South Africa backs budding artists

first_img26 October 2015 Building a thriving arts industry would help youth stay away from crime, said Arts and Culture Minister Nathi Mthethwa at a meeting in Nyanga, a township in Cape Town, in Western Cape, on Friday, 23 October.His department was helping artists, he said, by honing the musical skills of the youth and teaching them how to create businesses in the arts.It had initiated sectorial and provincial consultations throughout the country because it was busy reviewing the White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage.Issues raisedCommunity members brought up challenges they faced, including a lack of access to information regarding opportunities the department offered, a lack of rehearsal space and being unable to access funding for cultural projects and events.“I have spoken to your community leaders and I know some of your challenges,” the minister said. “We are not here to make speeches, we are here to listen to your concerns and to see how we can help you with some of your challenges.”What’s being doneEstablished musicians such as Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse would hold music workshops to mentor young talent. The help from experienced musicians would also ensure that skills were passed on to current and future generations, the minister said.“An idle mind is a dangerous mind,” he cautioned.Source: South African Government News Agencylast_img read more

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Play Your Part episode three: Get involved with the initiatives

first_imgThe Play Your Part television series this week features Tebogo Ditshego, Karin Landi, and Tshiamo Legoale, all of whom contribute to making South Africa a better place. Here’s how you can get involved with them.Tshiamo Legoale, a geologist and researcher at metallurgical R&D organisation Mintek, is winner of the FameLab International 2017 contest. She is a guest on Play Your Part episode three. (Image: Mining Ne.Ws)Brand South Africa reporterGeologist and award-winning scientist Tshiamo Legoale, businessman Tebogo Ditshego and Karin Landi of Community Hours SA are the featured guests in episode three of the Play Your Part television series this week.These three extraordinary people share their stories on how they are shaping economic upliftment through education, empowerment, active citizenship, youth development, entrepreneurship, skills development and innovation.The episode, which will air on Saturday, 9 September 2017 at 18:00 on SABC 2, is hosted by Play Your Part ambassador Kabelo Mabalane. Artist and musician Mabalane is also a co-founder of the initiative, Shout for a Safer South Africa.The 26-episode Play Your Part series aims to inspire viewers to become active citizens and take part in volunteerism by profiling South Africans across the country who are doing extraordinary things to change people’s lives for the better.Here’s more on the three guests and how you can get involved with them:Tshiamo LegoaleLegoale is a 27-year-old geologist at Mintek who won the international competition FameLab Award. Her winning talk was on phytomining; as she puts it, she wants to “grow gold from wheat”, which essentially means using wheat plants to harvest gold from mine dumps.Legoale was one of three entrants from Africa in the FameLab competition, which was held in England. She received the FameLab award.Contact detailsWebsite: www.mintek.co.zaTwitter: @legoale_tshiamoTebogo DitshegoEntrepreneur Tebogo Ditshego (left) with actor Thapelo Mokoena at the fifth World Book Celebration. The annual event is hosted by Ditshego Media. (Image: Melissa Javan)Ditshego is CEO of Ditshego Media and founder of the initiative ReadABookSA, which is known as the biggest online book club in the country. He is also the chairman of the South African Reading Foundation.Ditshego, author of the self-published novel Kasi Nerd, talks about the concerns regarding literacy in South Africa and how he is working to overcome them.Through ReadABookSA, for example, people are challenged to read at least one book a month. The initiative has more than 39,700 followers on Twitter.Contact detailsWebsite: www.ditshegomedia.co.zaEmail: info@ditshegomedia.co.zaTwitter: @ReadABookSA or FacebookKarin LandiKarin Landi with Play Your Part series host Kabelo Mabalane. (Image: Play Your Part series)Landi is the co-founder of the online portal, Community Hours SA, which facilitates and manages community service for teenagers, parents, teachers, schools, active citizens and NPOs.Community Hours SA offers out of the box volunteering opportunities that encourage sustainable volunteering and active citizenship. In this episode, she talks about how it got teenagers involved with the initiative, Fight with Insight.Landi also serves on the governing body of the Johannesburg Junior Council and is the goodwill ambassador of the CEO SleepOut.Contact detailsWebsite: www.communityhourssa.co.zaEmail: hello@communityhours.co.zaTwitter: @communityhoursa or FacebookYou can also get involved with Fight with Insight on Facebook.Play Your Part broadcasts at 18:00 every Saturday on SABC 2.To get involved in playing your part in South Africa:Check out the conversation on Twitter: #GetInvolved; or,Find out about initiatives on Play Your Part here.Tell us how you Play Your Part through our social media channels:Follow us on Twitter: @PlayYourPartSA;Follow Brand South Africa on Twitter: @Brand_SA; andLike us on Facebook: Official Brand South Africa.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Understanding Zoom Lenses and How to Use Them Properly

