Cummins to replace injured Gabriel in WI Test squad Down Under

first_imgMELBOURNE, Australia (CMC):Barbadian fast bowler Miguel Cummins is set to make his Test debut after he was named as a replacement for the injury pacer Shannon Gabriel in the ongoing series against Australia.West Indies Cricket Board’s selection panel made the announcement yesterday following the regional side’s heavy defeat to Australia inside three days in the first Test, which ended Saturday.Cummins, 25, has taken 99 wickets at an average of 22.83 in 36 first-class matches. He has made one international appearance for West Indies, an ODI against Ireland at Sabina Park, Jamaica, in February, last year.The 27-year-old Gabriel suffered a stress reaction in his left ankle bone while bowling in the first innings of the first Test match at the Blundstone Arena in Hobart. He is expected to return to Trinidad this week to continue his rehabilitation, a WICB statement said.last_img read more

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$160M Indian Arrival Monument in Region 6 completed

first_imgThe long-awaited Indian Arrival Monument which is located at Palmyra, East Coast Berbice (ECB) has now been completed and is expected to be commissioned on April 17.Minister of Social Cohesion, Dr. George Norton and his teamThis was confirmed during a visit to the Ancient County by Social Cohesion Minister Dr. George Norton, who has responsibility for Culture, Youth and Sport.On Thursday, Minister Norton and a team from his department toured and thoroughly inspected the spanking new historic site, where they were able to have a firsthand view of the facility and to approve the quality of work carried out by the contractors.“We are going to declare open this monument site on the 17th of this month, with a representative of the High Commission and an official from the Government of Guyana. It was long over-due… Once and for all, we can say that the monument is where it is supposed to be. We know the significance of it, so we are pleased to present to the public, after the 17, the monument for their viewing,” Minister Norton noted.Director of Culture, Tamika Boatswain, who was also a part of the team, remarked that while there are some minor areas where work needs to be improved, “generally, the presentation of the site is good, and will be one Guyanese will be proud of.”The Department of Public Information (DPI) reported that Project Manager Stephon Chung stated that the project was completed on February 28, 2018 at an overall cost of $160 million.Persons travelling to Region Six can, without a doubt, testify to seeing the six impressively huge, 12-foot-tall bronze statues erected and supported by a solid base at the ‘T Junction’ located just off the Berbice River Bridge’s entrance. The immense exhibit depicts a child, two women and three men performing their daily duties.The six statues have a value of $31 million (US$150,000). It was a donation made by the Government of India to Guyana in 2017.The APNU+AFC Government had intended to declare the monument site open at least before December of 2018, since the project was high on its national agenda. However, after assuming office in 2015, the Government discovered numerous faults to the design built by the previous administration, which had to be revised.Additionally, in April of last year, months before the sculptures were installed, the base which was constructed to support the six statues had collapsed. According to Chung, this incident was one which contributed to the delay of the project’s completion.last_img read more

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Huskies trip to Grande Prairie a no go

first_imgThe Fort St. John Huskies had to forfeit their final game of the regular season.The pups were scheduled to travel to Grande Prairie to end their season with the Wheelers, but were unable to fill a full roster.Teams in the NWJHL must have nine players on their roster, or they are forced to forfeit the game. Sunday, the Huskies could only find seven players to take the trip to Grande Prairie. – Advertisement -Fortunately, the Huskies clinched fifth last night by beating the Blades, making today’s game meaningless in the standings.last_img

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Saugus graduate remains in Trojans’ pitching rotation

