Weeden Stats Update

first_img Photo Attribution: KT KingBefore the season started I made some predictions about how the Cowboys would fare this year, and specifically how prolific Brandon Weeden would perform in his senior campaign.I looked like a fool coming out of the gate after he looked average against Louisiana but everything came together last weekend in College Station for, surely, the most spectacular half of quarterbacking OSU has ever had.Let’s take a look at where we are with some of those predictions I made as well as a few other Weeden superlatives through four games.I said Brandon Weeden…Would throw more TDs than he did last year (34) – On pace for 32.5, easily within reach.Would break the completion percentage record he set last year of .669 – Currently at an absurd 74.3%Would be in New York City on December 10 – I’m going to be the conductor of this train until it happens or we careen off the tracks.Would become OSU’s all-time leading passer – Needs to average 243 the rest of the way. I’m pretty confident that’s going to happen.Would set the career TDs thrown record this year – Needs 18 more to tie Zac. That’s definitely hanging in the balance, but I say he gets it. Hell, he might throw for 7 or 8 against KU and Baylor.Weeden currently has more passing yards than 71 other teams have total yards.He leads the nation in attempts per game (48) and is on pace to throw 621 times this year which would break the school record he set last year by 110 throws. BJ Symons says, “so?”He leads the nation in completions per game (36) and is on pace to complete 462 passes which would break his school record by 120 completions.Only eleven other QBs have completed more passes in an entire year than Weeden has through four games.On Sunday Pat Jones said this about Weeden:This guy might be Barry Sanders playing quarterback.Pat is confused and sounds like he’s just trying to spew hyperbole because to compare someone, statistically or otherwise, to Barry Sanders is not a good basis for any argument.The point remains though, that the aged gunslinger from Edmond is conjuring up historical comparisons the likes of which we’ve never seen come through Stillwater. I hope you’re enjoying the ride.This post is part of a season-long series on the Heisman hopes of Brandon Weeden and Justin Blackmon. Click here to read more.If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

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Kentucky’s Willie Cauley-Stein On Arkansas, “We Don’t Like That Team”

first_imgWillie Cauley Stein warms up for Kentucky.Prior to Sunday’s SEC Tournament championship game, Arkansas’ players did some trash talking to their opponent, Kentucky. They reportedly got in the Wildcats’ faces in a Bridgestone Arena tunnel and Razorbacks’ forward Bobby Portis said being able to play UK was like getting a wish granted. The fervor Arkansas’ players have for Kentucky is a feeling that is apparently replicated by the Wildcats’ players. Following his team’s victory against the Razorbacks, Kentucky junior center Willie Cauley-Stein said “we don’t like that team,” referencing Arkansas. Wow. Willie keeping it REAL. “We don’t like that team.” Said winning title was one thing, but they just wanted to beat “that team.”— Ashley Scoby (@AshleyScoby) March 15, 2015Willie Cauley-Stein after the game re: Arkansas, “Straight up, we don’t like that team.”— Brett Dawson (@BDawsonRivals) March 15, 2015Full WCS quote on not liking “that team” pic.twitter.com/EoGtkE2VTJ— Ashley Scoby (@AshleyScoby) March 15, 2015It’s not often that you see college basketball players openly discussing their dislike for another team, but we love it. Kentucky and Arkansas will learn their place in the NCAA Tournament at 6 p.m. E.T. on CBS.last_img read more

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PHOTOS: Labour Department and You Roadshow

first_imgMinister of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Shahine Robinson (right), speaks with Country Coordinator of Winrock International, Cheryl Davis Ivey, at the launch of the ‘Labour Department and You’ Road Show, which was held at the Rudolph Elder Park in Morant Bay, St. Thomas, on Tuesday (February 26). The initiative is aimed at bringing the services of the department to citizens across the island, as well as to heighten awareness about its programmes and policies. Minister of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Shahine Robinson, addresses the launch of the ‘Labour Department and You’ Road Show, which was held at the Rudolph Elder Park in Morant Bay, St. Thomas, on Tuesday (February 26). The initiative is aimed at bringing the services of the department to citizens across the island, as well as to heighten awareness about its programmes and policies.last_img read more

