Flow of Rutford Ice Stream and comparison with Carlson Inlet, Antarctica

first_imgResults from movement surveys on Rutford Ice Stream are presented with complementary surface-elevation and ice-thickness measurements. Surface velocities of 300 m a−1 occur at least 130 km up-stream of the grounding line and contrast strongly with the neighbouring Carlson Inlet, where a velocity of 7 m a−1 has been measured. This contrast in velocity is not topographically controlled but appears to be due instead to differences in basal conditions, with Carlson Inlet probably being frozen to its bed. Concentration of lateral shear close to the margins and surface expression of subglacial topography both support a view of significant basal shear stresses in the central part of Rutford Ice Stream. The pattern of principal strain-rate trajectories shows a small number of characteristic features which can be compared with results from future modelling of the glacier’s flow.last_img read more

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Jazz rout Trail Blazers for 23rd straight home victory

first_img Tags: NBA/Utah Jazz FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Donovan Mitchell scored 37 points to lead the Utah Jazz to their 23rd straight home victory with a 122-103 victory over the Portland Trail Blazers.Rudy Gobert had 18 points and 21 rebounds, Joe Ingles added 13 points and six assists and Utah dominated the glass by outrebounding Portland 58-41 while snapping a two-game skid.Damian Lillard scored 23 points and C.J. McCollum added 19 to lead the Trail Blazers who lost for the third time in four games.Utah surged on offense in the third quarter when it erased a six-point deficit and built a double-digit lead while scoring 40 points. April 9, 2021 /Sports News – Local Jazz rout Trail Blazers for 23rd straight home victory Written by Associated Presslast_img read more

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Schlumberger announces technology license agreement with CNPC Logging

first_img Santos signs new gas deal with Gold Fields. (Credit: Free-Photos from Pixabay.) Schlumberger announced today that it has entered into a collaboration agreement with China Petroleum Logging Co. Ltd (CNPC Logging), a subsidiary of China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), to jointly manufacture wireline downhole technology in China. The agreement will strengthen the commercial and technical collaboration between the two companies and aligns with Schlumberger’s commitment to enable technology access in key basins.The collaboration agreement will provide CNPC Logging with a license to manufacture fit-for-basin wireline technology. As part of the agreement, Schlumberger will support CNPC Logging on the manufacturing and sustaining activities for ThruBit through-the-bit logging technology at the CNPC Logging technology center in Xi’an, Shaanxi province.Djamel Idri, Wireline president, Schlumberger, said, “We are very pleased to continue evolving our relationship with CNPC Logging through this new technology access model, starting with ThruBit—one of our differentiated wireline technologies. This technology will enable CNPC Logging to significantly improve their logging capabilities in horizontal and vertical wells across all China basins. We look forward to continue working together with CNPC Logging to enhance value creation and performance through advanced wireline technologies.”Li Jianhao, president, CNPC Logging, commented, “CNPC Logging and Schlumberger have entered into an agreement to begin the co-manufacture of ThruBit logging tools marking a historic milestone in the relationship between the two companies. With the growing number of horizontal wells undertaken by CNPC each year, the ThruBit platform has become essential to our reservoir evaluation strategy. In today’s low oil price environment, this partnership is more important than ever and this new business model will help us to achieve mutual benefits. I look forward to strengthening the collaboration between our management and technical teams, to continue delivering high-quality products in order to keep improving the efficiency and performance of the CNPC oilfields.” Agreement will enable co-manufacture of wireline downhole technologylast_img read more

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German Defence Attaché Visits Commander of Navy

first_img View post tag: Naval Training & Education Share this article German Defence Attaché Visits Commander of Navy German Defence Attaché to Sri Lanka, Colonel Hertgehs paid a courtesy call on Commander of the Sri Lanka Navy, Vice Admiral Jayanath Colombage at the Naval Headquarters on 01st April 2013.They held cordial discussions and exchanged mementos to mark the occasion.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, April 2, 2013; Image: Sri Lanka Navy View post tag: Commander View post tag: Attaché View post tag: German View post tag: Defense Back to overview,Home naval-today German Defence Attaché Visits Commander of Navy View post tag: Defence April 2, 2013 View post tag: Navy View post tag: visits View post tag: News by topiclast_img read more

