Arsenal’s full list of released players has been confirmed

first_imgThe Gunners had earlier announced the departures of big names Santi Cazorla, Per Mertesacker and Jack Wilshere, however seeing this made official on Sunday will bring tears to the eyes of some Arsenal fans.Cazorla has been at the club since 2012, Mertesacker since 2011 and Wilshere since 2001 – he joined at the age of nine. 3 Wilshere confirmed that Emery made it clear he is not part of his future plans Cazorla suffered badly with injuries during his time at the club 3 Arsenal have confirmed their full released list ahead of the 2018/19 season.New manager Unai Emery has come in and already ousted some major names, so the club are set for an overhaul ahead of the next Premier League campaign. Standard annual footballer contracts run from July 1 to June 30 each year meaning that, come July 1 2018, all of the following players are going to be free agents:Marc BolaSanti CazorlaAlex CreanVlad DragomirAaron EyomaYassin FortuneRyan HuddartChiori JohnsonHugo KetoPer MertesackerTafari MooreJack Wilshere 3 Mertesacker has retired and will take charge of Arsenal’s youth academy next season.last_img read more

See More

‘I was over-extending myself’ – Daniel O’Donnell reveals how he suffered from exhaustion

first_imgDaniel O’Donnell has revealed how he suffered from exhaustion in the 1990s. The Kincasslagh man, 57, said he was doing ‘simply too much work’ as he shared the most important things he’s learnt through his life speaking to the Irish Mirror.He said: “In the 1990s I suffered exhaustion. I think it was simply too much work – I was over-extending myself. I was hoarse and just couldn’t get singing. Maybe we have an in-built mechanism that saves us from things, and the only way to make me stop was for my voice to go.That’s what I needed. I took time out – I went to a singing teacher and also to a gym, which I hated, so that didn’t continue!It took me a while to build up again, but I learnt from it. Before that, I would go to the opening of an envelope.“Now I limit what I do.” However, that hasn’t stopped the 57-year-old from releasing a new album with over 60 tracks!“My new album Halfway To Paradise contains 60 tracks over 3 CDs, with tributes to The Beatles, Elvis and Cliff Richard.“The music is very much from the rock ‘n’ roll 50s and 60s.”The Donegal sensation also revealed the love for Donegal’s Mary From Dungloe Festival.“I grew up in Donegal and I enjoy what this area offers. This is where I live and this is where I became what I am. “It’s a rural community and I know all the people and they know me. I’m in the country and by the sea – the Atlantic Ocean is just in front of me.“It’s beautiful. I love getting involved in local community events, and I get as much pleasure singing for 10 people at a local festival as I do for 1,000 in a concert hall.“I take part in the Mary From Dungloe Festival every year. My wife Majella and I dressed up…“I don’t even know what we were supposed to be, it was just something they gave us – maybe a prince and princess. “We were on a float waving to everyone and Olivia, my four-year-old granddaughter, came on the float with us for a bit.“My greatest passion in life is my family.“Majella has two kids, who have been such a joy to me.“Siobhan now has children of her own – Olivia and 18-month-old Archie, and I chat to them on WhatsApp every day.“I know it’s not the same as a hug, but God it’s great to see them and for them to see us.“We’re lucky they don’t live too far away, so we physically see them too.”‘I was over-extending myself’ – Daniel O’Donnell reveals how he suffered from exhaustion was last modified: October 6th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

See More

9 months agoJuventus lodge new appeal for 2005/06 Serie A title removed from Inter Milan

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Juventus lodge new appeal for 2005/06 Serie A title removed from Inter Milanby Carlos Volcano9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveJuventus have lodged a new appeal to have the 2005/06 Serie A title removed from Inter Milan.During the Calciopoli scandal of 2006, Juve had two Scudetti revoked – the 2004/05 title went unassigned, while the 2005/06 title was handed to third-place Inter.This was due to AC Milan, who had finished second, also being docked points in the trial, along with Lazio, Fiorentina, Reggina and Arezzo.Juventus have had several appeals rejected to have the titles returned, or at least the later trophy taken away from Inter.On Saturday, Juve formally lodged another appeal with the Collegio di Garanzia dello Sport tribunal. last_img read more

