Grizzlies 132, Warriors 117: Kevin Durant explains what led to his 16th technical

first_imgKlay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up!MEMPHIS -– Kevin Durant shook his head repeatedly with dismay.The Warriors’ star did not say a single word to any official. Yet, official Karl Lane issued Durant a technical. The Warriors’ 132-117 loss to the Memphis Grizzlies in their regular-season finale on Wednesday proved inconsequential after already locking up the No. 1 seed earlier this week. But this …last_img

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Flies Turn on a Dime

first_img51; A fly can turn 180 degrees in one tenth the time it takes you to blink an eye.  Beating their wings 250 times a second, they don’t even have to think about each wing beat, PhysOrg said about studies at Brown University using high-speed cameras and image tracking software.  “[Attila] Bergou discovered that flies rely less on their brains than previously thought and more on the clever design of their wings,” the article said.  “To make a turn, a fly simply twitches a muscle that rolls its shoulder slightly.  The wing does the rest, naturally adjusting over the course of a few beats, tilting by about 9 degrees, and creating drag forces that wheel the insect around.”  The article includes a 32-second video clip that allows you to watch the turn in slow motion.    The U-turn of the fly is much faster than anything man-made can achieve.  A scientist at Harvard is looking enviously at the fly, the article said, for envisioning electrical flying robots that may some day come close to matching the fly’s design specifications.Evolution makes sense when you think in generalities.  When you look at things in detail, and measure what is required to make them function, you start thinking in terms of design specifications.  You want to imitate them.  When you try to imitate them, and find out how hard it is, you become an intelligent design believer.  Darwinian excuses like, “Evolution had a million year head start,” begin to sound like desperate question-begging attempts to hang onto an obsolete dogma that has lost its credibility in the details.(Visited 39 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi head sees self-driving dominance in 5 years

first_imgBreak the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and… Autonomous cars will dominate the streets by 2022, according to Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi Alliance Chairman Carlos Ghosn. The firm, which has an established autonomous car program, wants to give drivers control of their cars; their autonomous cars are not driverless cars — instead, drivers can decide when they want to drive and when they want the car to drive for them.Ghosn says that autonomous cars provide a “huge advantage” for drivers, and as a result, the industry will have “massive growth” in the coming years. Instead of focusing on the road for hours at a time, people can “rest … relax … see a movie” while the car does its work for them.See also: Renault and Powervault partner to power home battery units With autonomous cars featured heavily in news reports — and even spotted in several testing-ground locations in the United States — the hype surrounding autonomous cars begs the question: when will we see autonomous cars on the road?Ghosn believes that most cars will have autonomous technology, as well as some kind of connectivity, by 2022.In much of the developed world, people spend a lot of time in their cars. The United States and Australia feature at the low end of the spectrum, with people averaging about one hour per day in their car, while in parts of Europe and China, people spend an average of two hours per day driving.Self-driving race is onAutonomous cars will free up that time so that people can be more productive; those hours can be used to work on reports or presentations, or even increase the amount of time people can spend with friends and family. This increased leisure time, Ghosn says, will improve people’s quality of life.Competition for the quickest development and launch of autonomous cars is on the rise, especially between technology behemoths Google, Uber and Apple, who have all started and are developing autonomous and driverless car programs. Still, Ghosn says that Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi Alliance is well-poised to dominate the autonomous car market.While Google, Uber and Apple all look to electric cars as the future, Ghosn claims, the Alliance has already dominated the electric car market with the Nissan Leaf, and the Alliance as a whole has sold more than 420,000 electric vehicles around the world.Ghosn believes that the Alliance’s historically successful development of electric cars will give them the upper hand in the race to create the best-selling autonomous car of our time. 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle… For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… Related Posts center_img Tags:#Apple#autonomous vehicles#Google#Internet of Things#IoT#Mitsubishi#Nissan#Renault#Self-Driving#self-driving cars#Uber IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A… Maya Raolast_img read more