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Canadian Coast Guard welcomes final OFSV newbuild

first_img Naida Hakirevic “This is an important milestone in the renewal of the Canadian Coast Guard fleet and represents the first large vessel construction project completed under the National Shipbuilding Strategy. The Government of Canada will continue to work with Seaspan on other important fleet renewal projects,” Anita Anand, Minister of Public Services and Procurement, commented on the occasion. The delivery ceremony took place at Seaspan’s Victoria shipyard on 9 October, in compliance with strict COVID-19 protocols. View post tag: Wartsila Following a transition period for the vessel’s new coast guard commanding officer and crew, the CCGS John Cabot will set sail to its homeport in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, where it will support scientific research, search and rescue operations and environmental response. Last week, Seaspan Shipyards officially delivered CCGS John Cabot, the third offshore fisheries science vessel (OFSV) to the Canadian Coast Guard. Third Canadian Coast Guard OFSV enters water Photo: Seaspan Shipyards View post tag: Seaspan The 63.4-meter-long newbuilding, which was launched in early July this year, will now join its sister ships already in service, CCGS Capt Jacques Cartier, delivered to the coast guard in November 2019, and CCGS Sir John Franklin, delivered in June 2019. In addition to enabling quiet propulsion, the company’s fully integrated solutions also reduce both fuel consumption and emissions, Wärtsilä added. It is planned to begin science missions in April 2021. October 13, 2020, by Canadian Coast Guard welcomes final OFSV newbuild View post tag: CCGS John Cabot Categories: Related Article Back to overview,Home naval-today Canadian Coast Guard welcomes final OFSV newbuild As explained, CCGS John Cabot is the third OFSV delivered by Seaspan Shipyards in the last 15 months and completes the first full class of large vessels under Canada’s National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS). In a separate statement, Finnish technology group Wärtsilä said it had supplied specialized propulsion solutions for the three OFSVs built by Seaspan. Posted: 9 months ago Vessels Low-noise propulsion is very important for the vessels’ primary mission, which is to carry out fisheries research. As such, Wärtsilä designed the propellers to deliver a high-cavitation inception speed to comply with these low underwater radiated noise requirements. Vessels According to the coast guard, the ships will ensure that Fisheries and Oceans’ scientists are working with the best equipment to conduct their vital work on fishery resources, other marine species and their environments. The OFSVs will also support environmental response and search and rescue operations, helping to ensure marine safety and environmental protection which are also key components of the Government of Canada’s $1.5B Oceans Protection Plan. Wärtsilä’s low-noise propulsion solutions for OFSVs The Wärtsilä scope of supply for each of the three vessels includes the propulsion solution, comprising the custom-designed fixed pitch propeller, the shaft line assembly, plus seals and bearings, and the transverse thruster with e-motor and variable speed drive. View post tag: OFSV Posted: 9 months ago Share this article View post tag: Canadian Coast Guardlast_img read more

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Blues win after horror injury

