Tony Romo: 49ers, Raiders could be really good — or not

first_imgSTATELINE, Nev. – Tony Romo, known for remarkable prescience as CBS’ lead NFL analyst, is baffled at what to expect from the 49ers and Raiders this season.“Both of those teams, they could be really good, or, the league is very tough, from week to week, game to game,” Romo said at the American Century Championship celebrity golf tournament, where he’ll defend his championship this weekend.Tony Romo chips on to the 12th hole green at Monterey Peninsula Country Club Shore Course during the …last_img

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Farmers Table event in NE Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Fresh, local, summer ingredients from northeast Ohio will be the inspiration for a unique farm to table culinary experience this August that celebrates Ohio farms and flavors.The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA) is partnering with Maplestar Farm and The Driftwood Group for The Farmers’ Table on Sunday, August 30 at 4 p.m. The event will take place in western Geauga County at Maplestar Farm in Auburn Township.Guests will take a guided tour of Maplestar Farm’s organic fields, sample carefully crafted hors d’oeuvres, and enjoy beer, wine, and tea before sitting down to an exciting four course meal prepared by Erik Martinez, Executive Chef at Cibréo Italian Kitchen, featuring wine pairings.The event will also feature special guest Alan Guebert, award-winning syndicated agricultural journalist and OEFFA 2015 conference keynote speaker, who will offer a hearty toast to local food. Following the dinner, he’ll be signing his new book, The Land of Milk and Uncle Honey, and sharing stories. The book was recently included on Bon Appetit Magazine‘s 20 Food Books to Read This Summer, LA Magazine‘s Top 10 Summer Books for Foodies, and Food Tank’s Summer Reading List.Tickets are $125 per person or $1,000 for a table of 8. All proceeds support OEFFA’s work to grow Ohio’s sustainable and organic agriculture movement.For more information or to purchase tickets, go to www.oeffa.org/FarmersTable, call (614) 421-Ext. 206, or email dinner@oeffa.org.last_img read more

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Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Episode 26 | From the Farm Science Review!

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The crew of host Joel Penhorwood, Ty Higgins, Dale Minyo, and Matt Reese bring this week’s podcast from the 2017 Farm Science Review (recorded on Monday before FSR got underway, September 19-21).The Farm Science Review always one of Ohio agriculture’s biggest events from year to year. For visitors to the 2017 Review, Ty talked with Matt Sullivan, general manager of the Molly Caren Agricultural Center, about this year’s FSR and what to know.The Review is known as a key time to check out the latest innovations in agriculture, especially from the equipment side. In that spirit, Joel visited with Scott Brown, territory manager with Geringhoff, about the Truflex Razor draper combine header — just one of the amazing pieces of equipment in action during the field demonstrations.And while agriculturalists from all around are visiting the FSR outside of London, Ohio, the event also serves as a good time to show non-agricultural folks the modern world of farming. Matt’s talk with Lance Westcamp, mayor of Groverport and farmer himself, highlights that need to communicate agriculture to newer generations becoming further disengaged with how food and fiber are produced.All that and more, including the crew celebrating Ty’s 40th birthday, on the 26th episode of the Ohio Ag Net Podcast, courtesy of AgriGold. More at agrigold.com.last_img read more

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India vs Sri Lanka World Cup final: It’s Sachin versus Murali on the D-Day

first_imgThey were the hot favourites and they have made it to the summit – Yes, it’s India vs Sri Lanka World Cup final. And Sachin Tendulkar on his home ground, bidding for a first title in six trips to the World Cup, will take on Muttiah Muralitharan, aiming to win it again in his last game for Sri Lanka. PhotosAnother contest on the cards is Lasith Malinga vs Virender Sehwag. Both are experts in their art. Tendulkar will be under enormous pressure, with India desperate to end a 28-year wait for its second World Cup title and become the first country to win it on home soil. Tendulkar, who will be 38 next month and is showing no signs of being slowed by age, made his first-class debut at Wankhede Stadium – venue for the final – in 1998 and has been in the international arena for two decades.He has scored more runs than any batsman ever – more than 18,000 in ODIs alone – and is one shy of his 100th hundred in international cricket. His nearest rival, recently deposed Australian captain Ricky Ponting, is next on the list with 69.Tendulkar narrowly missed his century of centuries in India’s 29-run semi-final win over archrival Pakistan, but he was dropped four times and had an lbw decision overturned. Such a streaky innings wouldn’t have done the most elegant of batsmen justice.Besides, it adds even more drama to the tournament final in the thriving financial and entertainment hub, home to India’s Bollywood.advertisement”Going back to Mumbai, especially for this event, is a wonderful occasion,” Tendulkar said. “And all I want to say is, we want to be calm, focus on our job and get the job done.”Muralitharan, hobbling and doubtful with a host of nagging injuries, won the World Cup at the age of 23 when Sri Lanka stunned the cricket establishment by winning the premier limited-overs title with a seven-wicket over the Australians at Lahore in 1996.Since then, he has taken more wickets in tests and limited-overs cricket than anyone in history. And he only needs three more to equal Australian pace great Glenn McGrath’s record 71 World Cup wickets.He had his perfect Colombo send off when he took a wicket with his final ball on home soil in Sri Lanka’s semifinal win over New Zealand, when he was hoisted onto his teammates’ shoulders and later did a lap of honor with the national flag.Muralitharan has been through many trials and tribulations, not least when he was no-balled for using what umpires considered an illegal bowling action on his first tour to Australia, so he’s unlikely to let hamstring, groin and side strains stop him rolling in for his last 10 overs of off spin.”Chances are good that Murali will play,” Sri Lanka’s Australian-born coach Trevor Bayliss said Thursday. “He completed 10 overs in the semifinal, and such is the character of the man that he will play even with discomfort.” Sri Lanka’s other injury concern is allrounder Angelo Mathews, who left the field late in the semifinal with a muscle strain.Just in case, though, Sri Lanka is sending veteran seamer Chaminda Vaas and off-spinner Suraj Randiv to Mumbai on standby.The only other concern for Sri Lanka is a lack of time at the crease for its middle order. The Sri Lankans have three of the top five scorers in the tournament, led by opener Tillakaratne Dilshan. Skipper Kumar Sangakkara is also in superb touch at No. 3 and as wicketkeeper.India’s batting is undoubtedly its strength, but the bowling attack did well to defend 260 at Mohali, with all five bowlers taking two wickets apiece.This is the first all-Asian final, and probably the hardest to pick because the combinations match up well.One thing in India’s favor has been its tougher run to the final, following the must-win group match against the West Indies with a big quarterfinal win over three-time defending champion Australia and then ousting Pakistan in a blockbuster semifinal. If India wins on Saturday, it will have beaten every former World Cup champion to capture the title.”It’s important to peak at the right time,” skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni said after the victory over Pakistan. “Throughout the tournament we didn’t have any easy games. Every game we had, we had to struggle. All in all, we’re ready for the finals.”In Sri Lanka’s favor is its World Cup record against India, with four wins from their six completed matches.In India, Sri Lanka is two from two, after winning both the group match and the semifinal final here in 1996, the latter finishing in sensational circumstances.advertisementThe Sri Lankans were awarded the match at Calcutta by default after the 100,000 strong crowd rioted when it became obvious that India would struggle to win. Chasing 252, India was 120 for eight in the 35th over when ICC match referee Clive Lloyd took the teams off the field and then decided to abandon the match when there was more crowd trouble.There’s unlikely to be any repeat of that disturbance, with strict security in place and Wankhede reduced to just over 30,000 in a recently completed refurbishment.With AP inputslast_img read more

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