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Mounties widow wants moveover law broadened for Nova Scotia highways

first_imgHALIFAX – The widow of a Mountie who was struck by a van while helping motorists change a flat tire wants to see a broadening of Nova Scotia’s so-called move-over law.“I actually think that the law should be extended to anybody who is pulled over to the side of the road, whether there is emergency lights flashing or four ways,” Savannah Deschenes said Tuesday at the Nova Scotia legislature.Her husband, Nova Scotia RCMP Const. Frank Deschenes, was assisting two people in an SUV when a cargo van plowed into his cruiser and the SUV on Sept. 12 in Memramcook, N.B.Savannah Deschenes said Tuesday that widening protections would create public awareness of a 2010 law that currently requires drivers to slow down and move into another lane when they approach emergency vehicles stopped at the side of the road.“It’s important to me because my husband was killed in an accident on duty,” Deschenes told reporters.“He had his emergency lights activated and he was still struck. It’s time that everyone become aware of it (the law) and care.”The Progressive Conservatives introduced amendments that would place signage highlighting the law on all 100-series highways and would rename the law as Frankie’s Law in honour of the late officer from Amherst, N.S.The NDP had previously introduced a bill that would reduce a vehicle’s speed to no more than 60 kilometres per hour when passing a tow truck stopped at the scene of a fire or an accident and exhibiting a flashing light.Premier Stephen McNeil said the government would look at all of the proposed changes.“We will take all of the suggestions that are brought forward and combine them perhaps into a single bill,” he said.In December, the 31-year-old Pennsylvania man who was driving the van that struck Frank Deschenes was fined $3,000 and banned from driving for two years by a Moncton, N.B., court.Vasiliy Meshko was also placed on probation for two years after pleading guilty to driving without due care.Savannah Deschenes displayed for reporters her husband’s dogtag and a silver bullet casing containing some of his ashes that she wears around her neck.She said her husband, whom she married only months before his death, is “with me at all times.”“We didn’t have the typical date nights like dinner and a movie — we would go shooting his rifles and his personal pistol. This (bullet) was just fitting because we were always at the range.”The 35-year-old officer was known as a dedicated Mountie who worked hard to teach drivers about the need to slow down when driving past emergency vehicles.Originally from northwest New Brunswick, Deschenes was a former member of the force’s famed Musical Ride.last_img read more

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Alec Baldwin Calls On Government To Shut Down Cherokee Bear Zoo

first_imgIn a letter sent this week on behalf of PETA, actor Alec Baldwin is calling on the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to ban bear pits.Addressing Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, Baldwin notes that while bears in the wild spend their time exploring diverse terrain, foraging for food, and digging in soft earth, captive bears are confined to cramped and barren concrete pits, which can lead to psychological distress, arthritis, pressure sores, and other painful, debilitating conditions.The actor writes, “Animal advocates like me depend on the USDA to protect animals who are used for entertainment from lives of deprivation, pain, and abuse …. I’m writing to you today to ask that the USDA recognize the cruelty and danger inherent in bear pits and ban this archaic form of confinement without delay.”Baldwin is also urging families to stay away from roadside zoos this summer in a new video for PETA: “People talk about the right to bear arms. After seeing this video, you might want to push for the right to arm bears.” The video, available here, goes on to show some of the several hundred bears who are displayed across the U.S. in tiny cages and barren pits, where they have little to do but pace in circles, beg for food from tourists, and break their teeth by gnawing on cage bars.“As long as well-meaning people continue to go to roadside zoos and shows, the bears will continue to suffer,” concludes Baldwin in the video. “The most important action that you can take for captive bears is simply to stop supporting their abuse: Please, steer clear of roadside zoos, bear pits, and fairs where they are forced to perform.”To date, PETA — whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to use for entertainment or abuse in any other way” — has rescued more than 50 captive bears, including Fifi, a Syrian brown bear who spent more than 30 years in a barren cage at a ramshackle roadside zoo, and transferred them to reputable sanctuaries.Source:PETAlast_img read more

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