Nebraska 4-Star Transfer Issues Message For Huskers Fans

first_imgA general view of Memorial Stadium during a game between the Nebraska Cornhuskers and the Wyoming Cowboys.LINCOLN, NE – SEPTEMBER 10: A general view of Memorial Stadium during a game between the Nebraska Cornhuskers and the Wyoming Cowboys on September 10, 2016 in Lincoln, Nebraska. Nebraska defeated Wyoming 52-14. (Photo by Steven Branscombe/Getty Images)It’s been a tough season for Nebraska, highlighted by their winless record so far. However, more unfortunate news struck the Cornhuskers in the form of a huge transfer.Earlier this week, Tyjon Lindsey received his scholarship release, as the former four-star recruit is ready to transfer. Although he’s ready to start a new chapter at Oregon State, the potential-packed wideout didn’t forget to say goodbye to his supporters at Nebraska.This heartfelt message proves Lindsey will miss his time with the Cornhuskers, but he’ll embrace his new opportunity to shine on Saturdays.Thank you @HuskerFBNation and the TRUE GBR FANS who’ve shown me nothing but unconditional love and a warm welcoming when I first arrived on campus. ?The Marathon must continue… pic.twitter.com/T6SiqIBtsq— T-WAYNE (@tyjonlindsey) October 8, 2018Last season, Lindsey finished with 12 receptions for 76 yards as a freshman. In his time on the gridiron this year, he had three catches for 22 yards.The Cornhuskers will continue relying on JD Spielman and Morgan Stanley Jr. on the outside. Nonetheless, losing a gifted athlete like Lindsey isn’t ideal for Scott Frost in his first season at Nebraska.last_img read more

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As Wall Street spasmed with fear 401k savers held steady

NEW YORK — While professional traders on Wall Street scrambled to sell stocks amid a fear-fueled, nearly 20 per cent drop for the S&P 500 late last year, most people at home remained relatively calm when it came to their own retirement savings.So say numbers from Fidelity Investments, which show that the vast majority of 401(k) participants continued to sock savings away in their accounts and refrained from the perhaps-tempting choice to abandon stocks and hide out in the safety of cash.Investors held the steadfast approach even as the average 401(k) balance dropped to $95,600 by the end of the year, down 10 per cent from three months earlier. The chief culprit was a fear about a possible recession, which sent the S&P 500 down 19.8 per cent between setting its latest record high on Sept. 20 and hitting a bottom on Christmas Eve.It’s an encouraging sign because stocks have historically provided the best returns over the long term. So, as long as someone is willing to stomach such bouts of volatility and hold on for years, owning stocks is one of the best ways an investor can have a bigger pot to pay for retirement.“The most encouraging thing is that most people didn’t have a knee-jerk reaction, and they continued to save or increased their savings rates” said Jeanne Thompson, senior vice-president at Fidelity. “This is the proof that the messaging has gone through. We’ve come a long way in the last 10 years.”Much of the credit goes to one of the most powerful forces in investing: inertia. People often lean toward making no changes, particularly when it involves something as big and complicated as saving for retirement. Employers and the investment industry have tried to harness that for good by automatically enrolling workers into 401(k) plans, automatically setting them up to increase their contributions each year and automatically placing their savings into target-date retirement funds.That way, if workers take no action with their 401(k) accounts, they’re still saving a portion of each paycheque and putting their money into investments that are appropriate for their age. Last quarter, 99.1 per cent of all 401(k) participants at Fidelity continued to regularly contribute, the highest percentage since early 2011.Target-date funds take care of how to divvy up an investor’s nest egg, and they keep a lot of money in stocks when retirement is decades away and shift to more bonds as time goes on. That allows savers to put the investment decisions on auto-pilot, and only 5.6 per cent of Fidelity’s 401(k) investors changed how their assets were divvied up during the fourth quarter.“The market went down,” Thompson said, “but in terms of employees’ behaviour, it continues to remain incredibly positive.”Stan Choe, The Associated Press read more

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