21 hours agoLiverpool make January transfer window call

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Liverpool make January transfer window callby Paul Vegas21 hours agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool expect to have a quiet January transfer window.The Reds have enjoyed a flying start to the new Premier League season, currently sitting six points clear of Manchester City having won eight of their nine matches so far.Liverpool are also on course to make the knockout stages of the Champions League having breezed past Genk with a 4-1 win on Wednesday night.With Jurgen Klopp’s side flying high, the Liverpool Echo says it’s unlikely the Merseyside giants will splash the cash when the transfer window reopens in the New Year.It’s claimed that it will take a ‘huge unforeseen struggle’ for Klopp to delve into the market. last_img read more

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Telecom Italias wholesale TV deal with Sky is due

first_imgTelecom Italia’s wholesale TV deal with Sky is due to go live in April, allowing Telecom Italia customers to gain access the full Sky television offer through its high-speed broadband network.Speaking on Telecom Italia’s fourth quarter earnings call, company CEO Marco Patuano said that Sky will provide a set-top box for the internet TV offering and that the non-exclusive deal means “we will have the same content that Sky will have.”The deal, which was first announced in April 2014, will see the companies co-operate on a revenue sharing basis, with the agreement allowing Sky to reach potential pay TV subscribers who are unable to install a satellite dish.Speaking more broadly about the pay TV opportunity in Italy, Patuano said that this market was still “under-penetrated” with just 25% of homes subscribing to pay TV, compared to between 50% and 60% in the UK and France.He said there was opportunity to target broadband subscribers with “some form of premium content television or premium content entertainment.”However, Patuano added that “we have no space for making huge discounts, in order to move customers to convergence, even if the effect on the churn rate is positive.”last_img read more

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New study supports use of ZnO nanoparticles in sunscreens

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 4 2018Zinc oxide (ZnO) has long been recognized as an effective sunscreen agent. However, there have been calls for sunscreens containing ZnO nanoparticles to be banned because of potential toxicity and the need for caution in the absence of safety data in humans. An important new study provides the first direct evidence that intact ZnO nanoparticles neither penetrate the human skin barrier nor cause cellular toxicity after repeated application to human volunteers under in-use conditions. This confirms that the known benefits of using ZnO nanoparticles in sunscreens clearly outweigh the perceived risks, reports the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.The safety of nanoparticles used in sunscreens has been a highly controversial international issue in recent years, as previous animal exposure studies found much higher skin absorption of zinc from application of ZnO sunscreens to the skin than in human studies. Some public advocacy groups have voiced concern that penetration of the upper layer of the skin by sunscreens containing ZnO nanoparticles could gain access to the living cells in the viable epidermis with toxic consequences, including DNA damage. A potential danger, therefore, is that this concern may also result in an undesirable downturn in sunscreen use. A 2017 National Sun Protection Survey by the Cancer Council Australia found only 55 percent of Australians believed it was safe to use sunscreen every day, down from 61 per cent in 2014.Investigators in Australia studied the safety of repeated application of agglomerated ZnO nanoparticles applied to five human volunteers (aged 20 to 30 years) over five days. This mimics normal product use by consumers. They applied ZnO nanoparticles suspended in a commercial sunscreen base to the skin of volunteers hourly for six hours and daily for five days. Using multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, they showed that the nanoparticles remained within the superficial layers of the stratum corneum and in the skin furrows. The fate of ZnO nanoparticles was also characterized in excised human skin in vitro. They did not penetrate the viable epidermis and no cellular toxicity was seen, even after repeated hourly or daily applications typically used for sunscreens.Related StoriesCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedMany thyroid cancer patients have no choice about radioactive iodine, study revealsStudy shows connection between poor sleep and poor nutrition”The terrible consequences of skin cancer and photoaging are much greater than any toxicity risk posed by approved sunscreens,” stated lead investigator Michael S. Roberts, PhD, of the Therapeutics Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, and School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Sansom Institute, Adelaide, QLD, Australia.”This study has shown that sunscreens containing nano ZnO can be repeatedly applied to the skin with minimal risk of any toxicity. We hope that these findings will help improve consumer confidence in these products, and in turn lead to better sun protection and reduction in ultraviolet-induced skin aging and cancer cases,” he concluded.”This study reinforces the important public health message that the known benefits of using ZnO nano sunscreens clearly outweigh the perceived risks of using nano-sunscreens that are not supported by the scientific evidence,” commented Paul F.A. Wright, PhD, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC, Australia, in an accompanying editorial. “Of great significance is the investigators’ finding that the slight increase in zinc ion concentrations in viable epidermis was not associated with cellular toxicity under conditions of realistic ZnO nano sunscreen use.Source: https://www.elsevier.com/last_img read more

