, and then the two captains. I met the team and fell in love with the energy here. I found myself wishing I had done a better job preparing for the interview.Q: Was it also appealing to you that Harvard was really embracing Title IX?A: That was huge. When local college basketball positions opened, I would always get a phone call and I would say, “What’s your men’s salary and what’s your women’s salary?” And then I would say, “No thank you.” The inequity was astronomical, and that just didn’t interest me. The salary here was a full salary with a staff. And I could tell in conversations with [Director of Athletics] Jack Reardon that Title IX was something that Harvard was going to pay attention to. In my early years here, that was true. No place is perfect, but they were far better than any college maybe in the country and definitely in the Northeast. I thought Harvard was very conscientious and tried to make the situation here as good for women as it was for men.Q: How did you balance having a family with a career?A: I only have one child, so that’s easier. My husband and I sat down and I told him I loved my job. He didn’t love his job, so he quit his job and stayed home with our son, Jared. Jared could come here and I could still be a good coach and have him play in the gym or have him in the office. Traveling was really hard, but that’s where my husband filled in. I think there are lots of creative ways if you really want to work at it. In the ’80s, Harvard Business School had a panel discussion that explored the four different choices women had. They were: Don’t get married; get married and keep your job; have children and make it all work; don’t have children. I kept my job, got married, and had a child. But I was struck by the conversations that I heard with the women from HBS and from medical schools, who said they were competing with men who had found a partner willing to care for all their needs —take care of the car, take care of the laundry, take care of the home, take care of the baby. Women are just starting to speak up, share responsibilities, and have choices.Q: Can you describe your coaching philosophy? What does it mean to you to be a coach; what’s your role?A: I have always viewed coaching as teaching. I believe it can be a very important part of your education — like a nontraditional classroom. If you educate the whole person, then that enhances performance. You cannot be part time in any of the qualities that it takes to win.… Work ethic, toughness, discipline, drive, resiliency, leadership — I could go on forever — these strengths have to be who you are all the time. You usually cannot turn them on and off when you want them. This is what we strive for.Q: Do you have a weakness in your coaching?A: I am too nice. I don’t know if my players would say that [laughs]. I know that I can be a little tougher. I would love to develop toughness, especially in this crazy, un-tough world — the helicopter parenting and everyone gets a trophy. I think we are missing the boat a little bit. We talk about facing adversity and handling conflict a lot. This doesn’t seem to be happening much anymore because parents are doing it for them. I feel many come without the skill set to handle disappointment and the drive and resiliency to move forward. Body language, facial expressions, and a positive attitude are very important components to being on a team.I think coaching is one of the most powerful but difficult professions. When I talk to people about going into coaching, I tell them: Be prepared. Most coaches are high energy and happy. But it’s brutally hard; it’s very complicated. I was not prepared to be in these young people’s lives at Westwood and here at Harvard. I just thought I was going to coach a little basketball. But I ended up being their counselor, their mom, and, oh by the way, their coach. So I had to educate myself and I became aware of who I am in their lives. I’ve always had very young coaches. When I mentor my staff, I tell them: “You are going to have an incredible impact on these lives. You have to pay attention to make sure that you connect with every single player.” I don’t want my starters to be more important than my last player on the bench.Q: What’s your greatest piece of advice?A: “Act as if.” When I got the Harvard job I thought, “OK, I am not going to have the best basketball players, but they are going to be really, really bright.” I am a big believer in sports psychology. I feel performance is 80 percent mental, and if that’s true, I realized early on that I better learn how to develop the Harvard players mentally, their confidence, their visualization skills, their concentration, etc. I decided to read about it and took transcendental meditation courses with Jon Kabat-Zinn [of the University of Massachusetts Medical School]. I had this awareness that that’s what I was going to do when I came here. Some of my early Harvard players would make fun of me because we would do relaxation drills and visualizations. I’m sure I wasn’t very good at it. But I was reading the book or I had taken the course. It evolved into “Act as if.” Act as if you love this practice, act as if you’re not hurt. You just fell down, I know that hurt, but don’t show it. To this day, I get calls from my former players, women who are doctors or lawyers who tell me, “Kathy, I acted as if.” It’s funny that that piece of information has been a lifelong mantra for so many people.Q: You are known for having a wicked sense of humor. Where did that come from? And how has it been important in your life and your work as a coach?A: No one believes that as a child I was extremely shy and lacked confidence. There are photographs of me where you can tell by my posture I am trying to hide from the camera. At some