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Wonder Woman Breaks Glass Ceiling For Female Directors With 97M Debut Earns

first_imgAdvertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Login/Register With:center_img Advertisement Twitter After weathering lackluster critical scores and OK fan response with last year’s Batman V. Superman: Dawn Of Justice and Suicide Squad, all is well and correct in the Warner Bros/DC universe as Wonder Woman is both a hit with critics (94% Certified Fresh Rotten Tomatoes) and audiences, earning an A CinemaScore on top of her current $97.1 million opening.Out of all the titles in the WB/DC canon, Wonder Woman owns one of five rare A grades along with Batman, Batman Begins, The Dark Knight and The Dark Knight Rises. Today will determine whether Wonder Woman propels past $100M, and a few believe it’s not out of the question.Four weeks ago, Wonder Woman arrived on tracking at $65M and just grew from there — to $75M three weeks out, and $90M a few days before its opening. Not only is that evidence of Warner Bros’ marketing machine working effectively, but it’s also an example of what happens when Rotten Tomatoes works in a tentpole’s favor, especially as there’s a groundswell of great reviews days before a film opens.last_img read more

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Elder concerned about harassment allegations at Edmonton prison

first_imgTamara Pimemtel APTN NewsTwo correctional officers and two managers were fired recently at the maximum security prison in Edmonton.There were allegations of harassment, intimidation, bullying and there may be possible criminal offences.Keith Chief Moon worked in correctional facilities across Alberta for over 30 years.He’s an elder and brings in cultural practices.He is concerned, but not surprised, about the allegations.tpimentel@aptn.calast_img

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New hope for treating devastating brain cancer in children

first_img Source:https://www.rockefeller.edu/news/25535-new-hope-treating-childhood-brain-cancer/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 5 2019There could be new treatments on the horizon for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, or DIPG, a devastating form of brain cancer that afflicts young children and is currently incurable. Recent experiments in animal models of the disease have identified an experimental drug that effectively destroys DIPG cells. And a team of Rockefeller scientists just figured out how this promising compound works.The research, described in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that the drug acts on cellular cholesterol pathways, and suggests that these pathways may be fruitful targets for treating a variety of brain cancers.Targeting tumorsDIPG tumors are located in the pons, a highly sensitive structure that connects the brain to the spinal cord. Surgical removal of tumors is effectively impossible since it poses the risk of fatal brain damage. And although radiation can be used to temporarily reduce symptoms, the cancer inevitably grows, with an average survival rate of less than one year. Which is to say: there is a pressing need for new ways to treat children with the disease.An auspicious development came in 2014 from a collaboration between the labs of C. David Allis, the Joy and Jack Fishman Professor, and Viviane Tabar, Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). The team showed that a compound known as MI-2 stops tumor growth in a mouse model of DIPG. The drug was already on scientists’ radar for the treatment of leukemia, and was known to work on leukemia cells by interacting with menin, a protein that regulates gene expression. So when Allis’ team began investigating the effect of MI-2 on DIPG cells, they initially suspected that it would work in a similar manner.”Our first hypothesis was that the drug switched off genes by interacting with menin,” says Richard Phillips, a neuro-oncologist at MSKCC and a visiting fellow in the Allis lab who spearheaded this effort. “But as we probed a little bit further, many of the things that we would expect to see didn’t pan out.”Related StoriesResearchers report how a popular antidepressant drug could rewire the brainHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerFor example, when the researchers genetically removed menin from glioma cells, those cells remained sensitive to MI-2, indicating that the compound exerted its effects via a pathway distinct from that observed in leukemia. The scientists then discovered that DIPG cells exposed to MI-2 failed to maintain healthy levels of cholesterol, and quickly died; but the cells could be rescued with a dose of supplemental cholesterol–suggesting that, in the case of glioma, MI-2 works by depleting the nutrient. Eventually, the researchers discovered that MI-2 directly inhibits lanosterol synthase, an enzyme involved in cholesterol production.The researchers also found that, while MI-2 destroys glioma cells, the drug doesn’t damage normal brain cells. This finding is consistent with other research showing that some cancer cells are particularly vulnerable to cholesterol disturbances.Building better drugsThis study contributes to a growing body of research pointing to cholesterol interference as a promising new way to treat cancer. Moving forward, Phillips and his colleagues hope to develop compounds that are optimized for targeting brain cancer. As a starting point, they are studying a number of cholesterol-reducing compounds that are already on the market.”Some existing drugs, initially made for people with high cholesterol, were designed to target lanosterol synthase–but they were never really thought of as cancer drugs,” he says. “One of them is even more potent than MI-2, so we’re now working with a team of chemical biologists to see if we can modify the drug so that it reaches the brain.”More broadly, this research highlights the importance of knowing not just that a drug works, but how it works. In this case, the discovery that MI-2 acts on lanosterol synthase revealed that DIPG tumors are sensitive to cholesterol interference–a finding that opens avenues for the production of even more effective compounds.Says Phillips: “You can’t assume that what it says on the label is actually how a drug works.”last_img read more