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New hope for treating devastating brain cancer in children

first_img Source:https://www.rockefeller.edu/news/25535-new-hope-treating-childhood-brain-cancer/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 5 2019There could be new treatments on the horizon for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, or DIPG, a devastating form of brain cancer that afflicts young children and is currently incurable. Recent experiments in animal models of the disease have identified an experimental drug that effectively destroys DIPG cells. And a team of Rockefeller scientists just figured out how this promising compound works.The research, described in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that the drug acts on cellular cholesterol pathways, and suggests that these pathways may be fruitful targets for treating a variety of brain cancers.Targeting tumorsDIPG tumors are located in the pons, a highly sensitive structure that connects the brain to the spinal cord. Surgical removal of tumors is effectively impossible since it poses the risk of fatal brain damage. And although radiation can be used to temporarily reduce symptoms, the cancer inevitably grows, with an average survival rate of less than one year. Which is to say: there is a pressing need for new ways to treat children with the disease.An auspicious development came in 2014 from a collaboration between the labs of C. David Allis, the Joy and Jack Fishman Professor, and Viviane Tabar, Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). The team showed that a compound known as MI-2 stops tumor growth in a mouse model of DIPG. The drug was already on scientists’ radar for the treatment of leukemia, and was known to work on leukemia cells by interacting with menin, a protein that regulates gene expression. So when Allis’ team began investigating the effect of MI-2 on DIPG cells, they initially suspected that it would work in a similar manner.”Our first hypothesis was that the drug switched off genes by interacting with menin,” says Richard Phillips, a neuro-oncologist at MSKCC and a visiting fellow in the Allis lab who spearheaded this effort. “But as we probed a little bit further, many of the things that we would expect to see didn’t pan out.”Related StoriesResearchers report how a popular antidepressant drug could rewire the brainHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerFor example, when the researchers genetically removed menin from glioma cells, those cells remained sensitive to MI-2, indicating that the compound exerted its effects via a pathway distinct from that observed in leukemia. The scientists then discovered that DIPG cells exposed to MI-2 failed to maintain healthy levels of cholesterol, and quickly died; but the cells could be rescued with a dose of supplemental cholesterol–suggesting that, in the case of glioma, MI-2 works by depleting the nutrient. Eventually, the researchers discovered that MI-2 directly inhibits lanosterol synthase, an enzyme involved in cholesterol production.The researchers also found that, while MI-2 destroys glioma cells, the drug doesn’t damage normal brain cells. This finding is consistent with other research showing that some cancer cells are particularly vulnerable to cholesterol disturbances.Building better drugsThis study contributes to a growing body of research pointing to cholesterol interference as a promising new way to treat cancer. Moving forward, Phillips and his colleagues hope to develop compounds that are optimized for targeting brain cancer. As a starting point, they are studying a number of cholesterol-reducing compounds that are already on the market.”Some existing drugs, initially made for people with high cholesterol, were designed to target lanosterol synthase–but they were never really thought of as cancer drugs,” he says. “One of them is even more potent than MI-2, so we’re now working with a team of chemical biologists to see if we can modify the drug so that it reaches the brain.”More broadly, this research highlights the importance of knowing not just that a drug works, but how it works. In this case, the discovery that MI-2 acts on lanosterol synthase revealed that DIPG tumors are sensitive to cholesterol interference–a finding that opens avenues for the production of even more effective compounds.Says Phillips: “You can’t assume that what it says on the label is actually how a drug works.”last_img read more

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Researchers use brain scans to provide better understanding of unconscious bias

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 24 2019Unconscious bias has become a hot topic recently, with high profile incidents reported around the world. Researchers at Aalto University are exploring the causes of these biases in our neural wiring, and are developing techniques using MRI scanners that let us see the brain making assumptions in real time. The results show for the first time that the brain is not only unconsciously biased towards people based on appearance, but it also forms biases based on what we know about the person as well.Peoples’ brains are naturally biased towards other people who are the same as them – a behavioral trait scientists call ‘in-group favoritism’. The opposite trait is also true: people are often naturally biased against people who are not the same as them, called ‘out-group derogation’. Mamdooh Afdile – a filmmaker studying for a PhD in neuroscience at Aalto University – decided to use cinema to explore this.Afdile used the film Priest to create a 20-minute stimulus film version that explored biases in two social groupings: heterosexual and homosexual men. ‘If knowledge gained from our social environment can implicitly bias how we perceive each other, this should hold true to characters in movies as well,’ Afdile explained. To see if watching the movie biased the viewers subconsciously, Afdile flashed the face of the protagonist repeatedly for a brief duration of 40 milliseconds before and after showing the movie.Even though the viewer wouldn’t be able to notice being shown a person’s face – much less have time to recognize the person – their subconscious brain responded to the flashed face based on whether or not they had become biased. By using functional MRI, the researchers were able to detect how people’s biases could be changed.Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustRush University Medical Center offers new FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysmsIn the beginning of the movie, the viewer gets the impression that the priest is heterosexual and falling in love with a woman. At the 10 minute mark, the viewer finds out the priest is in fact in love with another man. The study groups watching the film consisted of 14 homosexual and 15 heterosexual men, and the team measured the bias felt by each group towards the priest character when they thought he was straight, and when they knew he was gay.The social groupings were chosen by the researchers because, unlike race or gender, we cannot perceive another person’s sexual orientation just by looking at their face – so any bias response by the participants in the experiment toward the face presented to them would be dependent on what they came to know about the person. The subconscious response to the face of the protagonist after seeing the movie, compared to before seeing it, was significantly different between the two groups, and this result was not symmetrical. The results from the heterosexual group showed a very mild negative bias response, and interestingly those from the homosexual group showed a very strong response in brain regions associated with in-group, such as empathy and favoritism.These results are interesting for our understanding of unconscious bias because they demonstrate that the brain responds in a biased way to traits it can’t detect using our basic senses.’This study shows the brain can be biased based on learned knowledge and not only by external factors,’ explains. Mamdooh Afdile. By combining movies with subliminal measurement we can now investigate the subconscious brain in ways that were extremely difficult before.’ Source:https://www.aalto.fi/news/brain-scans-on-movie-watchers-reveal-how-we-judge-peoplelast_img read more