point, I realized it was exhausting to be so shy and so insecure. I just decided to relax and accept myself as is. In order to do that, I tried to interject humor wherever I could. Coaching is a very intense environment, a perfect place to laugh. It helps to handle the highs and lows.Then I got breast cancer. I had never even known anyone with cancer except my dad, who died suddenly of lung cancer. So, cancer was this scary thing. The thought of going bald and telling people I had cancer was scary to me, because I knew nothing about it. I had a wonderful support system, including my staff and players, and it just seemed easier to use a little humor.Q: Did you tell the team right away?A: That was the hardest thing. Oh my God. Telling my son and the team was really, really hard. I had to make jokes. I had long hair at the time, so I let the team cut my hair. It was all humor. Poor kids. If I was 18, I wouldn’t have been able to handle it myself. I told them and I tried to say it was OK. Then the next day, when I came down for practice, no one would come near me. They were scared to death of me because they didn’t know what to say, they didn’t know what to do, they didn’t know how to treat me. I told them it was not contagious, and I made them do a group hug.Q: Why did you decide to go so public with your diagnosis?A: I had made the decision not to and then I just blurted it out, which is probably just like my personality. There was no forethought to it. It was right in the middle of my season and I had a biopsy and then I had surgery. My whole right side was very sore and I had to shake hands with my left hand and I was tired of explaining why. I just blurted it out to a media person.Then, when it was public, I realized I could help others suffering from cancer. There was a woman I sat with when I was getting infusions in the hospital and she was a teacher and she continued to teach part time. She helped me believe I could still coach. And I thought: She helped me. I can help people. In the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association, I was able to talk to people suffering with cancer about the choices they had. People think they have to stop working. I often think, if you love your job, stopping work is scary, because then you sit around and think about it. It’s very tolerable if you can be distracted, but if you are not working or not doing something, then it gets harder.Q: What is your favorite thing about being a coach?A: I love watching young women grow over their four years, both as athletes and adults. Our alumni events are so fun … everyone comes back, older ones bring their children, and it is amazing to see the lifelong memories and relationships they have with each other. Most of them stay in touch and always share something they learned and how they are using it in their lives. I am very proud.Delaney-Smith’s still-strong love of coaching keeps the thought of retirement at a distance. File photo by Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerQ: What have you gotten better at in your coaching career?A: I am better at putting losing in perspective and using it as a learning experience. I am better at helping to develop leadership and different styles of leadership. I am more aware of the power of being on a team in college … how important it can be in total development.Q: You have had such a successful career. Can you talk to me a little bit more about what it’s like to lose?A: No one likes to lose. I am pretty disappointed that it has been several years since the last title. Even though there have been other levels of success, I won’t be satisfied until we get back to the top.Q: Your greatest win?A: There really isn’t one. People will want me to say Stanford [1998]. I would say the first Ivy League title because it was in my third year and [Harvard president] Derek Bok came to the game. All of them are huge. It’s funny; I live more in the moment rather than what happened last year or what’s going to happen in the future. I think that was something my mother taught me. And that is part of sports psychology. If you can stay present, that’s a better place to be.Q: You have such an incredible win-loss record. Do you have a set system for such success, or is it something that changes year to year based on the new crop of players?A: I am evolving with who is on my team. Last year, we had injuries to guards and we weren’t deep in the guard spot. We had an incredible frontcourt but you can’t play without guards. So we weren’t able to get to the top because you need guards. Now, I have a huge amount of guards and I don’t have a lot of forwards. So I have to adjust and tweak my system. I moved two guards to a small forward spot and they very unselfishly are learning new skills for the team. It’s hard for them, but I am so proud of both of them. I have to tweak it to my personnel.Q: Do you think about retiring?A: Not as often as I should. I do get asked that question all the time. My answer is that I will stop when I don’t love it or if I feel I am not doing a good job. I have come close and done a lot of reflection, but I always come back to: “I love it.” I don’t have the right temperament to retire just yet.Q: Do you have a post-coaching plan in mind?A: I have this dream that when I retire, I am going to go to rural South Africa and help girls who don’t have the same thing we have in this country. I want to go help people, but girls in particular. The Harvard Center for African Studies has a South Africa Fellowship Program. I’ve had several basketball players go. There’s so much work to be done. I hope I can do that. It couldn’t be full time but three weeks here, a month there. I keep thinking about it.Interview was edited for clarity and length.last_img read more

