Solar development taking hold in Kazakhstan

first_imgSolar development taking hold in Kazakhstan FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Magazine:JSC Kazakhstan Electricity and Power Market Operator (JSC KOREM) has revealed that the winner of the auction for a 50 MW solar power project in Kazakhstan’s Otyrar district is Italian oil and gas producer Eni.The group’s LLP Arm Wind unit offered the lowest price (not including VAT) of KZT 12.49 ($0.032)/kWh. “The ceiling auction price – KZT 29/kWh (excluding VAT) during the trading session decreased by 2.3 times,” JSC KOREM said.The 50 MW project is a joint initiative under the Ministry of Energy of the Republic of Kazakhstan, in cooperation with the UN Development Program. Eni is already active in the Kazakh energy market as a joint operator of the Karachaganak field. It is also an equity partner in various projects in the northern part of the Caspian Sea, including the giant Kashagan fieldThe auction has delivered a price which is lower by at least a third than those seen in the country’s first renewable energy auction in October 2018, when the final prices of the four selected PV projects, totaling 170 MW, ranged from KZT 18.6 to KZT 18.6.In another auction that was finalized in September, JSC KOREM selected a 10 MW PV project submitted by Russian developer Solnechnaya Sistema LLP, which offered a price of KZT 9.9/kWh, and a 26 MW solar project presented by KazSolar 50 LLP, which submitted a bid of KZT 16.97/kWh. The Solnechnaya Sistema LLP project will be built near the country’s Aral district, while the KazSolar 50 LLP plant will be built in the Shet district.Several more projects are being built outside the country’s auction scheme, including a 128 MW solar project by Total Eren and a 50 MW project by Suntech, among others. In January, German developer Goldbeck Solar said it had finished a 100 MW solar project near the town of Saran. That project also operates under a 15-year PPA, at a price of KZT34.61/kWh ($0.091). [Emiliano Bellini]More: Italy’s Eni wins Kazakhstan’s 50 MW solar auction with $0.032/kWh bidlast_img read more

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Unique Trinity Beach home takes waterfront living to a new level

first_imgMore from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms3 days agoTen auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns3 days agoThe home has attracted interest from domestic and overseas buyersSet on more than 2900sq m, 1-3 Wilma St features “supreme” ocean views and privacy.Selling agent Nicholas Slatyer of Belle Property Group said it was among the “top handful of beachfront blocks in Cairns”.“The house is elevated, alleviating some people’s fears of storm surges and the effects of global warming,” he said.“We are halfway through the expressions of interest campaign and have had reasonable interest from local and interstate buyers.“These sorts of opportunities rarely come up and many of these beachfront properties have been occupied for a long time.”Offers in excess of $3 million have been suggested, but Mr Slatyer said the vendor was willing to meet the market.“Ultimately I think the buyer will renovate the existing house or knock it over and start again,” he said. “The home is very nice and in great condition, but it’s also quite old.” The property is for sale by formal offer, closing May 24. 1-3 Wilma St, Trinity BeachA SPECTACULAR Far North beachfront property is on the market, giving would-be buyers a rare chance to live out the ultimate tropical dream.The five-bedroom mansion at 1-3 Wilma St is just a short stroll from the famous sands of Trinity Beach.In fact, the property’s title extends to the high-water mark, allowing its owner to literally lay claim to their personal slice of beach.The sale comes following the death last year of the home’s long-standing owner Marie Parker (nee Van Hove), a renowned opera pianist.Mrs Parker’s late husband David was a top-flight singer and spent many years teaching at the ANU School of Music in Canberra.The couple’s influential role in the Australian opera scene was highlighted by an article written in the ANU Reporter following Mr Parker’s death in 1996: “After the demise of Canberra Opera in 1984 he and his wife … established the ANU Opera Workshop to provide opera experience for local singers, mounting small-scale but professionally executed productions of baroque operas in the ANU Arts Centre”. It is understood the talented duo bought the Trinity Beach property as their retirement home, with many of their prominent musician friends visiting over the years. Mrs Parker was 89 when she died on October 30.last_img read more

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A Mother’s Day Visit at Prison

first_imgINDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — About 54,000 children are incarcerated in the U.S., which means their families will be spending this Mother’s Day weekend without them, or visiting them wherever they’re locked up.Many of those moms are now fighting to end mass incarceration of young people and to make sure when teens are behind bars, they’re treated correctly.Karen Dolan at the Institute for Policy Studies is coauthor of a new report, Mothers At the Gate. She says the justice system is too hard on kids, and adds behaviors that used to be considered childish, are now criminal offenses.“Children that have been in a fight, or that have been disruptive in school, or that in some cases have merely watched fights,” says Dolan. “And all of these behaviors now are becoming so criminalized, especially in areas that are high-poverty and that tend to be black and Latino.”The report documents the movement by families to keep kids out of jail, keep them from being put in solitary confinement, and break what Dolan calls the “school-to-prison pipeline” because of what she calls “over-policing” in the education system.Lois Demott’s 15-year-old son was sent to prison and she says there were no support groups to help her once he was locked up, so she started “Citizens for Prison Reform.” Demott believes parents and community members in Indiana need to pool resources so they can help each other.“How to set up phone time, how to send money, understanding the system,” she says. “We realized that there was a huge hole, and I saw just how many families were overwhelmed and lost, not knowing how to do basic things.”Demott says it’s not just about her son anymore – for her, it’s about fighting for every child.last_img read more

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