Wisconsin finishes 4th at Big Ten tourney

first_imgOn a day when most people were inside trying to stay warm, the women golfers of the Big Ten were participating in the 37th annual Big Ten Championship.The tournament was held at University Ridge Golf Course in Verona, and with a temperature of 45 degrees and winds up to 16 mph, conditions were far from ideal.“It was a very challenging day,” Wisconsin head coach Todd Oehrlein said. “The tough conditions made it difficult, but it boils down to character and mental toughness, the willingness to go out there and compete the whole round.”Coach Oehrlein has preached this all year to his team and today was a prime example of why. His players seemed to get the memo.“I don’t mind the bad weather for the most part, because I tend to concentrate on my game more,” UW junior Carly Werwie said. “You just have to make sure not to get frustrated too easily or else you’ll be in for a long day.”Of the 66 participants, Werwie finished tied for seventh with an eight over par. Her teammate, senior Molly Schemm, came into the tournament playing extremely well, finishing the previous two weekends as the top scorer for UW. Schemm ended the fourth round with a 76 and shot 14 over par for the entire tournament, good for 20th place.For the third year in a row, the nation’s eighth-ranked Purdue Boilermakers won the Big Ten Tournament as a team. The winning didn’t stop there, as freshman Boilermaker Laura Gonzalez took first in individuals with an eight under par. It was quite an accomplishment considering the expectations of her prior to the tournament. Without a tournament victory to her name at the collegiate level, not many people felt confident or even considered the idea of Gonzalez having a chance at winning the biggest tournament of the year. This didn’t seem to matter to Gonzalez though, who wasn’t focused on those around her.“I didn’t even realize exactly where I was on the leader board,” Gonzalez said. “I didn’t even want to know.”What made her accomplishment even more impressive was the fact that she shot the rounds low score of 69 on a day where everyone was struggling with the treacherous conditions. In fact, Gonzalez’s three under par was the only sub-par score of the round. In a situation where everyone else seemed to struggle in the bleak weather, Gonzalez shined, which she attributes to her hometown of La Hulpe, Belgium.“Being from Belgium, I’m used to the bad weather,” Gonzalez said.The last round did not go as smoothly for other golfers, including freshman and Madison-native Alyssa Elliot, who finished the tournament 21 over par. When everyone opens up the newspaper and glances at the results, some may chalk up Elliot’s weekend as a struggle, but look further. Until Sunday, Elliot was only nine over par with nine birdies in the first 54 holes.By finishing 48 over par as a team the Badgers placed fourth in the tournament. With this, UW is on the verge of a NCAA Tournament bid. Fans and players can’t help but get excited, but Oehrlein wants to take a more subtle approach.“Let’s just get in first,” he said.But tomorrow’s decision of whether UW will make the tournament will not determine success for the Badgers.“Just to play for Wisconsin is an honor in itself,” Schemm said. “I couldn’t be happier.”last_img read more

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PAHO/WHO Urges Northern Hemisphere Countries to Prepare for Heatwaves

first_imgWashington, D.C. (PAHO) – In view of the current heatwaves in Europe and predictions that this phenomenon will hit various parts of the Americas, the Pan American Health Organization/ World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) is urging countries in the North American, Central American and Caribbean region to be prepared for heatwaves, due to the impact that this could have on peoples’ health, including the risk of death.The heatwaves that have had the greatest impact since 2000 were the one in Brazil in 2010 that caused the death of 737 people, and the one in Argentina in the summer of 2013-2014 that caused 1,877 deaths and left 800,000 people with no power, which increased heat stress in that population. According to health authorities in the United States, heatwaves are the natural phenomenon that caused the highest number of deaths in that country.Weather forecasts for North America, Central America and the Caribbean (the Region) predict heat waves during the summer of 2019. This could increase drought-induced stress, lead to forest fires, and have harmful effects on human health.Contingency plans to address heatwaves Due to the situation, PAHO has developed a guide to help countries in the Region formulate contingency plans to address heatwaves. This guide provides recommendations that the health sector and meteorological agencies can implement to prepare for and better respond to this threat, promote health, prevent the adverse effects of heatwaves, treat affected people, and save lives.The document stresses that heatwave contingency plans should be able to determine the extent of the threat, with alert activation procedures, a description of roles and functions, and intra- and inter-agency coordination mechanisms.The document also highlights that countries should strengthen the epidemiological surveillance of heat-related morbidity and mortality, the capacity of health services (training of staff, improvements in the design of new hospitals, and equipping of existing hospitals in high-risk areas), and enhance the actions of local authorities, the media, and communities in terms of inter-agency response measures, prevention measures, and self-care. The impact of heatwaves on health Exposure to heat causes severe symptoms such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke (a condition which causes faintness, as well as dry, warm skin, due to the inability of the body to control high temperatures). The majority of heat-related deaths are due to the worsening of cardiopulmonary, renal, endocrine and psychiatric conditions. Other symptoms include edema in the lower limbs, heat rash on the neck, cramps, headache, irritability, lethargy and weakness.People with chronic diseases that take daily medications have a greater risk of complications and death during a heatwave, as do older people and children.Reactions to heat depend on each person’s ability to adapt and serious effects can appear suddenly. This is why it is important to pay attention to the alerts and recommendations of local authorities.Preventing the harmful effects of heatStay tuned to weather alerts and forecasts.Avoid sun exposure between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.Do not leave children or older persons in parked vehiclesDo not exercise or engage in intense outdoor activities without proper protectionDrink water every 2 hours, even if you aren’t thirsty.Keep the home cool by covering windows during the day and using air conditioners or fans during the hottest hours.If you have a chronic disease and take drugs, consult your doctor. What to do if there are signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion or heat stroke:Heatstroke is a life-threatening medical emergency. The individual should receive medical care in a hospitalStop all physical activity.Call an ambulance immediately.Go to or move the affected person to a cool site.Use any physical means to facilitate cooling (such as cooling the head and body down with water and fanning the person to reduce their temperature).Warning signs in moderate and severe cases:Heat exhaustion:Heavy sweatingCool, pale skinTemperature < 40º CDizziness or faintnessHeadacheRapid breathingWeak, rapid pulse Heatstroke:Red, hot, and dry skinTemperature > 40ºCThrobbing headacheUnconscious or in a comaRapid, strong pulselast_img read more

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