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Handbell Choir to tour in China

first_imgFive years ago, Jonathan Noble, director of Notre Dame’s Beijing Global Gateway, heard the Notre Dame Handbell Choir perform before a group of senior Chinese education officials. With plans underway to open a new location, Noble decided the handbells would play at its dedication, Karen Schneider-Kirner, director of the Handbell Choir, said. This weekend, 14 members of the Handbell Choir will travel to Beijing to play for the long-anticipated dedication, followed by a week of concerts before Chinese audiences.“For the staff that works there, it’s a big deal to highlight why they’re there,” Schneider-Kirner said. “They want to introduce more Chinese students to Notre Dame, but also provide a space where American students can go and learn more about Chinese business practices or get involved in other universities over China.”The new center is located in Genesis Beijing, a state-of-the-art building offering filtered air and access to cultural events, lectures and an art museum. After the Gateway’s dedication ceremony, the choir will play several more concerts in Beijing before traveling to Chengdu.“The bells originated in China. It’s one of the oldest musical instruments we have, but Chinese people in general know nothing about what we know as a handbell choir today, with the smaller brass bells playing different tunes and intricate patterns,” Schneider-Kirner said. “It will be something very unique to the people we’ll be playing for.”In addition to the cultural connection, the bells offer a means of avoiding the censorship of China’s atheist government, Schneider-Kirner said.“With the bells, it doesn’t involve lyrics. As more of a sacred music group, I think we can translate better since China overall is a pretty atheistic country,” she added.The Handbell Choir will, however, be able to participate in Catholic services at South Cathedral in Beijing and Pinganqiao Cathedral in Chengdu.“This is a pretty groundbreaking trip because we’re also doing things within the Catholic Church,” Schneider-Kirner said. “About a year ago, a Fr. Matthew, the rector of South Cathedral in Beijing, came to meet with [University president] Fr. John [Jenkins] as a way to open up doors for collaboration. He’ll be saying a Mass with us and then we’ll be doing a concert at the Cathedral for a hundred seminarians.”The Handbell Choir will play several more concerts in and near Beijing over the next few days: three at an international school, one in collaboration with a Chinese instrument orchestra at Peking University and one on the Great Wall.“We’re just stuffing bells in our backpacks and bringing portable music stands,” Schneider-Kirner said. “Apparently it’s nothing we can ask permission for; we’re just going to do it and see what happens.”After a few days in Beijing, the choir will fly to Chengdu, where they will play two more concerts in collaboration with Szechuan University.“We’ll combine with different groups: There’s a Chinese instrument orchestra, a 25-member erhu orchestra, a 50-member choir and a symphony orchestra from the school,” Schneider-Kirner said. “Some of these pieces we’re doing together; in order to bridge the gap, I’ve arranged a bunch of traditional Chinese music pieces that I think will work well on the bells, just so we’re not bringing completely unfamiliar music.” About one third of the music the choir will play on the trip is traditional Chinese music, while the other two thirds are drawn from their usual repertoire, Schneider-Kirner said. The choir will finish their tour playing at a Mass and concert at Pinganqiao Cathedral in Chengdu and sharing a dinner with the parents of a former choir member. Schneider-Kirner explained that the purpose of the trip is to convey a message of welcome from Notre Dame to the students at the various universities they will perform at and to bridge the cultural gap.“We thought it would be a great opportunity … to do things within the Catholic church, which is pretty phenomenal. I don’t know if any other Notre Dame groups, particularly religiously affiliated, have ever done anything in China. It’s definitely groundbreaking in that way,” Schneider-Kirner said. “Primarily, it’s a great opportunity to promote peace and understanding and building bridges with our sisters and brothers in Asia.”Tags: China, fall break, Handbell Choirlast_img read more

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Treasurer Announces New Economically Targeted Investment Program

first_imgFor immediate release:  April 9, 2007Treasurer Announces New Economically Targeted Investment ProgramMontpelier – Vermont State Treasurer Jeb Spaulding announced today that his office will soon be soliciting investment proposals for a new pension fund program intended to support economic and community development in Vermont.  This initiative stems from a policy on economically targeted investments adopted by the Vermont Pension Investment Committee, which oversees more than $3 billion in retirement funds for Vermont teachers, state employees, and municipal employees.“Our pension fund trustees work hard to protect the workers and retirees who depend on our retirement funds and this initiative will not reduce our obligation in that regard.  However, to the extent that we can support economic and community development in Vermont without sacrificing performance, it makes sense to do so,” Spaulding explained.Economically targeted investments are intended to generate market rate returns while providing collateral benefits that enhance quality of life and promote economic activity in a targeted area, in this case Vermont.  Economic or social benefits do not justify lower returns or inappropriate levels of risk.Spaulding stated that the kinds of investment opportunities that may be appropriate for the pension funds include affordable housing, energy efficiency, venture capital, or timber.  “Actually, we don’t want to limit the field of investment possibilities. We are hoping that creative minds will look over our policy and come up with some innovative proposals that meet our criteria for investment,” Spaulding explained.The program was developed to clearly articulate the criteria by which proposals will be judged and to solicit investment proposals from qualified managers once a year.  The first request for proposals window will be May 1 – June 15, 2007.  In order to be considered, proposals must, at a minimum:Target risk-adjusted, market-rate returns equivalent to or higher than other available investments in a similar asset class, andProvide a substantial, direct, and measurable benefit to economic or community development within the State of Vermont.  Any investments will be placed with an experienced and capable manager in an applicable asset class; no direct investments will be considered.Parties interested in receiving more information on the program should go to the State Treasurer’s Web site at www.vermonttreasurer.gov(link is external) or call 802-828-1452.# # # # #Barbara F. AgnewAssistant to the Treasurer109 State Street, 4th FloorMontpelier, VT  05609-6200Tel:  802-828-1452Fax: 802-828-2772last_img read more