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Researchers use brain scans to provide better understanding of unconscious bias

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 24 2019Unconscious bias has become a hot topic recently, with high profile incidents reported around the world. Researchers at Aalto University are exploring the causes of these biases in our neural wiring, and are developing techniques using MRI scanners that let us see the brain making assumptions in real time. The results show for the first time that the brain is not only unconsciously biased towards people based on appearance, but it also forms biases based on what we know about the person as well.Peoples’ brains are naturally biased towards other people who are the same as them – a behavioral trait scientists call ‘in-group favoritism’. The opposite trait is also true: people are often naturally biased against people who are not the same as them, called ‘out-group derogation’. Mamdooh Afdile – a filmmaker studying for a PhD in neuroscience at Aalto University – decided to use cinema to explore this.Afdile used the film Priest to create a 20-minute stimulus film version that explored biases in two social groupings: heterosexual and homosexual men. ‘If knowledge gained from our social environment can implicitly bias how we perceive each other, this should hold true to characters in movies as well,’ Afdile explained. To see if watching the movie biased the viewers subconsciously, Afdile flashed the face of the protagonist repeatedly for a brief duration of 40 milliseconds before and after showing the movie.Even though the viewer wouldn’t be able to notice being shown a person’s face – much less have time to recognize the person – their subconscious brain responded to the flashed face based on whether or not they had become biased. By using functional MRI, the researchers were able to detect how people’s biases could be changed.Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustRush University Medical Center offers new FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysmsIn the beginning of the movie, the viewer gets the impression that the priest is heterosexual and falling in love with a woman. At the 10 minute mark, the viewer finds out the priest is in fact in love with another man. The study groups watching the film consisted of 14 homosexual and 15 heterosexual men, and the team measured the bias felt by each group towards the priest character when they thought he was straight, and when they knew he was gay.The social groupings were chosen by the researchers because, unlike race or gender, we cannot perceive another person’s sexual orientation just by looking at their face – so any bias response by the participants in the experiment toward the face presented to them would be dependent on what they came to know about the person. The subconscious response to the face of the protagonist after seeing the movie, compared to before seeing it, was significantly different between the two groups, and this result was not symmetrical. The results from the heterosexual group showed a very mild negative bias response, and interestingly those from the homosexual group showed a very strong response in brain regions associated with in-group, such as empathy and favoritism.These results are interesting for our understanding of unconscious bias because they demonstrate that the brain responds in a biased way to traits it can’t detect using our basic senses.’This study shows the brain can be biased based on learned knowledge and not only by external factors,’ explains. Mamdooh Afdile. By combining movies with subliminal measurement we can now investigate the subconscious brain in ways that were extremely difficult before.’ Source:https://www.aalto.fi/news/brain-scans-on-movie-watchers-reveal-how-we-judge-peoplelast_img read more

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Volkswagen sees good start to 2018 despite slip in profits