first_imgA year after being the most successful part of the USC baseball team’s weekend pitching rotation, Tommy Milone is notably absent from the first few weekends of this season. The Trojans want to make it clear Milone, a Saugus High graduate, hasn’t been demoted and he could return to the weekend rotation. The Trojans had intended to start Milone last Sunday, but his high pitch count in season opener earlier in the week forced a change of plans. `We wanted to win the very first game the most,” Lawn said. `So we started him against Cal Poly. By virtue of using up the maximum pitch total in that game, we weren’t going to bring him back for the weekend. He did pretty much the same thing this week, so he won’t start this weekend. He’ll probably start (Tuesday) against Pepperdine, so we’ll go from there…. We’ve got probably four or five guys who are interchangeable.” USC faces No. 17 San Diego this weekend. The Trojans entered the series with a 3-2 record. Clutch Curtis: Hart product John Curtis was Cal State Fullerton’s second-leading hitter during the Titans’ season-opening sweep of Stanford last weekend. Curtis, a senior catcher, hit .556 with five RBIs in the three-game series. Curtis and the No. 12 Titans play at UNLV this weekend. `That’s a real good chance,” USC pitching coach Dave Lawn said. Milone earned his second win of the season Tuesday when he allowed six hits in six innings in a 5-2 victory over Loyola Marymount. The sophomore left-hander is 2-0 with a 3.00 ERA, 12 strikeouts and two walks in 12 innings. center_img Susdorf producing again: Hart graduate Steve Susdorf entered the weekend leading Fresno State in RBIs, having driven in four runs on four hits through the Bulldogs’ first four games. Fresno State plays at Stanford this weekend, then faces Cal State Northridge on Tuesday Not their day: If not for Saturday doubleheaders, The Master’s College would be off to a pretty good start. The Mustangs are winless on Saturdays, having lost doubleheaders the past two Saturdays, but are undefeated any other day of the week. The Masters’ tries to end the Saturday losing trend today, but it won’t be easy. The Mustangs travel to Riverside for a doubleheader against Cal Baptist starting at 11 a.m. Cal Baptist is the defending Golden State Athletic Conference champion and is off to another successful start at 8-0. The Master’s improved to 3-4 by defeating Claremont 7-4 on Tuesday, the final tuneup before today’s GSAC opener. heather.gripp@dailynews.com (818) 713-3607 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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Alaska Highway re-opens after collision blocked traffic for hours

first_imgAfter hours of closure, the Alaska Highway has reopened, as confirmed by YRB North Peace and DriveBC.An accident involving  a logging truck and a car just before 9 AM this morning closed the highway in both directions for hours.The accident happened near Mile 60, north of Charlie Lake.- Advertisement -A detour route via the Montney Hwy 114 and Beatton/Montney Rd 271 was available for drivers during most of the day.The Fort St. John RCMP, the Peace Regional Traffic Services, the Collision Reconstructionist, and other support units are attending the scene to actively investigate this incident.last_img

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WEATHER WARNING: MOTORISTS TOLD TO STAY AWAY FROM DONEGAL TOWN QUAY

first_imgThe tourist office in Donegal Town three weeks ago Pic by Rory O’Donnell.Donegal County Council is once again urging members of the public to take extra care this weekend with extreme weather conditions forecasted for the next few days – and warned motorists to avoid the quay in Donegal Town.There is potential for high coastal flood risks due to very high spring tides, high waves, low pressure and onshore winds.A yellow alert is in place for today – with an orange alert for Saturday and Sunday. Members of the public are being asked to exercise caution particularly in areas adjacent to the coastline and areas which are susceptible to coastal flooding.  In particular we are urging people to stay away from seawalls and coastal areas during high seas and high tides.In Donegal Town, Donegal County Council is asking members of the public not to leave their cars parked in the Quay car park over the weekend.  The Council will be closing this car park from Friday evening and it is likely to remain closed for the rest of the weekend.Sandbags will be made available to the public on a needs basis from the Councils depots throughout the county.  You can also contact the Council during business hours at 074 91 53900.The Council will continue to monitor conditions and staff are on standby over the weekend to respond to emergency call outs. In the event of an out of hours emergency call 074 9172288 for Roads Service or 074 91 72399 for Water Service.To keep up to date on all road conditions this Winter follow us on Twitter @roadsdcc or @donegalcouncil or on our Facebook page. WEATHER WARNING: MOTORISTS TOLD TO STAY AWAY FROM DONEGAL TOWN QUAY was last modified: January 31st, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:quayweather warninglast_img read more

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Being a Christian in Academia Can Be Costly