See More

Toshiba CEO promises turnaround in 5 years beefed up ethics

first_imgTOKYO – Nobuaki Kurumatani, the outsider tapped to lead scandal-tarnished Japanese electronics company Toshiba Corp., is promising a turnaround in five years by reshaping its operations and boosting profitability.Kurumatani, the first outsider to be appointed chief executive at Toshiba in more than half a century, acknowledged the system of governance and risk management had been weak. He stressed he brought to the company his experience in the financial sector, where compliance controls were tougher.Toshiba has been embroiled in an accounting scandal involving massive doctoring of books.“I feel that the organization is determined to change,” Kurumatani told reporters Tuesday at Toshiba’s Tokyo headquarters.Toshiba has also racked up heavy losses in its nuclear business and is selling its lucrative computer-chip business to avoid going belly-up.At the centre of the losses is the acquisition of CB&I Stone & Webster by its U.S. nuclear unit Westinghouse, which filed for bankruptcy protection last year.Kurumatani said the company will withdraw from all overseas nuclear operations, and the future of the energy business is moving toward renewables.Costs of building nuclear reactors have surged due to beefed-up safety measures after a March 2011 accident at a plant in Fukushima in northeastern Japan sent three reactors into meltdowns.“Toshiba has many dedicated employees and talented engineers,” Kurumutani said. “Things go well when things are good. But once things start going wrong, then it keeps going wrong.”Toshiba’s chairman stepped down last year, but veteran Satoshi Tsunakwa has stayed on as president and chief operating officer and will be working with Kurumatani toward a turnaround.Kurumatani’s rise is an effort by Toshiba to put on a fresh face to a long-pristine brand that has plunged from grace not only over the Westinghouse fiasco but also because of spiraling accounting scandals that raised serious questions about its ethical practices.Efforts to reform corporate governance turned up more embarrassing wrongdoing, which dated back years.A graduate of the prestigious University of Tokyo, Kurumatani most recently served as president of CVC Asia Pacific Japan, an investment fund.Before that, he was deputy president and a director at Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group, one of Japan’s biggest banking institutions and a major Toshiba lender.Unlike previous Toshiba executives with backgrounds in engineering, Kurumatani built his career in corporate planning, public relations and auditing.Toshiba has been gradually selling off pieces of its operations, such as its medical equipment and household appliance businesses.But the key sale is its prized flash memory chip business to a consortium led by Bain Capital Private Equity. That sale was initially set to be completed in March but is ongoing, awaiting regulatory approval in China, according to Kurumatani.Toshiba has reached a settlement with American computer data storage giant Western Digital, its joint venture partner, which had initially fought the sale.Toshiba still has a sprawling infrastructure business, such as railways, power systems and factory automation. It’s still responsible for running and decommissioning dozens of nuclear reactors in Japan, including those at the Fukushima plant.Toshiba is forecasting a profit for the fiscal year that ended in March, a reversal from the red ink it had expected earlier. It racked up a loss for the previous fiscal year.___Follow Yuri Kageyama on Twitter at https://twitter.com/yurikageyamaHer work can be found at https://www.apnews.com/search/yuri%20kageyamalast_img read more

See More

Canada Goose shares up after betterthanexpected results plans for new stores

first_imgTORONTO – Shares of Canada Goose Holdings Inc. rose more than 30 per cent on Friday after it reported stronger-than-expected earnings and announced plans for three new stores in North America.Canada Goose stock closed up $18.02 at $78.01 on the Toronto Stock Exchange.The increase came after the luxury parka maker reported a fourth-quarter profit of $8.1 million or seven cents per diluted share compared with a loss of $23.4 million or 23 cents per diluted share a year ago.Revenue for the quarter ended March 31 totalled $124.8 million, up from $51.1 million in the same quarter a year earlier.On an adjusted basis, Canada Goose said it earned $9.9 million or nine cents per diluted share.Economists on average had expected a loss of eight cents per share for the quarter, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.Canada Goose also announced Friday that it would open new stores in Short Hills, N.J., Montreal and Vancouver this fall as part of its retail expansion plan.The locations are expected to open ahead of the 2018 holiday shopping season.For its full financial year, Canada Goose says it earned $96.1 million or 86 cents per diluted share on $591.2 million in revenue. That compared with a profit of $21.0 million or 21 cents per share on $403.8 million in revenue in the previous year.Companies in this story: (TSX:GOOS)last_img read more

See More

Resource firm planning new NB wells if Tories lift fracking moratorium

first_imgFREDERICTON — A major player in natural gas development in New Brunswick is making plans for new wells if the province’s new Tory government follows through on a pledge to lift a moratorium on fracking.Corridor Resources currently has 32 producing wells in the Sussex area and operates a 50 kilometre pipeline, a gathering system comprising 15 kilometres of pipe, and a natural gas processing facility.The company wants to expand but the previous Liberal government imposed a moratorium in 2014 that prohibits hydraulic fracturing — a process that involves pumping water and chemicals at high pressure to fracture shale rock and release gas.The new Tory government has proposed lifting the moratorium in specific areas, like the Sussex region, if there is public support.In a corporate presentation the company says, if the moratorium is lifted, they would drill five vertical evaluation wells, complete three existing wells, identify “sweet spots,” and drill a second round of up to five horizontal wells.The company says with the impending end of Nova Scotia’s offshore production, natural gas will have to come from outside the Maritimes if the New Brunswick deposit is not further developed.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