first_imgOxford 1Royal Navy 0Blue was the colour as Oxford met the Navy at Iffley Road on Monday. Only the sky, a pale grey pall, failed to turn a matching shade, as swirling rain and a breezy wind joined force to inhibit Oxford’s passing game, though the home side eventually triumphed with a 1-0 win.Just five days earlier, the season opener against Loughborough III had fallen decidedly flat as the game was abandoned after five minutes. If expectation and hope were the predominant emotions for the Blues at the start of the Loughborough match then these were soon replaced with expectation and hope of a very different kind with players crossing their fingers for their injured team mate, James Perkins. As the ball broke outside the area, Perkins stretched for the first real tackle of the game. It seemed an innocuous tussle and play continued as a Loughborough attacker lashed a sumptuous drive which inched the wrong side of the post for a goal kick. But that goal kick was never taken as, immediately, both team benches jumped up and hollered for an ambulance. Perkins had broken his leg in what was a morose ending to a promising match. Rustiness turned to well-oiled, lamb to lion as the Oxford beast was woken from its slumber. Aided by the gale, Simon Jalie curled a well-worked free kick over the bar, and then bulleted a shot against the opposing keeper when put through one-on-one. Routine balls over the top were turned into lethal opportunities as the soddened turf favoured the mental and physical speed of the home attack. One might have thought that the Navy would be adept at watery situations. Yet they were more barnacle than good ship as they just about managed to hold out until the break. But on 47 minutes their defence was breached. A break down the left saw Luther Sullivan slide through a simple cross for the onrushing Vince Vitale, who evaded the all-at-sea defence and slotted into the empty net. A simple goal, almost matched seconds later when the omnipresent Vitale crossed for Joel Lazarus, who thrashed a fierce drive wide. Oxford were looking comfortable, the defence in particular excelling. The wiry James Doree ranged up and down the left flank, Owen Price was superb in the air, and the team was well marshalled at the back by the pairing of Captain Jack Hazzard and Paul Rainford. The five coaches of the mariners decided to make a change, bringing on the aptly named duo of Major and Salt. With the wind in their favour they pushed back the Oxford defensive line, and only a lack of polish on their final ball stopped them from getting back into the game. Referee Taylor turned down what seemed a legitimate penalty as the Navy’s Hirst was felled after a corner. A closer escape was to follow for Oxford as their opponents had a goal ruled out when Navy captain Thomas needlessly nodded in a goalbound shot from an offside position. Oxford clung on for a win that was, on balance, deserved. With their naval foe dispatched and Perkins’ injury partly exorcised, the Blues can look forward to the rest of the season with confidence and relish.After the match, Hazzard said he was “pleased with the result more than the performance.” But, he added, “conditions were tough and I know we can play better. We just needed to get our first win of the season. Hopefully the performances will come off that.” Of Perkins’ injury, Hazzard said it was too early to comment. Cherwell would like to wish him a speedy recovery.After an execrable opening period some observers might have wished that Referee Bruce Taylor would also swiftly end the match against the Royal Navy. The Oxford machine mirrored the rusty leaves falling from the trees. The only highlight, if one can call it that, was a facial injury to a Navy player who returned to the pitch with his face plastered with tape, looking like Hannibal Lecter from Silence of the Lambs. But it was Oxford who played like silent lambs until, on 25 minutes, from out of the grey, Matt Rigby bolted a 40-yard drive which cannoned back off the bar.ARCHIVE: 3rd week MT 2005last_img read more

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Rent-To-Buy Contract Argued Before Indiana Supreme Court

first_imgJustice Geoffrey Slaughter asked, “What are the terms of the second contract, is it even in the record?”Mulvaney replied it was not included, to which Chief Justice Loretta Rush noted few of Rainbow’s clients were successfully completing the terms of the 24-months and getting to the second contract.“Well, the fact that they get there or don’t get there really isn’t important,” Mulvaney said.Jon Laramore, executive director of Indiana Legal Services, told the court the rent-to-buy contract was structured to avoid the consumer protections offered in the state’s Landlord-Tenant Act, Indiana Code section 32-31-3-7. Although the contract is structured to mimic or look on paper like a sale, he said, the provisions make the agreement a lease.“This is really set up to avoid the habitability protections that the Legislature has decided should apply in situations like this,” Laramore said. “The Legislature says you have to provide habitable housing and that right cannot be waived.”Slaughter quarried Laramore as to the court’s role in the dispute. “Why shouldn’t we conclude that this transaction was carefully structured in such a way, with clever lawyers to avoid the application of the statute,” Slaughter asked. “They found a loophole. The responsibility for closing that loophole belongs with the Legislature and not with us. What is wrong with that approach?”Laramore replied, “I would suggest that’s not consistent with the Legislature’s intent in this statute. The Legislature passed a very broad law. The definition of ‘rental agreement’ is very extremely broad. It covers many things and the exceptions are very narrow.”Video of the oral arguments is available here. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Marilyn Odendahl for www.theindianalawyer.comA dispute that could have a far-reaching impact on the sizable rent-to-own housing market in the Hoosier state was presented to the Indiana Supreme Court on Thursday morning with attorneys arguing over the nature of the rent-to-own contract.The case, Rainbow Realty Group, Inc. and/or Cress Trust v. Katrina Carter and Quentin Lintner, 19S-CC-00038, has zigzagged its way through the state court system. After Center Township Small Claims Court in Marion County granted Rainbow’s petition for possession and damages of the home that had been occupied by Katrina Carter and Quentin Lintner, the Marion Superior Court granted summary judgment to the couple. However, the Indiana Court of Appeals reversed, finding Rainbow was selling, not renting, the property to the couple.Along the way, the case has attracted attention. The Indiana Attorney General and the city of Indianapolis each filed amicus curiae briefs in support of Carter and Lintner as did the Indiana Association of Community Economic Development, the Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic, the Economic Justice Project of Notre Dame Clinical Law Center and National Consumer Law Center, and the Fair Housing Center of Central Indiana.Carter and Lintner signed a rent-to-own contract with Rainbow in 2013 for a home on the east side of Indianapolis. The couple was responsible making the $549 monthly payments, at in interest rate of 16.3 percent, along with all repairs to the residence, which had no electricity, plumbing or locks on the doors. When Carter and Lintner fell behind in their payments, Rainbow eventually started eviction proceedings.Representing the couple, Indiana Legal Services contended the contract Carter and Lintner signed was a rental agreement and Rainbow violated the state’s landlord-tenant act by not providing a habitable residence. For the first 24 months, the couple were to make monthly payments but would not build equity in the property and would be subject to eviction, not foreclosure, if they failed to meet their financial obligations.Rainbow countered the agreement was a contract of sale with the first two years of payments serving as the down payment on the home. Then the agreement would convert to a land sales contract.During oral arguments, Rainbow counsel, Karl Mulvaney, partner at Bingham Greenebaum Doll LLP, reiterated the contract was a purchase agreement and, therefore, not covered by the landlord-tenant act.Justice Mark Massa seemed skeptical, asking Mulvaney, “If you’re going to do it that way, why not sturcutre it as a land contract? I mean, this is chock full of terms (like) rent, landlord, eviction, proceedings. I mean, how is this not a rental agreement when it’s full of terms like that?”Mulvaney responded the seller was very clear at the beginning that the payment would be applied to the overall sales contract. The first 24 months of payments were part of the financing arrangement because the couple did not have to provide a down payment.The justices then pressed the attorney on what comes next with the second contract. Mulvaney argued the second contract was part of the “overall integrated transaction.”last_img read more