© 2018 AFP Citation: Volkswagen sees ‘good start’ to 2018 despite slip in profits (2018, April 26) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-volkswagen-good-profits.html German car giant Volkswagen on Thursday reported a small drop in profits but nonetheless said strong sales got the year off to “a good start”, as new CEO Herbert Diess pushes on with a post-dieselgate revamp of the behemoth. Volkswagen makes 15-bn-euro bet on electric cars in China Explore further Volkswagen CEO Herbert Diess has vowed to steer the company out of the Dieselgate cloud and continue its pivot towards the greener, cleaner cars of the future VW said it booked a net profit of 3.22 billion euros ($3.9 billion) between January and March, down nearly three percent on the same period a year earlier and slightly below analyst expectations.Underlying or operating profit slipped by 3.6 percent to 4.2 billion euros, the firm said, blaming the drop mainly on accounting changes and negative currency effects.Revenues hit 58.2 billion euros, up 3.6 percent year-on-year, as the VW group with its stable of 12 brands delivered a record 2.7 million vehicles in the first quarter.In a statement, the Wolfsburg-based company said the year was “off to a good start”.Demand for VW vehicles—which also includes luxury Audi and Porsche and the more affordable Skoda and Seat makes—was driven by the Asia-Pacific region, led by China’s strong appetite for SUVs.”Once again, the growth driver was the Chinese passenger car market,” VW said.The picture in western Europe was more mixed, with sales slowing in Italy and Britain, while dealerships in Germany were boosted by the robust economy and the popularity of a trade-in scheme for older diesel engines.The first-quarter results are the first to be announced since VW brand chief Diess unexpectedly replaced Matthias Mueller as chief executive earlier this month, as the group seeks to draw a line under the diesel emissions rigging scandal.Mueller was himself brought in to rescue VW after the company admitted in 2015 to installing cheating software in 11 million diesel vehicles worldwide to dupe pollution tests.While Mueller managed to bring VW’s share price and profits back up to pre-crisis levels, he himself landed in prosecutors’ sights and the company remains mired in a sea of legal woes at home and abroad.Diess has vowed to steer the car titan out of the dieselgate cloud and continue VW’s pivot towards the greener, cleaner cars of the future.Much of the focus will be on China, where VW this week pledged investments of 15 billion euros in electric and autonomous vehicles by 2022, in cooperation with local joint-venture partners.”The quarterly results confirm we are on the right path,” Diess said. “It is now a matter of pursuing this course in a strong and focused manner.”Looking ahead, the group confirmed that it expects to increase revenue by “as much as 5.0 percent” compared with the previous year.It will also target an operating profit margin before special items of between 6.5 and 7.5 percent, compared with 7.4 percent last year.The group said the main challenges this year were likely to come from economic headwinds, stronger competition and the continued fallout from the diesel scandal, including tough new EU emissions rules. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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Fukushima current state of the cleanup