first_imgBefore you go overboard with the zoom on your next shoot, learn how the lens works — and how to use it properly.Cover image via Shutterstock.Whether you’ve been guilty of this yourself or have seen others struggle, zoom-happy filmmaking can ruin a shoot and annoy audiences. That’s not to say zooming in and out is a bad thing; in fact, it’s actually a marvel of lens technology that we can zoom at all. And when you use it  intelligently, it can be quite effective.However, it is still easy to take the zoom for granted — especially now that filmmakers have handy stock lenses for DSLRs and mirrorless cameras that offer great flexibility and range to zoom easily and often. Let’s explore how zoom lenses work and some best practices to help you use them effectively, intelligently, and properly.How Zoom Lenses Work Image via Wikimedia.According to a good Wikipedia definition, “a zoom lens is a mechanical assembly of lens elements for which the focal length (and thus angle of view) can be varied, as opposed to a fixed focal length (FFL) lens (see prime lens).”That sounds pretty straightforward, but let’s dive into how the mechanisms work to change the focal length and your angle of view.As you can see in the gif above, a simplified zoom lens works by combining two parts: a focusing lens similar to your standard prime or fixed lenses and an afocal zoom system, which is the sliding element that does not focus on light. Rather,  it focuses on altering (thus magnifying) the size of the light. What’s important is that, while the zoom comes from this sliding lens, it is necessary to compensate for any movement of the focal plane to keep the focused image sharp — which means either you have to physically move the camera or move the focal plane to compensate.Because of this compensation, and in spite of how much flexibility a zoom offers, there are several factors you need to be aware of: noise, pincushioning, slower shutter response time, and a greater need for stability. Here’s a great video by Canon that provides more in-depth information — not just about zoom lenses but also how lenses work in general.How to Zoom Properly and SmoothlyImage via Peta Pixel.For filmmaking, it’s important to not only understand how your zoom works but also what zooming is meant to do for your audience. Zooms can be quite abrasive at times, which can be a stylistic decision, but it’s often an unwanted consequence.On many professional production shoots, zooming is intentional, and it relies on a focus puller to compensate — or with exact measurements in mind. On small DIY productions, you can purchase (or make) different devices to help smooth a zoom. Here are a few resources and tricks.The Death and Rebirth of the ZoomHow to get smooth camera movements using a rubber bandPrimes vs. Zooms: Situational EF Lens PrepVideography 101: Excellent Zooming TipsI’d be remiss not to mention that you can add many zoom effects in post-production as well. Here are some resources to consider for creating digital and stylized zoom effects.Smooth Zoom Video Effect Tutorial | Adobe Premiere ProHow to Create a 3D Parallax Zoom in Premiere ProGet to Know The Dynamic Zoom Tool In Resolve 14Create a Map Zoom Effect in FCPXKnow When to Zoom (and When Not To)Image via Shutterstock.Once you feel you’ve mastered the art of zooming, it’s time for you to decide when you actually want to use a proper zoom. Like Stanley Kubrick so aptly demonstrates in his classic Barry Lyndon, zooms can create quite a cinematic effect when used slowly and artistically. It is important, however, to note that the heyday of zoom technology in filmmaking was in the ’60s and ’70s. As such, in the case of self-aware filmmakers like Quinten Tarantino, a heavy-handed crash zoom in itself can be a retro-filmmaking technique.On the other hand, zooms have grown less popular in pure cinema settings. Instead, they have found a home in reality television, where they portray real life and home-video quality. You don’t have to look long or hard to find many essays on why you shouldn’t use zooms (or even many arguing more for dolly shots over zooms).At the end of the day, a zoom is a practical and stylistic option for your production, but it’s not a perfect tool for every situation. Pick your spots, focus on your intentions, and use your tools and resources wisely for optimal results.Looking for more information on zooms? Check out these resources.How to Create a Dolly Zoom With Just a Prime LensPrimes vs. Zooms — Situational EF Lens PrepThe Death and Rebirth of the ZoomVideo Editing: Snap Zooms Should Never Be a Snap Decisionlast_img read more