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Staffing issues, Over-Centralization Revealed In Latest DCS Report

first_imgMarch 30, 2018, By Quinn FitzgeraldTheStatehouseFile.comINDIANAPOLIS – The latest report on the Department of Child Services shows top-heavy decision-making, trouble with keeping qualified and experienced workers, and a shortage of specialized services to deal with substance abuse or mental health issues.Thursday, DCS shared preliminary findings of the Child Welfare Policy and Practice Group, which has been conducting an investigation of the troubled state agency since January. Since the last briefing on Feb. 1, they have interviewed a range of people from upper-level management at DCS to case managers and families who are involved with the agency on a regular basis.The Child Welfare Policy and Practice Group is a non-profit hired by Gov. Eric Holcomb’s administration to review DCS after the former director, Mary Beth Bonaventura, resigned. She said children in the care of DCS are at risk because of lack of resources to care for them.Sue Steib, an independent consultant of the Child Welfare Policy and Practice Group, shares the latest findings in the ongoing investigation of Indiana’s Department of Child Services. Photo by Quinn Fitzgerald, TheStatehouseFile.comSue Steib, the consultant for the Child Welfare Policy and Practice Group, said that of the 141 people interviewed so far, many are optimistic about DCS leadership and the renewed interest from state leaders. She also cited the hardworking caseworkers and supervisors as well as the DCS’ collaboration with other state agencies as pluses.One challenge, however, is how authority has been centralized, often making for unnecessary work for the front-line staff saddled with more paperwork, Steib said, adding that is not unusual in a state system.Other challenges found were in a lack of qualified workers, including attorneys, and other services that the clients of DCS might need, like help with substance abuse or mental health issues.Competition for qualified clinicians makes it difficult for provider agencies to hire and retain skilled workers, said Paul Vincent, director of Child Welfare Group. But it’s also a national workforce challenge, he added.“You find in some cases waitlists, or you find interns doing a lot of the treatment of kids and families when preferably it would be from credentialed psychologists or other professionals,” Vincent said. “We don’t know how widespread that is here, but it was an early concern and it resonates because we see it in so many other places.”In their initial report, released Feb. 1, they found that a high percentage of children in Indiana end up in state care, more than twice the rate of children in other states. The rate of children in out-of-home care in Indiana is 13 children per 1,000, more than double the national average of 5.5 per 1,000.Paul Vincent, director of the Child Welfare Policy and Practice Group, answers questions regarding the latest report and evaluation of Indiana’s Department of Child Services. Photo by Quinn Fitzgerald, TheStatehouseFile.comVincent’s group also found that the DCS data system is out of date.In the next two and a half months, the Child Welfare Group will continue conducting interviews and be gathering a variety of data as its researchers develop recommendations to improve DCS. The work will include a survey of the front-line staff to determine experience and level of education as well as shadowing family case managers and supervisors in five selected regions.These regions are the Lake, Allen, Marion, Vanderburgh, and Clark counties. CWG will spend one week visiting each region interviewing and observing various groups.“The department actually expanded our proposal to do the field work in four counties to five to make them more representative, and they continue to add respondents to our list of people to interview as they identify people that we also want to contact,” Vincent said.He said the problem now is trying to limit the number of interviews they do rather than not having enough people to talk to.Vincent said legislators asked CWG to conduct a legal analysis comparing parts of the child welfare-related statutes in Indiana with other states and some other statutes that are specific to both foster care and the child protection areas.The final report will be provided to Holcomb’s office and Terry Stigdon, director of DCS, by June 21.Indiana House Democratic Leader Terry Goodin, D-Austin, praised investigators for talking to everyone involved in the process but said they need to be interviewing Bonaventura who brought the issue to light.Vincent said that his team hopes to speak with Bonaventura before the work is finished.Goodin also said that the state should be quick to respond to the needs identified in the report, adding, “We cannot and should not stand for anything that costs the life of one more child in Indiana.”FOOTNOTE: Quinn Fitzgerald is a reporter for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Detailed guide: Prescriptions issued in the EEA and Switzerland: guidance for pharmacists