first_img Some workers have called for increased surveillance Explore further Eight years on, the disaster zone remains a huge building site with the immediate danger cleared but an immensely difficult clean-up job still looming.What is the state of the clean-up?The clean-up operation is progressing at a painstakingly slow pace.Robotic arms have recently been employed to successfully pick up pebble-sized pieces of radioactive fuel at the bottom of reactor two, one of three that melted down after the 2011 quake and tsunami.This is the first step to prepare the extremely delicate task of extracting the fuel that will not begin in earnest until 2021 at the earliest, the government and the TEPCO operator have said.Another problem is the fuel pools in reactors one, two and three.The pool in reactor one is covered in rubble which needs to be removed “with extreme care,” explained Akira Ono, head of the TEPCO subsidiary in charge of decommissioning.Removing fuel from the pools in reactors one and two will not start until 2023.As for reactor three, the operation to remove fuel should have started this month but it was delayed “due to various problems”, admitted Ono. What about contaminated water?Contaminated water still poses a huge problem for Fukushima operators. The water comes in three forms: residual water from the tsunami; water used to cool the reactors, and precipitation as well as groundwater. All water needs to be pumped, purified and stored.An ice wall stretching 1.5 kilometres and located 30 metres underground is designed to block underground water from nearby mountains from flowing into the shattered complex.The operators are winning the battle against contaminated water, Ono insisted, but non-profits like Greenpeace disagree.”It has gone down to 220 cubic metres on average per day in 2017/18 compared to 470 cubic metres four years ago,” he said.”We think we can get it down to 150 cubic metres by 2020.”However, inevitable typhoons and other periods of heavy rain make it an uphill battle. The clean-up continues Citation: Fukushima: current state of the clean-up (2019, March 8) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-fukushima-current-state-clean-up.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2019 AFP Shaun Burbie from Greenpeace said: “The government and TEPCO had set a target of 2020 as a timeframe for solving the water crisis…. That was never credible.”The reprocessing of all contaminated water will take five to six years, he estimated, and there are “remaining questions over its efficacy.””Volumes of contaminated water will continue to increase in the coming years.” The work is painstaking and likely to take several more years Eight years have passed since a tsunami smashed into the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan, sparking a meltdown and the worst atomic crisis since Chernobyl. Robot probes radioactive fuel at Japan’s Fukushima plant How is water decontaminated?Around 1.12 million cubic metres are stored onsite but the maximum of 1.37 million cubic metres will be reached at the end of 2020.The water is purified by a decontamination system that eliminates all radioactive elements with the exception of tritium.However, TEPCO realised last year that 85 percent of the water still contained too much potentially radioactive material and so decided to filter it a second time.Experts are still trying to work out what to do with this tritium-contaminated water.”There are several possible solutions (injecting it into deep pockets in the Earth, dumping it at sea, evaporating it) being examined by an expert working group but we have not yet decided anything,” said Yumiko Hata, head of Fukushima waste management at the industry ministry.As for solid radioactive waste, TEPCO plans to store 750,000 cubic metres of waste at the site until 2029—some of which is radioactive. What about the workers?The number of people working on the site has nearly halved from four years ago but there are still some 5,000 labourers.”A lot of the big jobs have been done (ice wall, protective coating on the ground, construction of various buildings),” said Ono.Workers are exposed to average levels of radiation below 5 millisieverts per year but TEPCO admits that this average masks a wide difference in individual levels depending on what jobs the workers carry out.One former worker, Minoru Ikeda, said surveillance should be strengthened.”We have a radiation book but only my employer looked at this. We are not especially monitored by the government and that’s not normal,” he complained.last_img read more

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Ethiopian airline defends its pilots training standards