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Minister instigated looting: Tripura villagers

first_imgAbout 300 people of West Tripura district, who had fled the area after their homes were torched and looted over the alleged molestation of a girl, said on Saturday that they were scared to return.They alleged that the looting and ransacking of their houses in Lalit Bazaar locality under the Ranir Bazaar police station limit was instigated by Revenue Minister and prominent tribal leader N.C. Debbarma.Mr. Debbarma, president of the Indigenous People’s Front Tripura (IPFT), declined to comment on the charge. Prohibitory orders under Section 144 of the Cr.PC was promulgated in the area for 48 hours from 8 a.m. on Saturday, Sub-divisional Magistrate Subhasish Bandopaddhyaya said.A group of tribal youths started torching and looting houses only after the Minister’s visit on Friday, said the villagers who have taken shelter in a school. “The ransacking and looting of our houses started only after N.C. Debbarma visited the spot. He came here at 9 a.m. and looting of our houses started around an hour later,” 50-year-old Samena Khatun alleged.Scared to returnSulekha Khatun, aged 45, said, “My house was set ablaze, my belongings looted. I do not want to return. Let the police shoot me dead. I will not return.” The conflict began when a girl, along with her boyfriend, had come to Ranir Bazaar area on Thursday from a nearby locality to see Durga idols there and four youths allegedly molested her and snatched her phone. The girl and boy went back to their locality and returned with a large group of people who tried to attack the houses of those who reportedly molested the girl. The four accused were arrested on Friday but the attack on the village continued. A large contingent of police has been deployed in the area.last_img read more

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CWG scam: CAG indicts Delhi health department

first_imgThe Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) has found irregularities in procurement of medical equipment for the Games.The Commonwealth Games, hosted in the city last year, has come to be associated with a raft of scams. Here’s another.The Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) has found irregularities in procurement of medical equipment for the Games, causing loss of crores of rupees to the government exchequer.A CAG report states that the authorities concerned bought the equipment much above the market rates while beds and equipment at some designated hospitals were supplied only after the event got over.The authorities even issued fake work certificates for procuring items. The state-run GB Pant Hospital was designated for definitive care of accredited personnel along with AIIMS and RML Hospital. At GBP, a turnkey project for establishing an emergency block was approved by the government. The purchase committee approved the bid of M/ s Adison Equipment, which agreed to complete the supply, installation and commissioning of the system by August 20, 2010 at a cost of around Rs 5crore.According to the report, a review of expenditure revealed that a false work certificate was signed by a group of doctors on November 19 showing that the project was completed on September 6.”Installation of the turnkey project was possible in November after one month of the CWG. Whereas, this block was specially meant for the Games and the ground floor of the EDP building was specially modified for this purpose. The expenditure of Rs 5.15 crore thus proved unfruitful,” the report states. The report mentions that the hospital’s medical superintendent denied this and said the project was utilised fully for the CWG. Delhi BJP president Vijender Gupta on Tuesday said chief minister Sheila Dikshit was responsible for this scam and should immediately resign.advertisement”There should be a proper investigation and all officials, including the CM, should be booked,” he added.Gupta said the CAG’s findings vindicated earlier claims that there was a huge scam in the whole exercise of improving health facilities ahead of the CWG by the Delhi government.The CAG report says lack of proper planning resulted in non-utilisation of budget.The decision to hold the Games in Delhi was taken in 2003 and the Directorate of Health Services (DHS) was entrusted with the responsibility of providing health services.The budget was allotted from 2006-07 but the final action plan could be finalised only in September 2009. The percentage of utilisation of the allotted budget was 0.1 to 8.5 during 2006-10 and hundred per cent during 2010- 11, the overall utilisation being 33.44 per cent.Delays were a common feature of Games-related projects. Health- related projects were no exception. The report says that although there was enough time to make purchases and call for open tenders, the DHS and hospitals made purchases worth Rs 6.02crore without inviting tenders. In its reply, the DHS attributed this to paucity of time.WHAT THE CAG FOUND – 68 ice- machines for treating sports injuries bought at inflated costs, leading to a Rs 23lakh loss- 11 firms failed to deliver medical equipment worth ` 4lakh- Directorate of Health Services and Lok Nayak Hospital bought equipment worth more than Rs 6crore without inviting open tenders- Director of health services waited till the end so that he could justify purchases without tender- Most equipment came after the Games were over- A Rs 5 crore emergency block for sportspersons at Govind Ballabh Pant Hospital completed a month after Gameslast_img
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