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Selfheating drinks cans set for a relaunch—heres how they work

first_img Citation: Self-heating drinks cans set for a relaunch—here’s how they work (2018, June 20) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-self-heating-cans-relaunchhere.html These were essentially a stove and can rolled into one, with a tube of cordite (more typically used as the propellant in small arms ammunition) running through the centre of the can to act as fuel. The cans were quick and easy to use and could be lit with a cigarette, allowing troops to prepare a hot meat in under five minutes. Unfortunately, they also had a tendency to explode, showering the assembled squaddies with piping hot soup. Since then, there have been numerous attempts to make self-heating cans into a mainstream product. Most relied on a rather less explosive reaction to provide the heat, although some have still struggled with the problem of not blowing up. Quicklime (calcium oxide) heats up rapidly when mixed with water. But it’s not particularly efficient, producing about 60 calories of energy per gram of reactant (one calorie will heat up one millilitre of water by 1℃).The upshot is that, to heat the drink by 40℃, you need a heating element that takes up nearly half the packaging. That’s just about OK if you want a small drink on a warm day, but in the depths of winter, when you might really want a hot drink, you only end up with a tepid coffee. Credit: shutterstock Thermite – in slo-mo. Thermite is an extreme example of an exothermic reaction, a chemical reaction that produces energy in the form of light and heat. Fire, typically the result of a reacting carbon and oxygen, is probably the exothermic reaction we are most familiar with. But there are plenty more. In fact many of the very same troops who were landing on the Normandy beaches that day had another example in their ration packs, in the form of self-heating cans of soup. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Provided by The Conversation Self-heating cocoa. Credit: University of Cambridge The imposing cliffs of Pointe de Hoc overlook the Normandy beaches where Allied troops landed on June 6 1944. The assaults marked the beginning of the liberation of German occupied Europe. And the cliff tops were the perfect spot for artillery pieces capable of devastating any troops who tried to attack the Ohama and Utah beachheads.The Allied command knew this and so, to sure up the attack, the navy bombarded Pointe de Hoc. Afraid this might not be enough, they also had a backup plan. A team of US Rangers scaled the shear 30-metre cliffs and, after locating the weaponry, they deployed their grenades, destroying the guns. The key to their success was the choice of thermite-based charges. These weren’t the kind of “high explosives” normally found in grenades, but instead used a chemical reaction that produced temperatures hot enough to melt the steel of the artilleries’ firing mechanisms.Surprisingly, the thermite the rangers used is incredibly simple. It is just rust (iron oxide) and powdered aluminium. Mixed together they are entirely safe and stable – that is until the mixture is given an energetic kick, typically by lighting a magnesium metal fuse. And then the fireworks start. The aluminium grabs the oxygen from the rust and in the process produces iron and a huge about of heat. The reaction can easily reach 2,500℃, hot enough to produce molten (liquid) iron.The following video shows the reaction in slow motion. The bright light at the start is just the magnesium burning. Then, when the fuse burns down to the thermite, things get impressive, leaving a melted tube and a flaming puddle of iron. Explore further A US technology firm is hoping to make a very old idea finally work by launching self-heating drinks cans. HeatGenie recently received US$6m to bring their can design to market in 2018, more than 15 years after Nestle abandoned a similar idea. Yet the principles behind the technology go back much further to 1897, when Russian engineer Yevgeny Fedorov invented the first self-heating can. So how do these cans work, why no one has managed to make them a success, and what’s HeatGenie’s new approach? To answer that, we have to go back to World War II. More powerful cansWhat’s needed is a much more efficient reaction. Something, like thermite perhaps? As crazy as packing a can with a reaction capable of disabling an artillery gun may seem that’s just what HeatGenie is planning. Over the last ten years, the firm has filed numerous patents describing the use of thermite within self-heating cans. It turns out the reaction used by the US Rangers is still too hot to handle, so they’ve dialled things back a bit by replacing the rust with a less reactive but no less familiar material, silicon dioxide. So the latest generation of heated cans is fuelled on aluminium and ground-up glass.When this reaction is triggered it still kicks out a whopping 200 calories per gram of reactant and can achieve 1,600℃. Given the troubled history of self-heating packaging, releasing this much energy from the can in your hand might be a bit of a concern, so several of HeatGenie’s patents cover safety issues.These include a complex arrangement of “firewalls” that can block the so-called “flamefront” should things get too hot, and energy-absorbing “heatsinks” to ensure the heat is efficiently transmitted around the drink, as well as vents to let off any steam. With all that is place, the company claims just 10% of the packaging is taken up by the heating elements, which can still produce a warm coffee in two minutes (although the exact temperature hasn’t been revealed). So, well over a century on from Fedorov’s first efforts, has HeatGenie final cracked the self-heating can? Judging from the patents and investments, the firm might have sorted out the technical side, but whether it really has a hot product on its hands is another thing entirely. Dandelion wants to play a role in home geothermal This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more