See More

Crews working to extinguish forest fire near the Site C Dam

first_imgThe smoke covering Fort St. John is coming from the fire that is currently uncontrolled.If the current fire suppression doesn’t work, more crews will be brought in to fight the fire Thursday.There is another fire northwest of Fort St. John, that is approximately 100 hectares in size.  The fire isn’t creating a lot of smoke today and crews are working to put out that fire.If you have any information about forest fires in our region, email news@moosefm.ca.  You can also send along any pictures or video as well. UPDATE as of 5:45 p.m. – B.C. Hydro has confirmed the fire is located approximately 3.5km upstream from the Site C Dam project.  At this time there is no concern for the workers on site or the worker accommodation.  Hydro and the B.C. Wildfire Service are monitoring the situation and their first priority is the safety of workers on site and the public.  Hydro was burning waste wood debris on Friday and Saturday near Tea Island.  The cause of Wednesday’s fire is unknown at this time.FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Crews from the Forest Fire Service and B.C. Hydro are working to contain a fire near the Site C Dam.The fire broke out on Wednesday and is approximately 4 hectares in size.  Crews from the Forest Service and B.C. Hydro are working to contain the fire and B.C. Hydro has hired a helicopter to help with the suppression efforts.last_img read more

See More

Woman reported missing in Fort St John

first_imgBrown is described as First Nations, standing 5’4″ tall, with a slim build, and medium-length brown hair.Anyone with information about her whereabouts is asked to call the Fort St. John RCMP at (250) 787-8100, or Crime Stoppers at 1 (800) 222-8477 (TIPS). UPDATE – As of 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sadie Brown has been located.  The RCMP would like to thank the public for their help.FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John RCMP are asking for the public’s help in the search for a woman who was reported missing last Friday.54-year-old Sadie Brown was last seen at her home in Fort St. John early Friday morning before her roommate left for work. She requires a walker to get around, and is said to suffer from memory loss stemming from a previous medical incident.last_img

See More

PRRD to allow residents to remove vehicles used for work from Old

first_imgFor more information on the permit, click here.The Regional District is also reminding residents to respect and obey security checkpoints.  The slide is still active and the community remains under an evacuation order.  In a posting on the PRRD website, the District says “Security has been put in place to ensure the security of residences left unattended, and to know the number of contractors that working in the area restoring utilities.  Entry permits can be obtained from the PRRD; this is so that the PRRD knows who is in the evacuation area.” FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Peace River Regional District will start to issue permits to residents of the Old Fort so they can remove work vehicles from the community.The PRRD says if you have a 4×4 vehicle that is still in the community of Old Fort that sustains a business, you can contact the PRRD at 250-784-3200 and they will look at issuing entry permits to remove those vehicles.“The passage for getting out of the community location is a 4×4 road, so please take this into consideration before you submit your permit application.”last_img read more