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Cuban Agents Advise Nicaraguan Military

first_imgWomen members of the “Mothers of April” association attend mass in honor of their children killed during the protests against the government of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega on mother’s day celebration in Managua on May 30, 2019. (Photo by INTI OCON / AFP) security and stability of countries throughout the region,” U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told the press. “The Cuban regime has for years exported its tactics of intimidation, repression, and violence.”On November 13, 2018, the Nicaraguan Congress authorized the entry of boats, aircraft, and military personnel from Cuba, Russia, and Venezuela in the second semester of 2019 to train and exchange experiences. The Nicaraguan Army will also be able to deploy military personnel in nations that will send their officers with the same purposes. Every six months, the Nicaraguan government renews the entry of foreign troops and military equipment to the country.“The diplomatic support Nicaragua receives from Russia, Venezuela, and Cuba severely undercuts international efforts to apply pressure on the Ortega regime,” said the U.S. Center for Strategic and International Studies in its December 2018 report “Lessons from Venezuela for Nicaragua.”“Although Cuban advisers openly intervene in Nicaragua posing as tourists or covertly, the international community should join efforts to confront and block the Ortega-Murillo regime’s authoritarian actions,” Serrano concluded. By Julieta Pelcastre/Diálogo August 10, 2019 According to the Nicaraguan Institute of Tourism, more than 5,000 Cubans arrived in Nicaragua during the first five months of 2019, an increase of almost 900 percent compared to the 566 who arrived in the country in 2018. Far from being attracted to the country’s touristic landmarks, most Cubans are there for covert activities to help President Daniel Ortega and his wife, Vice President Rosario Murillo, remain in power.On May 30, Nicaraguan newspaper La Prensa reported that 200 advisers from the Cuban Intelligence Directorate operate regularly with the Nicaraguan Armed Forces and provide training to police and Customs and Prison System Directorate officials. Some advisers arrived in the country in 2007, but that number increased exponentially after the April 2018 uprising, which left hundreds of protesters dead, missing, and imprisoned, and led thousands of Nicaraguans to go into exile.“Cuban strategists are capable of neutralizing internal dissidents in the most brutal way and maintaining the dual Ortega-Murillo dictatorship,” said Jorge Serrano, an academic at the Peruvian Center for Higher National Studies. “Cuba deploys political and military intelligence and counterintelligence advisers in military bases and in key situations for political and economic power in Nicaragua,” Serrano told Diálogo.Aníbal Toruño, head of Nicaraguan Radio Darío, told Panamanian newspaper Panam that service members fly into the country on commercial flights among Cuban migrants who seek to escape the island and head to the United States. “This is a covert way of sending intelligence agents and advisers allied to Ortega’s service, at a time of increased fear over the idea that sandinismo will remain in power,” he added.Although the Cuban regime considers Venezuela the crown jewel of resources, Nicaragua is in a strategic geographical location for the interests of the coalition that China, North Korea, Cuba, Iran, Nicaragua, Russia, and Venezuela comprise, Serrano said. “The Caribbean country is the strategic head of an ‘international-continental plan’ that seeks to defend the presence of leftist forces in Latin America to the very end,” he said.He pointed out that socialist leader Raúl Castro and Cuban Interior Minister Julio César Gandarilla run and operate the political advice strategy of radical, violent, systematic, and selective repression in Nicaragua. He also added that this is the same maneuver Cuban political leaders, military, and intelligence institutions use to support Nicolás Maduro internally. “These strategists do not advise from a distance, they do so onsite.”During the May 29 forum the Cuba Justice Commission held in San José, Costa Rica, Nicaraguan exiles denounced the increase of Cuban military personnel in repressive operations by the Ortega regime. During this event, former Nicaraguan service member Carlos Zamorán told the commission that the Cuban presence among the Nicaraguan military dates back to 1980. “The military were supposed to be advisers, but they were prepared to torture and kill farmers.”“Cuba’s behavior in the Western Hemisphere undermines thelast_img read more

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