first_imgIn this March 21, 2018, file photo a Thai Lion Air employee displays a ceremonial key to the company’s newest plane, Boeing’s first 737 MAX 9 jet, following a delivery ceremony to the airline in Seattle. The United States and many other countries have grounded the Max 8s and larger Max 9s as Boeing faces the challenge of proving the jets are safe to fly amid suspicions that faulty sensors and software contributed to the two crashes in less than five months. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) “If we are left alone, clearly we can’t move,” said Merciline Ndegwa, one of the relatives seeking compensation. “It’s been a difficult time reaching out to the airline and even Ethiopia’s government. So, as we move forward, it is our wish to have help from the government in that front.”Another, Erick Mwangi, spoke of what could be an “expensive and tedious” legal battle.Macharia Kamau, principal secretary of Kenya’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, advised the families to “come together as a group” as the country’s attorney general takes up the matter.The government will assist in obtaining death certificates for the victims, he said. CEO Tewolde Gebremariam said that the airline’s pilots completed the training meant to help them shift from an older model to the newer 737 Max 8.He said in a statement the pilots were also made aware of an emergency directive issued by the U.S. regulator, the FAA, following the crash of a Boeing 737 Max 8 owned by Indonesia’s Lion Air in October.As investigators look into the crashes, attention has turned to a new software in the jets that can push their nose down in some circumstances, for example when the sensors suggest the plane may be stalling.The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has said satellite-based tracking data showed that the movements of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 were similar to those of Lion Air Flight 610, which killed 189 people.The New York Times reported that the pilots of the Ethiopian plane never trained in a simulator for the plane. Gebremariam said that the 737 Max simulator is not designed to simulate problems in the new jet software. He declined, however, to say whether the pilots had trained on the simulator. Ethiopian Airlines said Thursday that its pilots went through all the extra training required by Boeing and the U.S. aviation regulators to fly the 737 Max 8 jet that crashed this month, killing all 157 people on board. Officials have delivered bags of scorched earth from the crash site to family members of the victims because of the problems with identifying the remains.Thirty-two Kenyans were among the 157 victims of the plane crash. No nation lost more. Citation: Ethiopian airline defends its pilots’ training standards (2019, March 21) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-ethiopian-airline-defends-standards.html Paris investigators start studying Ethiopian jet’s recorder The Ethiopian Airlines jetliner, on a regularly scheduled flight from Ethiopia to neighboring Kenya, carried people from 35 countries when it crashed on March 10 shortly after takeoff from the capital Addis Ababa.The Boeing Max planes have since been grounded around the world as authorities try to identify the problem and Boeing issues an update to its aviation software.Meanwhile, the families of Kenyan victims of the Ethiopian plane crash are asking their government for legal assistance in pursuing compensation.In an emotional gathering Thursday in the Kenyan capital of Nairobi, the victims’ relatives asked for lawyers to help them pursue their case.center_img In this March 14, 2019, file photo a worker walks next to a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane parked at Boeing Field in Seattle. U.S. prosecutors are looking into the development of Boeing’s 737 Max jets, a person briefed on the matter revealed Monday, the same day French aviation investigators concluded there were “clear similarities” in the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Max 8 last week and a Lion Air jet in October. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File) Explore further In this Monday, March 11, 2019 file photo, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for TUI Group sits parked in the background at right at Boeing Co.’s Renton Assembly Plant in Renton, Wash. The Transportation Department confirmed that its watchdog agency will examine how the FAA certified the Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, the now-grounded plane involved in two fatal accidents within five months. The FAA had stood by the safety of the plane up until last Wednesday, March 13, 2019 despite other countries grounding it. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File) © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. In this March 13, 2019, file photo people work in the flight deck of a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for TUI Group parked next to another MAX 8 also designated for TUI at Boeing Co.’s Renton Assembly Plant in Renton, Wash. U.S. prosecutors are looking into the development of Boeing’s 737 Max jets, a person briefed on the matter revealed Monday, the same day French aviation investigators concluded there were “clear similarities” in the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Max 8 last week and a Lion Air jet in October. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Artificial intelligenceenhanced journalism offers a glimpse of the future of the knowledge

