Food handlers’ gloves may not mean cleaner food

first_img They also say that food managers and workers prefer to use gloves because glove use is easier to monitor than handwashing is. However, “It has often been found that glove use provides a false sense of security because food handlers misuse gloves or neglect washing their hands when gloves are worn,” the article concludes. Overall, testing showed coliform bacteria on 6.5% (24 of 359) of samples for which data were complete. The coliform rate for samples prepared with gloved hands was 9.6%, versus 4.4% for samples handled without gloves. Though the sample was too small to show a significant difference, each of the two rates fell outside the other’s 95% confidence interval, which suggests that a true difference is not unlikely, the report says. Gloves were used on 93% of 172 samples collected in Kansas, where gloves are required by state law, but on only 5% of 191 samples collected in Oklahoma, where they are not, the report says. “Overall, the results of this study suggest that use of gloves by food handlers does not reduce bacterial contamination of foods and might even increase the risk of microbial contamination,” says the report by Robert A. Lynch and colleagues at the University of Oklahoma Department of Occupational and Environmental Health in Oklahoma City. Testing of flour tortillas bought at about 140 fast-food restaurants in Tulsa, Okla., and Wichita, Kan., showed that those handled by gloved workers were more than twice as likely to have coliform bacteria on them as were those handled by gloveless workers, the report says. However, the number of samples was not large enough to make the difference statistically significant. A finding of coliform bacteria (a general term for intestinal microbes) indicates that pathogenic bacteria could be present. The authors write that the higher coliform bacteria rate associated with gloves suggests that food workers were not using gloves properly. “We observed several instances in which previously used gloves were reused, and we never observed glove wearers changing gloves in the midst of food preparation,” they state. “Given the levels of surface bacteria that have been reported in food service settings, it is not surprising that organisms were transferred to the food that were tested.”center_img The researchers found low rates of contamination when they tested for particular bacterial species: 0.3% (1 of 371 samples) for Escherichia coli, 2.2% (8 of 371) for Staphylococcus aureus, and 0.5% (2 of 371) for Klebsiella species. The investigators did not actually count bacterial organisms, however. No potentially pathogenic microbes were found on the unopened tortilla samples. Lynch RA, Phillips ML, Elledge BL, et al. A preliminary evaluation of the effect of glove use by food handlers in fast food restaurants. J Food Prot 2005;68(1):187-90 [Abstract] The researchers collected 371 flour tortillas at restaurants from four fast-food chains in the two cities and tested them for bacteria. When ordering the food, the investigators observed whether or not the workers wore gloves, among other details. The researchers also collected 82 unopened packages of tortillas from the four chains and tested them to assess the background level of bacteria present before handling. Feb 7, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – The use of gloves by fast-food restaurant workers might be expected to result in cleaner food, but that isn’t necessarily the case, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Food Protection.last_img read more

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Pennsylvania Moves Forward with Governor Wolf’s Plan to Control Methane and Other Air Pollution

first_imgPennsylvania Moves Forward with Governor Wolf’s Plan to Control Methane and Other Air Pollution Environment,  Press Release Pennsylvania took a step forward to reduce air pollution, including methane, from natural gas wells and pipelines with the approval of changes to the state’s air quality regulations. Guided by Governor Tom Wolf’s Methane Reduction Strategy, today’s action marks another step in the commonwealth’s efforts to address global greenhouse gas emissions and the impacts of climate change.“Pennsylvania has seen major reductions in pollution since I came to office and our focus on increased reliance on clean energy, improved energy efficiency, and improved oversight of emissions of potent greenhouse gasses such as methane, have all been critical in helping to move Pennsylvania forward,” said Governor Wolf. “I am proud to announce that we’ve taken another step in implementing my Methane Reduction Strategy. The new regulations will help identify and prevent leaks from existing wells and infrastructure, while protecting the environment, reducing climate change, and helping businesses reduce the waste of a valuable product.”The Pennsylvania Environmental Quality Board (EQB), an independent board responsible for adopting environmental regulations, approved revisions to air quality regulations for existing oil and natural gas wells and pipelines. These regulations will reduce emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from well sites, pipelines, and other infrastructure.A part of the governor’s Methane Reduction Strategy, the updated emissions controls for VOCs will also reduce methane emissions, as the same control practices that prevent VOCs from escaping from natural gas infrastructure also prevent methane from escaping as well. The new regulations are expected to reduce VOC emissions by more than 4,400 tons per year, and methane emissions by more than 75,000 tons per year.“Both methane and VOC are precursors to the formation of ground-level ozone, a public health and hazard that contributes to asthma and other lung diseases such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis,” said Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “In addition to addressing climate change, the regulation will improve air quality across the state, ensuring that all Pennsylvanians, including particularly young and at-risk residents, are protected from harmful air pollutants.”The new regulations would require oil and gas operators that produce above a certain threshold to use leak detection and repair (LDAR) equipment to identify (and fix) leaks, as well as use other equipment designed to reduce emissions.Methane is a greenhouse gas more potent than carbon dioxide and reducing methane emissions is critical to addressing climate change. The Wolf administration has taken several steps to combat climate change and protect Pennsylvania from climate disasters, including joining the U.S. Climate Alliance and directing DEP to draft regulations to take part in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative to reduce carbon pollution from power plants.A public comment period on the proposed regulations will open in 2020. After comments are considered, DEP will draft the final regulation for consideration by the EQB. The comment period will be published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin, and comments will be accepted through DEP’s eComment system. December 17, 2019center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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CJIA deputy CEO sent on leave, released on station bail

first_imgThe Deputy Chief Executive Officer (DCEO) of the Cheddi Jagan International Airport Corporation (CJIAC) has been sent on one week leave following the allegation of sexual assault by a concessionaire staff of a duty free shop at the airport.It was alleged that this sexual assault incident occurred in the office of the DCEO on July 30, 2018, while the duty free staff was in a meeting with him.The victim claimed that she was inappropriately hugged and kissed on her lips by the accused. In her complaint letter the day after the incident, which was seen by this newspaper, the woman explained that she went to the DCEO to have an issue with her boss’ vehicle resolved.After a commitment was given to have security remove the clamp on the vehicle, the woman said she got up to leave and the senior official did the same, but walked around his desk to hug her. She recounted that the act was “inappropriate”. She pulled away but the man allegedly kissed her on the lips.The victim said she immediately turned and headed for the door, but was intercepted by the by the senior official, who placed his hand on the door to keep it shut and then allegedly kissed her again, for a longer time.According to the woman, she left afterward in shock and was so upset about the incident that she vomited all day.The woman had reported the matter to the airport’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and the Human Resources Manager and she was assured that the matter would be investigated.However, months have passed and she had not heard anything; after enquiring recently, she received a WhatsApp message stating that the issue was “addressed” but with no details about any actions being taken.When further questions posed to the airport heads went unanswered, the woman reported the matter at the Timehri Police Station. The incident was subsequently reported in the mediaAs a result, the airport pass of the concessionaire staff was revoked last week.In a subsequent statement earlier this week, the CJIAC confirmed that a senior official was being investigated for sexual misconduct and was sent on administrative leave on Tuesday pending the outcome of a new investigation into the complaint.A police source confirmed that the official has been placed on $20,000 station bail as they continue to investigate the matter.Meanwhile, efforts to contact the Chief Executive Officer and the Human Resources Manager for a comment on the matter proved futile.last_img read more

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