first_imgWhat happened to a Christian on his journey to a PhD is shocking and shameful, but his situation was far from unique.Corey Miller finally decided to tell his story. On his path to a PhD in philosophy, he was blocked, persecuted, censored and shamed repeatedly. Why? Because he couldn’t fulfill the academic requirements? No. He titles his article in The College Fix, “I was forced out of my PhD program because of my open faith in Jesus Christ. Here’s my story.” Proceeding from undergrad to PhD as a Christian was a continual battle. Here are some of types of censorship and persecution he endured:Told to shut up from sharing his Christian views in a freshman class, and given an F.Received prank calls at 3 in the morning from classmates mocking his faith.Called schizophrenic and delusional by his psychology professor.Dropped by an atheist grad advisor and forbidden to proceed in his PhD studies.As an adjunct professor, was threatened by professors and students.*Forced to go overseas to complete his PhD.“Following these experiences as an undergrad, grad, and professor, I realized how hostile universities can be at all layers of strata if you don’t believe the right doctrines. Higher education has become so thoroughly secularized that an alternate viewpoint is foreign, unwelcome, attacked and pushed out. Ultimately I finished my PhD in philosophical theology from the University of Aberdeen in Scotland in 2014.”*He was exonerated from accusations by students and professors with help from the ADF (Alliance Defending Freedom), but the persecution continued.The censors were relentless. When Miller was outspoken about his faith, he was censored. When he was secretive about his faith, he was outed and censored. When he tried the Trojan Horse approach (enter academia and become one of them), he was outed and censored. It had nothing to do with his qualifications. The reason was the intolerant, profoundly anti-Christian bias in academia:Surveys often show the ratio of liberal to conservative professors for those over age 65 preparing to retire is 12:1. For the new scholars coming in under age 36 it is 23:1. In some departments it is literally 70:1. There is a light at the end of the tunnel and it is an oncoming train.Marxists, LGBT activists, and leftists get a free pass to say anything they want on most college campuses. Christians, however, face harassment, persecution and censorship. Given his experience, Miller decided to do something about it.Instead of a Trojan Horse approach, today I fight with a full frontal assault. Shortly after earning my PhD I became president and CEO of Ratio Christi: Campus Apologetics Alliance.Miller sees the situation as a fight, not just for freedom to speak up for Christian faith on college campuses, but to preserve the very existence of a Christian voice there. It’s a fight for our culture and civilization as well, he warns.We believe not only in defending the faith, but also in defending the ability to defend the faith, whether it is speech codes, speech zones, denial of campus funds, or variant all-comers policies where we cannot get clubs approved if we insist on our leaders being Christians.We’ve been involved in at least 17 cases of legal proceedings, won a federal victory at one university and recently won another this month.Slaughtering, Silencing, and Censoring the Darwin SkepticsOne of our contributing writers, Jerry Bergman, alerted the editor of CEH about Miller’s story that was published May 22. Dr Bergman knows a lot about persecution of Christians and creationists in academia. For 30 years, he has gathered case studies similar to Miller’s, and has published them in books and articles. His first major book on this subject, Slaughter of the Dissidents: The Shocking Truth About Killing the Careers of Darwin Doubters (2008, 475 pages), with 45 five-star reviews on Amazon, shocked readers with accounts of more than ten famous persons who suffered the unfairness and censure of Darwinists in academia and the press.As the university goes, so goes the culture. The university is the most influential institution in western civilization. From it come our doctors, lawyers, political leaders, journalists, artists, k-12 educators and even future professors. Stalin once said “ideas are more powerful than weapons. We don’t allow our enemies to have weapons. Why should we let them have ideas?” And Abraham Lincoln said, “the philosophy in the classroom in one generation will be the philosophy of government in the next.” —Corey MillerBergman’s second book, Silencing the Darwin Skeptics: The War Against Theists (2012, 385 pages) added five more lengthy accounts of additional victims, plus short accounts of 15 more. In addition, this book called out specific institutions for persistent violations of rights of “Darwin skeptics”— a term broader than just Christians, creationists or theists. Darwin skeptics include anyone who doubts the secular consensus that Darwinian evolution is capable of explaining the world and the universe. Bergman also shows why appeals to the typical legal organizations that are supposed to protect our rights (ACLU, NEA, and AAUP) usually fail, because those organizations are just as hostile as the Darwinists in academia, as are the courts. Most interesting in this book are discussions of the tactics these totalitarians use to ridicule and silence those who refuse to bow the knee to St. Darwin. Bergman compares these tactics to those used by the Nazis.