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Apple says iPhone XR is bestselling iPhone as it promotes RED model

first_img Apple announces (PRODUCT)RED iPhone 8 and 8 Plus models to help combat AIDS Citation: Apple says iPhone XR is ‘best-selling’ iPhone, as it promotes RED model to help fight AIDS (2018, November 30) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-apple-iphone-xr-best-selling-red.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (c)2018 USA TodayDistributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. The iPhone XR has been the “best-selling iPhone each and every day since it became available for sale” on Oct. 26, Apple vice president of product marketing Greg Joswiak said Wednesday. Explore further That means, when you compare the first month of sales, the $749 (on up) iPhone XR has outsold all other iPhones. That includes the pricier XS ($999 on up) and XS Max ($1,099) models that reached consumers a little more than a month earlier, as well as prior models still in the lineup, including the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus.That said, it’s only been about a month, so how sales hold up throughout the year remains to be seen. (Not that Apple is likely to break with its practice and reveal specific sales numbers.) By way of comparison, though, last year’s most expensive iPhone, the X model that was the first to crack $1,000, became the best-selling iPhone overall after its release.Joswiak spoke to USA TODAY ahead of World AIDS Day on Saturday, to promote the (PRODUCT)RED version of the iPhone XR, which was released at the same time as the XR models in other colors. This was the first time the RED version was available at the launch of a new iPhone and beforeWorld AIDS Day.While the phone is the same as other iPhone XR models—what’s inside and how much it costs—the red version is different because Apple donates a portion of sales to the Global Fund’s HIV/AIDS grants to provide testing, counseling, treatment and prevention programs, with a specific focus on eliminating transmission of the virus from mothers to their babies.From Dec. 1 to Dec. 7, Apple says it will donate $1 to the charity for every purchase—from an iPhone to a Lightning cable—that’s made with Apple Pay in an Apple Store, at apple.com or using the App Store app on your phone.Apple has been teaming with the RED charity for 12 years and has raised more than $200 million, Joswiak said, through the sale of RED products including a special Apple Watch sport band, cases for iPhones and iPads, and Beats headphones and speakers.last_img read more

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Fukushima current state of the cleanup

first_img Some workers have called for increased surveillance Explore further Eight years on, the disaster zone remains a huge building site with the immediate danger cleared but an immensely difficult clean-up job still looming.What is the state of the clean-up?The clean-up operation is progressing at a painstakingly slow pace.Robotic arms have recently been employed to successfully pick up pebble-sized pieces of radioactive fuel at the bottom of reactor two, one of three that melted down after the 2011 quake and tsunami.This is the first step to prepare the extremely delicate task of extracting the fuel that will not begin in earnest until 2021 at the earliest, the government and the TEPCO operator have said.Another problem is the fuel pools in reactors one, two and three.The pool in reactor one is covered in rubble which needs to be removed “with extreme care,” explained Akira Ono, head of the TEPCO subsidiary in charge of decommissioning.Removing fuel from the pools in reactors one and two will not start until 2023.As for reactor three, the operation to remove fuel should have started this month but it was delayed “due to various problems”, admitted Ono. What about contaminated water?Contaminated water still poses a huge problem for Fukushima operators. The water comes in three forms: residual water from the tsunami; water used to cool the reactors, and precipitation as well as groundwater. All water needs to be pumped, purified and stored.An ice wall stretching 1.5 kilometres and located 30 metres underground is designed to block underground water from nearby mountains from flowing into the shattered complex.The operators are winning the battle against contaminated water, Ono insisted, but non-profits like Greenpeace disagree.”It has gone down to 220 cubic metres on average per day in 2017/18 compared to 470 cubic metres four years ago,” he said.”We think we can get it down to 150 cubic metres by 2020.”However, inevitable typhoons and other periods of heavy rain make it an uphill battle. The clean-up continues Citation: Fukushima: current state of the clean-up (2019, March 8) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-fukushima-current-state-clean-up.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2019 AFP Shaun Burbie from Greenpeace said: “The government and TEPCO had set a target of 2020 as a timeframe for solving the water crisis…. That was never credible.”The reprocessing of all contaminated water will take five to six years, he estimated, and there are “remaining questions over its efficacy.””Volumes of contaminated water will continue to increase in the coming years.” The work is painstaking and likely to take several more years Eight years have passed since a tsunami smashed into the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan, sparking a meltdown and the worst atomic crisis since Chernobyl. Robot probes radioactive fuel at Japan’s Fukushima plant How is water decontaminated?Around 1.12 million cubic metres are stored onsite but the maximum of 1.37 million cubic metres will be reached at the end of 2020.The water is purified by a decontamination system that eliminates all radioactive elements with the exception of tritium.However, TEPCO realised last year that 85 percent of the water still contained too much potentially radioactive material and so decided to filter it a second time.Experts are still trying to work out what to do with this tritium-contaminated water.”There are several possible solutions (injecting it into deep pockets in the Earth, dumping it at sea, evaporating it) being examined by an expert working group but we have not yet decided anything,” said Yumiko Hata, head of Fukushima waste management at the industry ministry.As for solid radioactive waste, TEPCO plans to store 750,000 cubic metres of waste at the site until 2029—some of which is radioactive. What about the workers?The number of people working on the site has nearly halved from four years ago but there are still some 5,000 labourers.”A lot of the big jobs have been done (ice wall, protective coating on the ground, construction of various buildings),” said Ono.Workers are exposed to average levels of radiation below 5 millisieverts per year but TEPCO admits that this average masks a wide difference in individual levels depending on what jobs the workers carry out.One former worker, Minoru Ikeda, said surveillance should be strengthened.”We have a radiation book but only my employer looked at this. We are not especially monitored by the government and that’s not normal,” he complained.last_img read more

