Photo library: Tourism and leisure 10

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Tourism & Leisure contact sheet (1.1MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Stellenbosch, Western Cape province: An outdoor restaurant at Blaauwklippen Wine Estate.Photo: Stellenbosch WineRoutes » Download high-res image Stellenbosch, Western Cape province: An outdoor restaurant at Dornier Wine Cellar.Photo: Stellenbosch WineRoutes » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Tourists at the Hector Pieterson Memorial in Soweto, which is named after the 14-year-old boy who was the first killed by police in the June 16 1976 students’ uprising. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Gauteng province: Frontview of the state-of-the-art Maropeng visitors’ centre at the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, which is famous for the wealth of early human fossils found there.Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Gauteng province: Back view of the state-of-the-art Maropeng visitors’ centre at the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, which is famous for the wealth of early human fossils found there. Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image East London, Eastern Cape province: The yacht marina on the seafront. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape province: Sunset over the beachfront sees people running, walking, fishing and cycling to end off the day. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape province: Sunset over the beachfront sees people running, walking, fishing and cycling to end off the day. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape province: Sunset over the beachfront sees people running, walking, fishing and cycling to end off the day. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image TOURISM AND LEISURE 10:{loadposition tourism}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.last_img read more

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Will IoT-driven brand experiences keep the taps flowing?

first_imgInstead of simply quaffing booze, beverage companies want partiers to experience brands, and are using the Internet of Things (IoT) to introduce drinking 2.0.Marketing Week reports that drinks maker Pernod Ricard is increasingly using IoT in its marketing efforts for its products.And while talking to your drink at the bar was previously a warning sign, Pernod Ricard wants to use IoT to let drinkers have an “ongoing conversation” with their tipple of choice.It is doing this by augmenting 40,000 Malibu brand bottles into “digital touchpoints.” The bottles give consumers exclusive content by tapping their smartphone against the bottle. Hopefully gently.“Someone scanning the bottle is not the end of the journey. It brings the product, experience and consumer all together,” said Pernod Ricard UK’s Denis O’Flynn. “We do see [the technology use] becoming broader, where we can incorporate messaging about the product, health guidelines, how to mix and serve it – all that information will be required in future, and will be done through some sort of smart technology.”Digital tech a booming part of media spendingThe company is increasing its media spending in this area, boosting total digital expenditure in 2016 from 31% to 40%.“When it comes to the IoT and [our bottles], clearly we are working on it a lot,” said Pernod Ricard’s managing director of finance and operations Gilles Bogaert. “More and more it will be focused on consumer engagement.”And as beverage-makers get hip to the latest connected technology, they see IoT as a useful technology in boosting consumers brand experience. These being experiences other than getting inebriated.“Potentially it could even help not only to be something passive where consumers can read the scanning but to create an experience for the brand,” said Bogaert.“That’s something we’re looking to do more of in the future. To be able to create more experiences around the brands, including when people are at home organizing parties for instance.”This comes as entertainment and lifestyle companies are increasing turning to connected technology to enhance customer experiences in stadiums and elsewhere. Tags:#branding#Internet of Things#IoT#Malibu#Pernod Ricard Related Posts Follow the Puck Donal Powercenter_img What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces How Myia Health’s Partnership with Mercy Virtua…last_img read more

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Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi head sees self-driving dominance in 5 years

first_imgBreak the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and… Autonomous cars will dominate the streets by 2022, according to Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi Alliance Chairman Carlos Ghosn. The firm, which has an established autonomous car program, wants to give drivers control of their cars; their autonomous cars are not driverless cars — instead, drivers can decide when they want to drive and when they want the car to drive for them.Ghosn says that autonomous cars provide a “huge advantage” for drivers, and as a result, the industry will have “massive growth” in the coming years. Instead of focusing on the road for hours at a time, people can “rest … relax … see a movie” while the car does its work for them.See also: Renault and Powervault partner to power home battery units With autonomous cars featured heavily in news reports — and even spotted in several testing-ground locations in the United States — the hype surrounding autonomous cars begs the question: when will we see autonomous cars on the road?Ghosn believes that most cars will have autonomous technology, as well as some kind of connectivity, by 2022.In much of the developed world, people spend a lot of time in their cars. The United States and Australia feature at the low end of the spectrum, with people averaging about one hour per day in their car, while in parts of Europe and China, people spend an average of two hours per day driving.Self-driving race is onAutonomous cars will free up that time so that people can be more productive; those hours can be used to work on reports or presentations, or even increase the amount of time people can spend with friends and family. This increased leisure time, Ghosn says, will improve people’s quality of life.Competition for the quickest development and launch of autonomous cars is on the rise, especially between technology behemoths Google, Uber and Apple, who have all started and are developing autonomous and driverless car programs. Still, Ghosn says that Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi Alliance is well-poised to dominate the autonomous car market.While Google, Uber and Apple all look to electric cars as the future, Ghosn claims, the Alliance has already dominated the electric car market with the Nissan Leaf, and the Alliance as a whole has sold more than 420,000 electric vehicles around the world.Ghosn believes that the Alliance’s historically successful development of electric cars will give them the upper hand in the race to create the best-selling autonomous car of our time. 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle… For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… Related Posts center_img Tags:#Apple#autonomous vehicles#Google#Internet of Things#IoT#Mitsubishi#Nissan#Renault#Self-Driving#self-driving cars#Uber IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A… Maya Raolast_img read more