first_img A common question as these intelligent technologies infiltrate various industries is how work and labor will be affected. In this case, who—or what—will do journalism in this AI-enhanced and automated world, and how will they do it?The evidence I’ve assembled in my new book “Automating the New: How Algorithms are Rewriting the Media” suggests that the future of AI-enabled journalism will still have plenty of people around. However, the jobs, roles and tasks of those people will evolve and look a bit different. Human work will be hybridized—blended together with algorithms—to suit AI’s capabilities and accommodate its limitations.Augmenting, not substitutingSome estimates suggest that current levels of AI technology could automate only about 15% of a reporter’s job and 9% of an editor’s job. Humans still have an edge over non-Hollywood AI in several key areas that are essential to journalism, including complex communication, expert thinking, adaptability and creativity.Reporting, listening, responding and pushing back, negotiating with sources, and then having the creativity to put it together—AI can do none of these indispensable journalistic tasks. It can often augment human work, though, to help people work faster or with improved quality. And it can create new opportunities for deepening news coverage and making it more personalized for an individual reader or viewer.Newsroom work has always adapted to waves of new technology, including photography, telephones, computers—or even just the copy machine. Journalists will adapt to work with AI, too. As a technology, it is already and will continue to change newswork, often complementing but rarely substituting for a trained journalist. New workI’ve found that more often than not, AI technologies appear to actually be creating new types of work in journalism.Take for instance the Associated Press, which in 2017 introduced the use of computer vision AI techniques to label the thousands of news photos it handles every day. The system can tag photos with information about what or who is in an image, its photographic style, and whether an image is depicting graphic violence. The system gives photo editors more time to think about what they should publish and frees them from spending lots of time just labeling what they have. But developing it took a ton of work, both editorial and technical: Editors had to figure out what to tag and whether the algorithms were up to the task, then develop new test data sets to evaluate performance. When all that was done, they still had to supervise the system, manually approving the suggested tags for each image to ensure high accuracy. Citation: Artificial intelligence-enhanced journalism offers a glimpse of the future of the knowledge economy (2019, June 11) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-artificial-intelligence-enhanced-journalism-glimpse-future.html This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. Robots won’t hold the pens just yet, but they can help people do the work. Credit: Paul Fleet/Shutterstock.com The Arria Studio user interface showing the composition of a personalized story about gun violence. Credit: Nicholas Diakopoulos screenshot of Arria Studio, CC BY-ND Stuart Myles, the AP executive who oversees the project, told me it took about 36 person-months of work, spread over a couple of years and more than a dozen editorial, technical and administrative staff. About a third of the work, he told me, involved journalistic expertise and judgment that is especially hard to automate. While some of the human supervision may be reduced in the future, he thinks that people will still need to do ongoing editorial work as the system evolves and expands. Semi-automated content productionIn the United Kingdom, the RADAR project semi-automatically pumps out around 8,000 localized news articles per month. The system relies on a stable of six journalists who find government data sets tabulated by geographic area, identify interesting and newsworthy angles, and then develop those ideas into data-driven templates. The templates encode how to automatically tailor bits of the text to the geographic locations identified in the data. For instance, a story could talk about aging populations across Britain, and show readers in Luton how their community is changing, with different localized statistics for Bristol. The stories then go out by wire service to local media who choose which to publish. The approach marries journalists and automation into an effective and productive process. The journalists use their expertise and communication skills to lay out options for storylines the data might follow. They also talk to sources to gather national context, and write the template. The automation then acts as a production assistant, adapting the text for different locations.RADAR journalists use a tool called Arria Studio, which offers a glimpse of what writing automated content looks like in practice. It’s really just a more complex interface for word processing. The author writes fragments of text controlled by data-driven if-then-else rules. For instance, in an earthquake report you might want a different adjective to talk about a quake that is magnitude 8 than one that is magnitude 3. So you’d have a rule like, IF magnitude > 7 THEN text = “strong earthquake,” ELSE IF magnitude < 4 THEN text = "minor earthquake." Tools like Arria also contain linguistic functionality to automatically conjugate verbs or decline nouns, making it easier to work with bits of text that need to change based on data.Authoring interfaces like Arria allow people to do what they're good at: logically structuring compelling storylines and crafting creative, nonrepetitive text. But they also require some new ways of thinking about writing. For instance, template writers need to approach a story with an understanding of what the available data could say—to imagine how the data could give rise to different angles and stories, and delineate the logic to drive those variations.Supervision, management or what journalists might call "editing" of automated content systems are also increasingly occupying people in the newsroom. Maintaining quality and accuracy is of the utmost concern in journalism. RADAR has developed a three-stage quality assurance process. First, a journalist will read a sample of all of the articles produced. Then another journalist traces claims in the story back to their original data source. As a third check, an editor will go through the logic of the template to try to spot any errors or omissions. It's almost like the work a team of software engineers might do in debugging a script—and it's all work humans must do, to ensure the automation is doing its job accurately.Developing human resourcesInitiatives like those at the Associated Press and at RADAR demonstrate that AI and automation are far from destroying jobs in journalism. They're creating new work—as well as changing existing jobs. The journalists of tomorrow will need to be trained to design, update, tweak, validate, correct, supervise and generally maintain these systems. Many may need skills for working with data and formal logical thinking to act on that data. Fluency with the basics of computer programming wouldn't hurt either.As these new jobs evolve, it will be important to ensure they're good jobs—that people don't just become cogs in a much larger machine process. Managers and designers of this new hybrid labor will need to consider the human concerns of autonomy, effectiveness and usability. But I'm optimistic that focusing on the human experience in these systems will allow journalists to flourish, and society to reap the rewards of speed, breadth of coverage and increased quality that AI and automation can offer.center_img Critical, contextualised journalism needed in the face of AI-produced copy Explore further Much as robots have transformed entire swaths of the manufacturing economy, artificial intelligence and automation are now changing information work, letting humans offload cognitive labor to computers. In journalism, for instance, data mining systems alert reporters to potential news stories, while newsbots offer new ways for audiences to explore information. Automated writing systems generate financial, sports and elections coverage. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Provided by The Conversationlast_img read more