first_img it would not ordinarily be dispensed in the UK there are doubts over its authenticity there are concerns about the clinical appropriateness of the medicine(s) for that patient it would cause any issues of health and safety Approved countries Austria Belgium Bulgaria Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Republic of Ireland Italy Latvia Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Malta The Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden Switzerland identify the prescriber in the same way that you do now. The name, professional qualifications and contact details of the prescriber (including work address, email address and telephone or fax number with the appropriate international prefix) should be clearly stated on the prescription along with the name of the country in which the prescription was issued refer to the prescribing-approved countries and professions list to check whether: SummaryFrom 1 January 2021, a prescription issued in an EEA member state (EU countries, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway) or Switzerland can be dispensed in the UK if the prescriber is from a profession recognised by this guidance that is legally entitled to issue a prescription of that kind in the country in which the prescription is issued.Actions for pharmacistsIf you are asked to dispense an EEA or Swiss prescription, you should: the prescription was issued in an approved country the prescriber is practising in a profession recognised by the UK in relation to that country These lists will be reviewed at least every 3 years from the date that the country or profession was included on the list. The government will communicate any changes in good time so that pharmacists are able to recognise and dispense prescriptions appropriately. You may contact the competent authority in the country in which the prescription was issued in order to check the registration of the prescriber and whether they are authorised to issue a prescription of that kind in that country.You may dispense the prescription if it has been issued in an approved country on the list and is signed by a qualified prescriber practising in an approved profession on the list.If the prescription is from a country or prescriber that is not on the list, you should not dispense the prescription and instead use your professional expertise to help the patient.This does not affect your right to exercise your professional discretion to refuse to dispense a prescription if any of the following apply: Emergency supplyThere is no change to supplying prescription-only medicines in an emergency at the request of the patient. See further information on emergency supply of prescriptions.Emergency supplies are also possible at the request of a prescriber who is practising in a profession and country recognised by this guidance.Medicinal products subject to special medical prescriptionThe rules relating to controlled drugs in the UK have not changed. You must not dispense a controlled drug against an EEA or Swiss prescription.A controlled drug is a product listed in schedule 1, 2 or 3 to the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001 or in schedule 1, 2 or 3 to the Misuse of Drugs Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2002.You also must not dispense ‘specials’ (unlicensed medicines that are manufactured or procured specifically to meet the special clinical needs of an individual patient) against an EEA or Swiss prescription.If you are asked to dispense an EEA or Swiss prescription listing a schedule 1 to 3 controlled drug or a special, you should advise the patient about other available treatment(s) or refer them to local health services to get a UK prescription.ReimbursementThere are no changes to reimbursement. You should dispense prescriptions from approved countries and professions as private prescriptions.Prescribing-approved countries and professions listRegulation 214(6A) of the Human Medicines Regulations 2012 (as amended by the Human Medicines (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019) refers to a list of approved countries and professions for the purpose of the definition of “approved country health professional”.Prescriptions issued by a prescriber who is practising in a listed profession in a listed country may be recognised in the UK. These professions and countries are:Approved professions doctors dentists pharmacists nurses physiotherapists chiropodists or podiatrists community nurses optometrists therapeutic radiographers paramedicslast_img read more