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Minister instigated looting: Tripura villagers

first_imgAbout 300 people of West Tripura district, who had fled the area after their homes were torched and looted over the alleged molestation of a girl, said on Saturday that they were scared to return.They alleged that the looting and ransacking of their houses in Lalit Bazaar locality under the Ranir Bazaar police station limit was instigated by Revenue Minister and prominent tribal leader N.C. Debbarma.Mr. Debbarma, president of the Indigenous People’s Front Tripura (IPFT), declined to comment on the charge. Prohibitory orders under Section 144 of the Cr.PC was promulgated in the area for 48 hours from 8 a.m. on Saturday, Sub-divisional Magistrate Subhasish Bandopaddhyaya said.A group of tribal youths started torching and looting houses only after the Minister’s visit on Friday, said the villagers who have taken shelter in a school. “The ransacking and looting of our houses started only after N.C. Debbarma visited the spot. He came here at 9 a.m. and looting of our houses started around an hour later,” 50-year-old Samena Khatun alleged.Scared to returnSulekha Khatun, aged 45, said, “My house was set ablaze, my belongings looted. I do not want to return. Let the police shoot me dead. I will not return.” The conflict began when a girl, along with her boyfriend, had come to Ranir Bazaar area on Thursday from a nearby locality to see Durga idols there and four youths allegedly molested her and snatched her phone. The girl and boy went back to their locality and returned with a large group of people who tried to attack the houses of those who reportedly molested the girl. The four accused were arrested on Friday but the attack on the village continued. A large contingent of police has been deployed in the area.last_img read more

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Hand or foot spasms

first_imgDefinitionSpasms are contractions of the muscles of the hands, thumbs, feet, or toes. Spasms are usually brief, but they can be severe and painful.Alternative NamesFoot spasms; Carpopedal spasm; Spasms of the hands or feet; Hand spasmConsiderationsSymptoms depend on the cause. They may include:CrampingFatigueMuscle weaknessNumbness, tingling, or a “pins and needles” feelingTwitchingUncontrolled, purposeless, rapid motionsNighttime leg cramps are common in the elderly.CausesCramps or spasms in the muscles often have no clear cause.Possible causes of hand or foot spasms include: Abnormal levels of electrolytes or minerals in the body Brain disorders, such as Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, dystonia, and Huntington disease Chronic kidney disease and dialysis Damage to a single nerve or nerve group (mononeuropathy) or multiple nerves (polyneuropathy) that are connected to muscles Dehydration (not having enough fluids in your body)Hyperventilation (overbreathing), which is rapid or deep breathing that can occur with anxiety or panicMuscle cramps, usually caused by overuse during sports or work activityPregnancy, more often during the third trimesterThyroid disordersToo little vitamin DUse of certain medicationsHome CareIf vitamin D deficiency is the cause, supplemental vitamin D should be taken under the doctors direction. Calcium supplements may also help.Being active helps keep muscles loose. Aerobic exercise, especially swimming, and strength building exercises are helpful. But care must be taken not to overdo activity, which can worsen the spasms.Drinking plenty of fluids during exercise is also important.When to Contact a Medical ProfessionalIf you notice recurrent spasms of your hands or feet, call your health care provider.advertisementWhat to Expect at Your Office VisitThe doctor or nurse will perform a physical exam and ask about your medical history and symptoms.Blood and urine tests may be done. Tests may include:Potassium, calcium and magnesium levelsHormone levelsKidney function testsVitamin D levels (25-OH vitamin D)Treatment depends on the cause of the spasms. For example, if they are due to a low level of vitamin D in your body, your doctor will likely recommend that you take a vitamin D supplement.ReferencesStein J. Spasticity. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2008:chap 144.Review Date:2/24/2014Reviewed By:Joseph V. Campellone, M.D., Division of Neurology, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.last_img read more

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