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PM urges people in Telangana to end dynastic antidemocratic rule

first_imgPublished on BJP is the only party that’s different, says Modi Prime Minister Narendra Modi   –  THE HINDU TRS promises ₹1 lakh farm-loan waiver, enhanced pension, hike in retirement age SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENT Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Monday asked voters in Telangana to defeat parties that are run by families, dynasties and follow anti-democratic practices.Addressing a largely attended rally at the Lal Bahadur Stadium in Hyderabad, Modi said all the leading contenders in the fray — Telangana Rashtra Samithi (TRS), Congress, Telugu Desam Party (TDP) and the AIMIM — fit the above criterion. It was the BJP alone which was different, he said.“You might not like Modi, but if you like democracy and want peaceful development, the challenge before you is to finish family rule in one stroke on December 7”, the Prime Minister said claiming that all the four mentioned parties are a danger to Democracy.Referring to Telangana, he asked the youth, why did you ask for a separate State? Why so many young people sacrificed their lives? Not for giving one family to loo the State, isn’t it? Is the TRS a family party or not? Is it not the murder of Democracy? he said. Modi said the 130-year-old Congress, where great leaders sacrificed to build the party, is being run by one dynasty. “The TDP, founded by NT Rama Rao, to defend the Telugu pride and anti-Congress plank has been placed Rahul Gandhi’s lap by its leader N Chandrababu Naidu for narrow and opportunistic gains. Isn’t the AIMIM not a family-run party,” said Modi.Referring to Rahul’s constant jibe’s that TRS is Modi’s Team-B, the PM said in that Karnataka he used to say the Janata Dal Secular (JD-S) was the Team-B of the BJP. When the results came, it was the Congress which propped up HD Kumaraswamy and the JD(S) into power, thus demonstrating which was its real Team-B. On reservationOn the issue of the TRS regime promising 12 per cent reservations to minorities, Modi said the Supreme Court has put a ceiling, therefore KCR’s proposal means only a cut in existing reservations to SC/STs and OBCs. The BJP leader said, “Vote-bank politics will not help Vikas (development), nor change people’s life.” The PM charged that the KCR government’s decision to sail alone in development programmes was affecting people’s interests. He cited the construction of houses. “While Telangana government could provide only 5000 homes in five years, the NDA government handed over keys to 1.25 crore pucca houses to people in the same period. They celebrated Diwali in their homes,” Modi said.Similarly, in the Ayushman Bharat Yojana (health Insurance) scheme, three lakh people benefited in the last four months, but none was from Telangana as the CM decided not to join.Comparing the performance with the UPA-I and II’s rule for 10 years, Modi said the total number of houses handed over were 18, 000 in urban areas, whereas in four years, the NDA government gave 12 lakh. By March 2019 the number will be 25 lakhs, he said.The PM promised that by 2022 when India will be 75, every family will have a pucca home, with a water, electricity and LPG connection, a toilet and the owner will be the woman of the family and not the man. 25% of poll candidates in Telangana are Crorepatis, says ADR reportcenter_img SHARE politics Telangana December 03, 2018 RELATED COMMENTSlast_img read more

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22 policemen injured in Jharkhand road accident

first_img22 policemen injured in Jharkhand road accidentFifty-two Jharkhand Armed Police (JAP) personnel were on their way to Deoghar for the Shravani Mela duty from Ranchi when the bus driver lost control.advertisement Indo Asian News Service RanchiJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 18:20 IST (Image for representation)As many as 22 policemen were injured in a road accident in Jharkhand’s Ramgarh district on Saturday, the police said.Fifty-two Jharkhand Armed Police (JAP) personnel were on their way to Deoghar for the Shravani Mela duty from Ranchi when the bus driver lost control and hit a tree in the Sikidari valley.The condition of five of the injured constables is stated to be critical.Also Read | Need for speed on Yamuna Expressway remains uncontrolled despite deadly accidentsAlso Read | 10 killed, 35 injured after trains collide in PakistanAlso Watch | 7 dead, several injured after 11 coaches of Seemanchal Express derail in BiharFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byShifa Naseer Tags :Follow Road accidentFollow Jharkhand Nextlast_img read more

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