Governor Wolf Announces Funding to Help Northumberland County Eliminate Blight

first_imgGovernor Wolf Announces Funding to Help Northumberland County Eliminate Blight August 03, 2018 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Economy,  Infrastructure,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced new funding to eliminate blight in municipalities across Northumberland County, revitalizing communities and bringing the potential for further economic development in the area.“Strong communities help to build a strong economy and my administration is committed to addressing blight and has invested in community redevelopment that enhances this goal,” said Governor Wolf. “Northumberland County has developed a unique blight elimination strategy. This investment will support the ongoing blight elimination efforts in Northumberland County and will greatly increase the quality of life for residents.”The Housing Authority of Northumberland County was awarded a $750,000 grant to support the county’s “Fight the Blight” initiative. The county will acquire and demolish approximately 60 blighted and abandoned properties in the county that will be redeveloped for commercial and housing purposes. Additionally, the housing authority will rehabilitate ten additional blighted structures to be sold to modest-income homebuyers. The project continues the highly successful effort launched by the housing authority in 2011 to work cooperatively with communities by identifying and prioritizing blighted properties for demolition and rehabilitation.The project is expected to bring economic growth through enhanced property values, a stronger local tax base, and increased commercial and residential development.Supported through the Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program (RACP) program, funding will support critical expansion projects, some of which will provide opportunities for additional economic development.last_img read more

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UK pensioners worse off in Brexit, says Treasury

first_imgUnder the “shock” scenario, higher inflation would erode the basic state pension by £137 per year in real terms by 2017-18 – compared with staying in the EU – while the “severe shock” scenario would increase this loss to £142 per year, said the analysis.Someone receiving a basic state pension and an average annuity would lose £190 a year in real terms, according to the calculation.The report also predicted declines in house prices and in UK equity and bond prices.It said: “After two years, the total loss of wealth of those aged over 65 would be around £170bn in the shock scenario and £300bn in the severe shock scenario. For a person aged over 65 with the median portfolio of housing and non-pension assets, the loss in wealth is estimated to be around £18,000 in the shock scenario and around £32,000 in the severe shock scenario.”Furthermore, the predicted long-term fall in incomes and profits would mean future pensioners were able to save less for their retirement, and earn lower investment returns, the report said.It calculated that someone currently aged 50 on median earnings, with median defined contribution pension assets, could lose between £3,800 and £5,800 from their pension savings by 2030 under the shock and severe shock scenarios, respectively.Based on current annuity rates, that would mean pensioners losing retirement income of between £223 and £335 per year, compared with remaining in the EU.But former work and pensions secretary Iain Duncan Smith, who supports Brexit, said: “I don’t accept there will be a short-term shock to the UK economy if we leave the EU. When Britain left the European exchange rate mechanism in 1992, instead of being a shock, it was a huge rise in income, and pensions did very well as a result.”Duncan Smith warned of “two big threats of remaining in the EU” for pensions.“They postponed the solvency directive [Solvency II], but it will come back again, and it is estimated their plans will cost UK pensions £400bn,” he said.“Secondly, and even bigger, is the harmonisation directive, which will really do damage.”He also warned that both these directives would be approved under qualified majority voting, so that the UK alone could not stop them. UK pensioners could lose up to £32,000 (€42,050) off their assets if the UK votes to leave the European Union (EU), according to an analysis published by the UK Treasury.But in contrast, a former work and pensions secretary warned that, if the UK stayed within the EU, EU pension directives could inflict major damage on pension funds.The Treasury analysis relies on the conclusion of its own macroeconomic research, which was that “a vote to leave would cause an immediate and profound economic shock creating instability and uncertainty, which would be compounded by the complex and interdependent negotiations that would follow”.George Osborne, chancellor of the Exchequer, said: “That shock would push our economy into a recession and lead to an increase in unemployment of around 500,000, average real wages would be lower, inflation higher, and house prices would be hit compared with a vote to remain.”last_img read more

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Q&A with USC’s Sophia Popov

first_imgDT: What would you say was the highlight of the Pac-10 championships?Popov: For me personally it was the playoffs in the end. I had a really good last round and I played okay the last two holes. I made a bogey on 17 so I kind of got caught up on that hole a little. I had to go into the playoffs and tied with [UCLA’s] Tiffany Lua and that was just very exciting for me because it was a nice way to finish a tournament. Daily Trojan: How did it feel winning both the team and individual titles at the Pac-10 championships?Sophia Popov: It was pretty exciting, mostly to win the team title because that was what we were really aiming for, and that was my main goal. We have been working really hard this season and we have won a couple of tournaments so we thought, ‘Let’s win that Pac-10 title.’ Winning it individually was great especially since it was my second one in a row. DT: What are your hopes for the upcoming NCAA regionals?Popov: For me, it’s to win with the team again. Obviously I want to play well individually. My expectations are high, but I know myself — no player can just keep it up that well. I just want to get a top finish and try to be satisfied with my game there and hopefully win with the team, and for the NCAAs pretty much the same. DT: Despite losing junior Lisa McCloskey, ranked third in the country, on the final day of competition due to injury, USC still came out on top. In what ways did her absence affect the team, if at all?Popov: I knew her back was bad because I was rooming with her and she was really not doing very well, so I had this feeling that she wasn’t going to be able to play because she was in a lot of pain. And so our coach just comes to us on the driving range before we teed off and said, ‘I think Lisa is not going to make it today.’ But I knew we still had four players and we can still score really low, so if we just hang in there, just play for Lisa, then that’s all we can really do. It was tough, but us four players showed we could shoot really low without her. So it was a loss definitely, but we could pull through pretty well. The No. 1 USC women’s golf team has been playing above par all season.Last week, the team won the 2011 Pac-10 championship, its fourth in program history and first since 2008.Not only did the Women of Troy take home the team title, but freshman Sophia Popov captured the Pac-10’s individual title.The Daily Trojan sat down with Popov to hear her thoughts on the season so far.Freshman sensation · Freshman Sophia Popov captured an individual Pac-10 championship, USC’s fourth ever in program history. – Photo courtesy of Sports Information DT: You are a freshman this year, but have already proven yourself as a valuable member of the team. How has your first year on the team been and what have you taken away from it?Popov: It’s been pretty great. It was kind of funny — my first tournament didn’t go very well. I played pretty bad because it took a little time to get used to everything here and it’s different from Europe. But I got my game up pretty fast. I won at Stanford in the fall and now I won two back-to-back tournaments, so obviously it’s been really good and I’ve jumped up the rankings now, too. I’m kind of overwhelmed by my game right now, but I’m trying to just keep my focus for the next two tournaments and hopefully I keep the momentum going. DT: How would you describe the course you and the rest of the team played on during the competition?Popov: The course was rather open and kind of challenging because it was kind of windy. In Arizona, it’s kind of like a desert course but it was a nice course. It was pretty wide, really tough greens. It wasn’t the most difficult course, but it was definitely challenging because of the wind and the conditions we had.last_img read more

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