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Knowing where you come from

first_imgAshley’s mom.After writing my first contribution to the Bulldog, I thought about how Momma would react to it. She has dementia and lives in an assisted living facility in Tennessee, but was always sensitive to issues of spending equal time with her family. By the time I came along, when my parents were in their late 30s, most of Momma’s ten siblings had moved away from Wallen Creek in Lee County, VA where she was born and raised. Only a few family members remained in the area including my Grandmother Carroll, my Uncle Wiley and a few cousins. As one of my aunts explained to me, my Grandmother told her daughters that for them to have a better life, they must move away. My memories of the physical place are patchy at best. I remember narrow curvy mountain roads, small rough houses sitting on bare ground and terraced hillsides covered in tobacco and sorghum. From the stories I heard, most folks worked in the coal mines and practiced subsistence farming.In the summers, we would make road trips to visit so Momma could gather with her siblings at a small roadside motel in the nearby town of Jonesville. I can still hear what my Daddy called the Carroll cackle (Carroll is Momma’s maiden name). Momma and her siblings piled up in one of the hotel rooms laughing and telling stories of growing up on Wallen Creek. So many of these stories centered around their memories of watching and helping their mother prepare meals for the family table.She would harvest fresh wild greens known as garden sass or sallet. These greens likely included pokeweed, wood sorrel, sheep sorrel and bittercress. All of these were a nutritious addition to their diet. Grandmother Carroll knew and distinguished these plants at a premature stage of growth; because they should be collected early when they are tender. She knew that if you wait too long to gather them, they become tough and bitter as they get large in size. With these greens she would make something called Kilt (Killed) Salad. It is wilted greens salad with warm bacon drippings in the dressing. This salad can be easily reproduced with ingredients from the grocery store.Kilt SaladKilt SaladIngredients4 slices thick-cut bacon, cut into 1 inch pieces (lardons)2 scallions, white and green parts thinly sliced (she often used meadow onions)4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar6 cups greens (I use romaine and spinach)1 shallot, minced (optional)InstructionsHeat a cast iron skillet over medium heat, then add the bacon and cook until the fat has rendered, about 5 minutes. Put the pieces of bacon on a paper towel-lined plate. Keep the grease in the pan.Turn the heat down to medium low. Add the scallions and shallot. Saute until soft and do the same.Turn the heat to medium and add the vinegar. Stir to combine and scrape any brown bacon bits off the bottom of the pan. Pour the warm mixture over your greens and toss gently, just until slightly wilted. Add salt and pepper to taste.Serve with the bacon crumbles over top and add a fried egg to the top, if you like.NOTE: If you want to punch up the flavor, add a little dijon mustard or a splash of hot sauce to the dressing in the skillet.Saving the rendered fat from cooking bacon is a food tradition I practice today. If you take nothing else away from my cooking advice, SAVE YOUR BACON DRIPPINGS! Good bacon is expensive and the rendered bacon fat is terrific for cooking all kinds of things, so why not make use of the free grease that the bacon gives?After I cook bacon, I pour the drippings that remain in the pan through a fine mesh strainer into a jar I keep in the refrigerator. I strain it to remove any solids that might cause the saved fat to go rancid & I store it in the refrigerator to extend the shelf life. Bacon grease has a smoke point of 400F, so it is great for sautéing, pan-frying or roasting. If you combine it with canola or vegetable oil, you can raise that smoke point for recipes that require higher heat. The next time you are frying an egg or making biscuits, use some bacon grease instead of butter or other fat and don’t tell me they don’t taste better!Ashley Montgomery is a native Southerner with a deep love for collard greens, hot buttered biscuits and sweet tea. She married a boy from Maine, works at UMF and calls Wilton her home. She loves cooking, feeding people, learning about other folk’s food traditions and will eventually stop being afraid of pressure cookers.last_img read more

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