“Christians largely founded the university as a prominent feature of western civilization. But today we fight for our right to exist on the campus. The powers of secularism don’t lose any sleep over Christian marginalization. But Christians who sleep rather than fight for our right sacrifice not only our voice, but that of western civilization.” —Corey MillerThe third book in the series, Censoring the Darwin Skeptics: How Belief in Evolution Is Enforced by Eliminating Dissidents (2018, 495 pages), contains all new material, providing a strong capstone to the whole trilogy. Eight new case studies are presented in detail, but before them, Bergman reveals the tactics of the censors. For ten chapters, he describes pervasive censorship against Darwin doubters in our society and how the perpetrators do it everywhere, using tactics both subtle and blatant. For instance, bookstores and libraries hide intelligent design books written by PhD scientists in the religion section, but showcase Darwinist books by atheists like Richard Dawkins in the science section. Reporters grab boilerplate pro-Darwin, anti-creationist text for their stories, and rely on Darwinist talking points whenever discussing views skeptical of Darwinism. Schools give failing grades and even oust students who try to present non-Darwinian material in class. Universities deny grants, research results and internet access to Darwin skeptics. State legislatures deny accreditation to institutions wanting to teach creation or ID. Peer reviewers refuse to publish results critical of Darwin (that tactic and pre-censorship of textbooks ensures that students and researchers never even get exposed to alternate ideas). With all this disturbing documentation, Bergman also asks, “Is theistic evolution a solution?” The answer, surprisingly, is “No.” The Darwin-only dogmatists are just as hostile to compromisers!The author of the New Testament letter to the Hebrews said, “In your struggle against sin you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding your blood” (Hebrews 12:4). Could it come to that? One of the suspects in the Colorado school shooting May 8 hated Christians and President Trump, WND reported but praised Obama. His accomplice was transitioning from female to male, says the NY Times. This is not the first deadly attack in America motivated by anti-Christian hate, nor will it likely be the last.The wealth of referenced documentation Dr Bergman has provided in these three large volumes should be a call to arms. Our society prides itself on free speech, free expression, and freedom of conscience. Any student or employee who meets the requirements and passes the tests should be respected, but when it comes to evolution, only one view is allowed. Darwinists are rigid totalitarians. Students are not allowed to question Darwinism and the scientific materialism it entails, and if they do, the consequences to their careers and reputations can be dire. Bergman describes how David Coppedge was accused of “harassment” at JPL for merely sharing material on intelligent design with friendly co-workers. For that infraction, he was demoted, threatened and eventually fired despite a 14-year good work record. Defending himself in court, even with ADF’s help, cost him tens of thousands of dollars of his own money, and close to a million dollars in lost income he would have earned before his planned retirement. A liberal judge ruled against him with no explanation, and then ordered Coppedge to pay JPL’s court costs of $51,000. Out of work and facing cancer surgery, he had no choice but to drop his right of appeal in exchange for not having to pay the court costs (as if JPL’s well-paid lawyers and international legal team needed the money). “The Coppedge case illustrates with gut-wrenching clarity,” Bergman writes, “the behind-the-scenes deceit and plotting we have similarly observed while reviewing many of the cases presented in this trilogy” (p. 371).Get these books, especially the most recent one, Censoring the Darwin Skeptics. Know what the Darwin doubters are up against. The same tactics continue today against Darwin skeptics and against our entire cultural history, founded as it was on the self-evident principle that we are “created equal,” and “endowed by our Creator” with unalienable rights. But like the censors in 1984, Darwinians rewrite history in their own terms, blotting out the memory of great scientists opposing Darwinism, and using every shenanigan they can to prevent impressionable students from hearing alternatives. Empowered by unions, lawyers, courts, the press, journals, professors and even the government sometimes, the totalitarian Darwinist empire seems impregnable. The task of speaking out seems daunting. While we have some avenues remaining to fight (like the internet, with CEH as an example), we must take advantage of them. Would that more had Corey Miller’s spirit that this is no longer time for a Trojan Horse approach; it is time for a full frontal assault. Go into it well armed, because knowledge is power.(Visited 773 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Photo library: Tourism and leisure 10