See More

Ohio State panel illuminates discussion on paying college athletes

Vince Doria (far right), Matt Mitten (second from right), Joe Nocera (second from left), and Andrew Zimbalist (far left) are introduced on Friday at the Sports Society Initiative’s forum on paying college athletes. Credit: Mitch Hooper | Lantern reporterThe topic of financial compensation for collegiate student-athletes has been sweeping the nation in recent years, and on Friday, Ohio State, home to one of the country’s most profitable athletic departments, was at the forefront of that discussion.Two separate panel discussions — the first featuring sports policy analysts and writers, and the second consisting of seven former Buckeye athletes — were held on campus in an event organized by the university’s Sports and Society Initiative. The three-hour conversation, titled “Paying College Athletes,” encompassed nearly all sides of the debate, from legal and political angles, to methods and realities of implementation, and to athlete testimonies and alternatives. Dialogue among the panel members was passionate, insightful and respectful, although it jumped around frequently. Yet, that is inherent with any conversation about financial compensation for student-athletes. The issue is so complex, like splitting the atom, that any discussion on it could seem scattered because there are myriad factors to consider and understand.Kristin Watt, an attorney and former OSU basketball player in the 1980s, does not support a pay-to-play model, but she, like the few other panelists with a similar position, completely acknowledged the inequities in the current system. Although she said there likely will be inequities no matter what, there are “absolutely” problems that can be fixed.“Forums like this, I really want to congratulate Ohio State for putting this on,” said Watt, who was on the second panel. “The more we talk about it, the more issues get out and the more people get educated … That’s what helps spur changes.” A high point during the event was when former OSU running back Maurice Clarett delivered his opening statement. Despite his dominant freshman season for the Buckeyes in 2002, Clarett is infamous for his off-the-field tribulations, which included accepting improper benefits that played a role in his dismissal from the university and spending more than three years in prison on multiple charges. When Clarett spoke, the some hundred people in the audience were captivated, clinging to his every word. Clarett said he “absolutely” supports a pay-for-play model for collegiate athletes, citing his personal story as evidence. Growing up in the poverty in Youngstown, Ohio, Clarett said he took money under the table to help him pay personal expenses, namely fixing his car’s transmission. “My spiral of events wouldn’t have happen if I had money,” Clarett said passionately. Clarett said his situation — coming from poverty and needing support beyond just an academic scholarship — is no anomaly. Clarett also spoke poignantly about the lack of emphasis that some programs place on education. Clarett said he was nowhere near the education level needed at OSU and that he was shuffled through classes just to stay eligible. This is common, Clarett said, with those coming from inner city schools. At one point, amid the Youngstown native’s emotional soliloquy on academics, Lawrence Funderburke, a panelist and former OSU basketball player, interpreted. “Preach it,” he said. “Keep preaching.”As Clarett’s opening statement wrapped up, a few members of the audience stood up, applauding. Vince Doria, former Senior Vice President and Director of News at ESPN, started the discussion on the first panel. Doria, an OSU graduate, acknowledged his past employer’s role in the growth of big-time college athletics through massive television deals, yet he said he supports a pay-to-play system. His proposal contains different tiers of payment for players in revenue sports based mostly on playing time. It might not be perfect, Doria said, but at the very least, it “begins to address the unfairness of the current system.” A key portion of Doria’s rationale for supporting additional compensation beyond academic scholarship is that the notion of providing education is misleading, he said. “A scholarship is really the opportunity to achieve an education,” he said. Doria said with the vigorious schedule that athletes have because of games and training, they don’t get the same chance to work outside of the classroom to really take full advantage of the scholarship and obtain a comprehensive education. Joe Nocera, a sports business columnist at The New York Times and co-author of “Indentured: The Inside Story of the Rebellion Against the NCAA,” is outspoken about the reforms he feels are necessary. Nocera left no room for where he stood on the issue, enunciating his clear support for paying student-athletes. In fact, Nocera said he even believes that the term “student-athlete” is incorrect.“(The NCAA) shouldn’t call them student-athletes, but rather athlete-students or employee students, because that’s what they really are,” he said. “Let’s be honest about what the NCAA is. … it’s a cartel.”Former OSU basketball player Kristin Watt (right) speaks at a forum about paying college athletes while former OSU running back Maurice Clarett (left) listens. Credit: Mitch Hooper | Lantern reporterWhen Nocera first began writing about the injustices he believes college athletes face, he said he got emails from readers asking why he was spending his time writing about it. His explanation, delivered passionately on Friday, pierced the crowd.“This is not a sports issue. This is a human rights issue and civil rights issue,” said Nocera, who also brought up the NCAA’s transfer policy, which he denounced. “I came at this through the prism of rights, not pay.” Watt, the former OSU basketball player, was not alone in her opposition to a pay-to-play model. Joining her in dissent was a Marscilla Packer, a fellow former OSU basketball player, Funderburke and Andrew Zimbalist, an economics professor at Smith College in Massachusetts. “I think there are meaningful reforms that can address the economic injustices without going for the pay-for-play model,” said Zimbalist, who cited concerns over growing television revenue and the complicated tax-exempt status donations to athletic departments have. Some of the most common agreed upon reforms that did not involve a direct cash payment included guaranteed scholarships lasting at least four years. Currently, they are for one year, with the option to be renewed. Lifetime health insurance was another proposal that seemed to be agreed upon by all 11 panelists. Nocera said it’s clear that if an athlete sustains injuries while playing sports in college for a university, it’s the school’s duty to make sure the individual has the proper care he or she needs during his or her lifetime. Funderburke, who founded a youth organization after retiring from the NBA, said he has a five-point plan to help student-athletes that does not involve a pay-for-play system. It included mentoring arrangements, life-skills courses for athletes, a deferred-savings stipend and a family emergency fund. “We’re never going to be fair or equitable, but we can at least be sensible,” he said. If there is one thing the panel illustrated, it’s that there is a lot to consider when looking to address injustices in college athletics. Change isn’t going to happen overnight, but having open forums like the panel can prove to be instrumental, said Kelly Trent, a former OSU golfer who is “on the fence” on specifics but agrees collegiate sports are littered with inequity. “For this thing to advance, it’s going to take some giving on both sides,” said Doria, the former executive at ESPN. “And the history of the NCAA in that area hasn’t been good.” read more

See More