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Ethiopian airline defends its pilots training standards

first_imgIn this March 21, 2018, file photo a Thai Lion Air employee displays a ceremonial key to the company’s newest plane, Boeing’s first 737 MAX 9 jet, following a delivery ceremony to the airline in Seattle. The United States and many other countries have grounded the Max 8s and larger Max 9s as Boeing faces the challenge of proving the jets are safe to fly amid suspicions that faulty sensors and software contributed to the two crashes in less than five months. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) “If we are left alone, clearly we can’t move,” said Merciline Ndegwa, one of the relatives seeking compensation. “It’s been a difficult time reaching out to the airline and even Ethiopia’s government. So, as we move forward, it is our wish to have help from the government in that front.”Another, Erick Mwangi, spoke of what could be an “expensive and tedious” legal battle.Macharia Kamau, principal secretary of Kenya’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, advised the families to “come together as a group” as the country’s attorney general takes up the matter.The government will assist in obtaining death certificates for the victims, he said. CEO Tewolde Gebremariam said that the airline’s pilots completed the training meant to help them shift from an older model to the newer 737 Max 8.He said in a statement the pilots were also made aware of an emergency directive issued by the U.S. regulator, the FAA, following the crash of a Boeing 737 Max 8 owned by Indonesia’s Lion Air in October.As investigators look into the crashes, attention has turned to a new software in the jets that can push their nose down in some circumstances, for example when the sensors suggest the plane may be stalling.The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has said satellite-based tracking data showed that the movements of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 were similar to those of Lion Air Flight 610, which killed 189 people.The New York Times reported that the pilots of the Ethiopian plane never trained in a simulator for the plane. Gebremariam said that the 737 Max simulator is not designed to simulate problems in the new jet software. He declined, however, to say whether the pilots had trained on the simulator. Ethiopian Airlines said Thursday that its pilots went through all the extra training required by Boeing and the U.S. aviation regulators to fly the 737 Max 8 jet that crashed this month, killing all 157 people on board. Officials have delivered bags of scorched earth from the crash site to family members of the victims because of the problems with identifying the remains.Thirty-two Kenyans were among the 157 victims of the plane crash. No nation lost more. Citation: Ethiopian airline defends its pilots’ training standards (2019, March 21) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-ethiopian-airline-defends-standards.html Paris investigators start studying Ethiopian jet’s recorder The Ethiopian Airlines jetliner, on a regularly scheduled flight from Ethiopia to neighboring Kenya, carried people from 35 countries when it crashed on March 10 shortly after takeoff from the capital Addis Ababa.The Boeing Max planes have since been grounded around the world as authorities try to identify the problem and Boeing issues an update to its aviation software.Meanwhile, the families of Kenyan victims of the Ethiopian plane crash are asking their government for legal assistance in pursuing compensation.In an emotional gathering Thursday in the Kenyan capital of Nairobi, the victims’ relatives asked for lawyers to help them pursue their case.center_img In this March 14, 2019, file photo a worker walks next to a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane parked at Boeing Field in Seattle. U.S. prosecutors are looking into the development of Boeing’s 737 Max jets, a person briefed on the matter revealed Monday, the same day French aviation investigators concluded there were “clear similarities” in the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Max 8 last week and a Lion Air jet in October. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File) Explore further In this Monday, March 11, 2019 file photo, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for TUI Group sits parked in the background at right at Boeing Co.’s Renton Assembly Plant in Renton, Wash. The Transportation Department confirmed that its watchdog agency will examine how the FAA certified the Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, the now-grounded plane involved in two fatal accidents within five months. The FAA had stood by the safety of the plane up until last Wednesday, March 13, 2019 despite other countries grounding it. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File) © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. In this March 13, 2019, file photo people work in the flight deck of a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for TUI Group parked next to another MAX 8 also designated for TUI at Boeing Co.’s Renton Assembly Plant in Renton, Wash. U.S. prosecutors are looking into the development of Boeing’s 737 Max jets, a person briefed on the matter revealed Monday, the same day French aviation investigators concluded there were “clear similarities” in the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Max 8 last week and a Lion Air jet in October. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Artificial intelligenceenhanced journalism offers a glimpse of the future of the knowledge