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Tourism & Leisure contact sheet (1.1MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Stellenbosch, Western Cape province: An outdoor restaurant at Blaauwklippen Wine Estate.Photo: Stellenbosch WineRoutes » Download high-res image Stellenbosch, Western Cape province: An outdoor restaurant at Dornier Wine Cellar.Photo: Stellenbosch WineRoutes » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Tourists at the Hector Pieterson Memorial in Soweto, which is named after the 14-year-old boy who was the first killed by police in the June 16 1976 students’ uprising. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Gauteng province: Frontview of the state-of-the-art Maropeng visitors’ centre at the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, which is famous for the wealth of early human fossils found there.Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Gauteng province: Back view of the state-of-the-art Maropeng visitors’ centre at the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, which is famous for the wealth of early human fossils found there. Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image East London, Eastern Cape province: The yacht marina on the seafront. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape province: Sunset over the beachfront sees people running, walking, fishing and cycling to end off the day. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape province: Sunset over the beachfront sees people running, walking, fishing and cycling to end off the day. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape province: Sunset over the beachfront sees people running, walking, fishing and cycling to end off the day. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image TOURISM AND LEISURE 10:{loadposition tourism}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.last_img read more

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Geoscientists aim to magnify specialized Web searching

first_imgOver the next 2 years, Wiebe and colleagues will build computer programs that can extract information from AGU conference abstracts, NSF awards, and geoscience data repositories and then digitally connect these resources in ways that make them more accessible to scientists. A pilot project that concluded this year, known as OceanLink, has already developed some of the underlying design. If the new project garners sufficient community interest, the researchers could eventually turn it into a comprehensive one-stop search hub for the geosciences, says computer scientist Tom Narock of Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia, another principal investigator on the project.Projects like GeoLink are part of a growing effort by the scientific community to make literature reviews more efficient by leveraging the increasing ability of computers to process texts—a much needed service as millions of new papers come out every year. A similar initiative from the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (AI2) in Seattle, Washington, is developing an intelligent academic search engine for computer science. Called Semantic Scholar, it is expected to be fully released by the end of 2015. Eventually, the institute plans to expand Semantic Scholar’s coverage to include other subjects, says AI2 Chief Executive Officer Oren Etzioni.Existing academic search engines boast extensive coverage of scientific literature. (Google Scholar alone indexes about 160 million documents by some calculations.) Their reliance on keyword searches, however, often means users get more junk than treasure. That frustrates scientists such as Wiebe, who wants to find papers related to specific research questions such as “growth of plankton in the Red Sea.” Search engines also don’t typically include raw data sets.In contrast, GeoLink and Semantic Scholar attempt to build fine-grained, niche search engines catered to specific subject areas, by tapping into deeper semantic processing that helps computers establish scientifically meaningful connections between publications. When a scientist types in “plankton in the Red Sea,” for example, the search engine would not only understand it as a string of characters that show up on papers, but also know the researchers who investigated the topic, the cruises they took, the instruments they used, and the data sets and papers they published. Google has applied similar techniques to improve its main search engine, but projects like GeoLink benefit from input from scientists with extensive knowledge in the subject area, who identify meaningful links that computer scientists then translate into code.The potential of these projects goes beyond helping scientists find the right papers quickly, says computer scientist C. Lee Giles of Pennsylvania State University, University Park. By extracting information on methods and results from a paper and pooling the data together, search engines like Semantic Scholar could automate the process of literature review and comparison.For example, Etzioni says, it would take a talented computer science graduate student weeks of extensive reading to gain an overview of techniques used in the last 5 years to perform dependent parsing (a task in natural language processing), the data sets produced, and the accuracy rates. And they’d probably miss a few things. In contrast, Semantic Scholar could potentially compile the techniques and results into a neat table within seconds. “We are imagining techniques that go way beyond just paper recommendation, to the point where we are really generating novel insights.”Such instant overview would especially benefit junior scientists and interdisciplinary scientists who are entering a new field of study, says computer scientist Christina Lioma of the University of Copenhagen. It would also enable scientists to identify emerging trends in a field and adjust their directions accordingly, Giles says.Realizing the technology’s potential, however, partially depends on having publicly accessible, text-minable literature for computers to read. Although governments are increasingly pushing for such open access, allowing machines to mine the full texts of papers held behind journal paywalls remains a contentious issue. For now, the GeoLink project will mine only publicly available abstracts of studies. (Semantic Scholar receives its papers from CiteSeerx, a digital library co-founded by Giles that covers 4 million open-access computer science papers.)Computer scientists still have a lot of work to do to improve the accuracy of text processing, Giles says. For example, machines still trip up over tasks like identifying that “P. Wiebe” and “Peter Wiebe” refer to the same person.Nonetheless, Giles believes that the semantic Web approach “is the Web of the future.” When oceanographer Peter Wiebe sat down recently to write a paper on findings from his January cruise to the Red Sea, he wanted to examine all data sets on plankton in the region. He knew other researchers have been sampling the organisms for years, but there was a problem: He didn’t know where to find those data sets.“These data centers are kind of black holes,” says Wiebe, who works at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. “The data go in, but it’s very hard to figure out what’s in there and to get it out.”That could soon change. Wiebe is working with a group of computer scientists to lay the groundwork for a smarter academic search engine that would help geoscientists find the exact data sets and publications they want in the blink of an eye, instead of spending hours scrolling through pages of irrelevant results on Google Scholar. The group officially kicked off their project, called GeoLink, yesterday at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) fall meeting in San Francisco, California. The research effort is part of EarthCube, an initiative funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to upgrade cyberinfrastructure for the geosciences.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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