first_img A common question as these intelligent technologies infiltrate various industries is how work and labor will be affected. In this case, who—or what—will do journalism in this AI-enhanced and automated world, and how will they do it?The evidence I’ve assembled in my new book “Automating the New: How Algorithms are Rewriting the Media” suggests that the future of AI-enabled journalism will still have plenty of people around. However, the jobs, roles and tasks of those people will evolve and look a bit different. Human work will be hybridized—blended together with algorithms—to suit AI’s capabilities and accommodate its limitations.Augmenting, not substitutingSome estimates suggest that current levels of AI technology could automate only about 15% of a reporter’s job and 9% of an editor’s job. Humans still have an edge over non-Hollywood AI in several key areas that are essential to journalism, including complex communication, expert thinking, adaptability and creativity.Reporting, listening, responding and pushing back, negotiating with sources, and then having the creativity to put it together—AI can do none of these indispensable journalistic tasks. It can often augment human work, though, to help people work faster or with improved quality. And it can create new opportunities for deepening news coverage and making it more personalized for an individual reader or viewer.Newsroom work has always adapted to waves of new technology, including photography, telephones, computers—or even just the copy machine. Journalists will adapt to work with AI, too. As a technology, it is already and will continue to change newswork, often complementing but rarely substituting for a trained journalist. New workI’ve found that more often than not, AI technologies appear to actually be creating new types of work in journalism.Take for instance the Associated Press, which in 2017 introduced the use of computer vision AI techniques to label the thousands of news photos it handles every day. The system can tag photos with information about what or who is in an image, its photographic style, and whether an image is depicting graphic violence. The system gives photo editors more time to think about what they should publish and frees them from spending lots of time just labeling what they have. But developing it took a ton of work, both editorial and technical: Editors had to figure out what to tag and whether the algorithms were up to the task, then develop new test data sets to evaluate performance. When all that was done, they still had to supervise the system, manually approving the suggested tags for each image to ensure high accuracy. Citation: Artificial intelligence-enhanced journalism offers a glimpse of the future of the knowledge economy (2019, June 11) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-artificial-intelligence-enhanced-journalism-glimpse-future.html This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. Robots won’t hold the pens just yet, but they can help people do the work. Credit: Paul Fleet/Shutterstock.com The Arria Studio user interface showing the composition of a personalized story about gun violence. Credit: Nicholas Diakopoulos screenshot of Arria Studio, CC BY-ND Stuart Myles, the AP executive who oversees the project, told me it took about 36 person-months of work, spread over a couple of years and more than a dozen editorial, technical and administrative staff. About a third of the work, he told me, involved journalistic expertise and judgment that is especially hard to automate. While some of the human supervision may be reduced in the future, he thinks that people will still need to do ongoing editorial work as the system evolves and expands. Semi-automated content productionIn the United Kingdom, the RADAR project semi-automatically pumps out around 8,000 localized news articles per month. The system relies on a stable of six journalists who find government data sets tabulated by geographic area, identify interesting and newsworthy angles, and then develop those ideas into data-driven templates. The templates encode how to automatically tailor bits of the text to the geographic locations identified in the data. For instance, a story could talk about aging populations across Britain, and show readers in Luton how their community is changing, with different localized statistics for Bristol. The stories then go out by wire service to local media who choose which to publish. The approach marries journalists and automation into an effective and productive process. The journalists use their expertise and communication skills to lay out options for storylines the data might follow. They also talk to sources to gather national context, and write the template. The automation then acts as a production assistant, adapting the text for different locations.RADAR journalists use a tool called Arria Studio, which offers a glimpse of what writing automated content looks like in practice. It’s really just a more complex interface for word processing. The author writes fragments of text controlled by data-driven if-then-else rules. For instance, in an earthquake report you might want a different adjective to talk about a quake that is magnitude 8 than one that is magnitude 3. So you’d have a rule like, IF magnitude > 7 THEN text = “strong earthquake,” ELSE IF magnitude < 4 THEN text = "minor earthquake." Tools like Arria also contain linguistic functionality to automatically conjugate verbs or decline nouns, making it easier to work with bits of text that need to change based on data.Authoring interfaces like Arria allow people to do what they're good at: logically structuring compelling storylines and crafting creative, nonrepetitive text. But they also require some new ways of thinking about writing. For instance, template writers need to approach a story with an understanding of what the available data could say—to imagine how the data could give rise to different angles and stories, and delineate the logic to drive those variations.Supervision, management or what journalists might call "editing" of automated content systems are also increasingly occupying people in the newsroom. Maintaining quality and accuracy is of the utmost concern in journalism. RADAR has developed a three-stage quality assurance process. First, a journalist will read a sample of all of the articles produced. Then another journalist traces claims in the story back to their original data source. As a third check, an editor will go through the logic of the template to try to spot any errors or omissions. It's almost like the work a team of software engineers might do in debugging a script—and it's all work humans must do, to ensure the automation is doing its job accurately.Developing human resourcesInitiatives like those at the Associated Press and at RADAR demonstrate that AI and automation are far from destroying jobs in journalism. They're creating new work—as well as changing existing jobs. The journalists of tomorrow will need to be trained to design, update, tweak, validate, correct, supervise and generally maintain these systems. Many may need skills for working with data and formal logical thinking to act on that data. Fluency with the basics of computer programming wouldn't hurt either.As these new jobs evolve, it will be important to ensure they're good jobs—that people don't just become cogs in a much larger machine process. Managers and designers of this new hybrid labor will need to consider the human concerns of autonomy, effectiveness and usability. But I'm optimistic that focusing on the human experience in these systems will allow journalists to flourish, and society to reap the rewards of speed, breadth of coverage and increased quality that AI and automation can offer.center_img Critical, contextualised journalism needed in the face of AI-produced copy Explore further Much as robots have transformed entire swaths of the manufacturing economy, artificial intelligence and automation are now changing information work, letting humans offload cognitive labor to computers. In journalism, for instance, data mining systems alert reporters to potential news stories, while newsbots offer new ways for audiences to explore information. Automated writing systems generate financial, sports and elections coverage. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Provided by The Conversationlast_img read more

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Juno Finds Mysterious Unexpected Currents Crackling Through Jupiters Magnetosphere

first_img 5 Mars Myths and Misconceptions Science Fact or Fantasy? 20 Imaginary Worlds There are turbulent, unexpected currents crackling through Jupiter’s atmosphere, producing brilliant auroras. Juno, the NASA probe that has orbited the gas giant since 2016, passes over Jupiter’s polar regions ever 53.5 days, collecting data on the magnetic forces that produce ultrabright auroras above the huge planet. In a new paper, published July 8 in the journal Nature Astronomy, researchers working with Juno’s data discovered that the electric currents passing through Jupiter’s magnetosphere — the region of its atmosphere richest with magnetic field lines — don’t act as expected. The probe found less direct current — current that constantly flows in one direction — than physicists predicted. It was only about 50 million amperes, an incredibly powerful current, but not as high as theoretical models of Jupiter’s magnetosphere suggested would be present. That finding suggests that “alternating current” — current that flickers back and forth — plays a much bigger role in producing Jupiter’s auroras than anyone realized, the researchers wrote. On Jupiter, as on Earth, auroras are a product of whirling currents in magnetic fields interacting with high-energy particles from the sun. [10 Places in the Solar System We’d Most Like to Visit]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65951-jupiter-currents-magnetosphere-tesla.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  “These observations, combined with other Juno spacecraft measurements, show that alternating currents play a much greater role in generating Jupiter’s aurora than the direct current system,” Joachim Saur, an author of the paper, said in a statement. On Earth, we typically think of alternating and direct currents (AC and DC) in terms of electronics. Famously, in the late 19th century, inventors Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla disagreed sharply over which method should be used to deliver power to electrical devices. DC power doesn’t convert as easily between different voltages, according to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), so Tesla wanted to turn the more-easily convertible AC into the standard. Edison, guarding his DC-dependant patents, resisted the change and spread misinformation that AC was more dangerous, according to the DOE. Tesla won out in the end, and AC became the standard for U.S. power plants. However, according to the DOE, direct current has regained favor as more battery-powered devices have come to market. Your lights are probably running on AC power, but there’s a good chance the device you’re reading this on relies on DC. (That’s why your laptop requires an AC adapter.) In the space around Jupiter, the proportion of AC to DC isn’t determined by feuding pre-modern inventors, but by the behavior of ions in the planet’s atmosphere. Jupiter has powerful currents than Earth for several reasons, including its huge size, its fast rate of spin and the excess of charged particles (ions) pumped out from volcanoes on the moon Io. That such a large proportion of those currents are AC seems to be a result of turbulence in the planet’s magnetic fields, the researchers wrote. Turbulence in this sense refers to the disordered way in which the magnetic fields’ shape and directionality fluctuates. And that turbulence is producing different effects at each of Jupiter’s two poles. In the time Juno has orbited Jupiter, the planet’s north pole has experienced about half the current of the south pole, the researchers wrote. That seems to be a result of the much more complex arrangement of magnetic field lines in the north, which interrupts the flow of currents. In the south, they wrote, the magnetic field lines are “smoother.” The effects of those differences are visible in the two poles’ auroras, they noted. In the north, the auroras tend to be more widely dispersed, with a structure of “filaments and flares.” In the south, the auroras tend to be more structured, with a “bright arc” extending out from the main oval where auroras occur. This research on Jupiter’s powerful magnetic fields, the researchers wrote, could inform their understanding of Earth’s weaker magnetic field — humanity’s main protection against harsh solar particles. Some researchers already suspected turbulence produced a significant proportion of currents around our planet. This work seems to lend credence to that idea. The 18 Biggest Unsolved Mysteries in Physics Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoBeverly Hills MDPlastic Surgeon Reveals: “You Can Fill In Wrinkles At Home” (Here’s How)Beverly Hills MDUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryMeal Kit Wars: 10 Tested & Ranked. See Who WonTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryUndoairdogusa.comThe World’s Best Washable Air Purifierairdogusa.comUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndolast_img read more

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TN targets defence aerospace investments of 10 billionTN targets defence aerospace investments

first_imgTamil Nadu Published on aerospace (industry) TN’s proposed electric vehicle policy to empower auto segment Announces aerospace, defence industrial policy offering incentives, support COMMENT SHARE defence equipment Tamil Nadu is keen to replicate its success in building a strong automotive base with the defence and aerospace sector. It has set an ambitious target of attracting investments worth $10 billion in ten years generating direct and indirect employment opportunities for one lakh people.The State government has announced a slew of incentives, including subsidy for allotment of land, capital subsidy for individual units and for development of aerospace and defence industrial parks to make the State a preferred destination for investments.The ambitious target and incentives were unveiled in the Tamil Nadu Aerospace and Defence Industrial Policy 2019 released at the second edition of Tamil Nadu Global Investors Meeting 2019 (GIM). Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman released the policy with Tamil Nadu Chief Minister Edappadi K Palaniswami receiving the first copy.To attract global OEMs, tier-I suppliers and Indian majors to set up their units in Tamil Nadu, there will be flexibility in employment conditions including hiring of contract labour and working hours for women; 24X7 operations (three shifts), employment of women in night shifts.Special incentivesThe policy also states that new/existing manufacturing units with projects under the offset obligations requirement of the Defence Ministry will be offered special package of incentives. Concession will be given up to 30 per cent of land cost and 100 per cent reimbursement from stamp duty on land leased or purchased in the industrial parks/aerospace and defence parks promoted by State-run industry promotion agencies Sipcot/Tidco.Further, both the industries will be given 100 per cent exemption on electricity tax on power purchased from public sector utility, Tangedco.On capital subsidy for units, the policy says a new venture or expansion of existing aerospace and defence MSME industrial units with investment up to ₹10 crore will be given a back-ended capital subsidy at 10 per cent on its eligible fixed assets in ten equal installments over five years.An infrastructure back-ended subsidy at 10 per cent of the eligible fixed assets with a ceiling of ₹10 crore for the development of aerospace and defence industrial parks will be given to developers, provided the project has a minimum of 50 acres. Development of MRO complex is also eligible for the subsidy, the policy said.In her remarks, Sitharaman said the Defence corridor in Tamil Nadu is a vision of the Prime Minister Narendra Modi to make sure that defence production is not just for Indian consumers (Indian Armed Forces), but also for exports. Chief Minister Palaniswami, in his opening remarks said that the second edition of GIM targets an investment of ₹2 lakh crores, “which I am happy to say has already been exceeded.”“I would like to share with you that our Government has approved an investment proposal by Foxconn to assemble premium brand smart phones at Sriperumbudur,” said Palaniswami. At the inauguration, Japanese Ambassador to India Kenji Hiramatsu announced that All Nippon Airways will expand its operations in India by launching a direct flight from Chennai to Narita airport from October. Industry leaders, including Venu Srinivasan of TVS Motors, Karan Adani of the Adani Group spoke on the State’s strengths in various sectors, including education.center_img January 23, 2019 This year, Hyundai to unveil ‘world’s best’ electric car (from left) Nirmala Sitharaman, Defence Minister; Michael Brielmaier, President and MD, Ford India; Edappadi K Palaniswami, Tamil Nadu CM; O Panneerselvam, Deputy CM; MC Sampath, TN Industries Minister; K Gnanadesikan, TN Industries Secretary; Venu Srinivasan, Chairman, TVS Motor Co; Karan Adani, CEO of Adani Ports; and MM Murugappan, Executive Chairman, Murugappa Group at the inaugural session of the TN Global Investors Meet 2019, in Chennai on Wednesday   –  Bijoy Ghosh Global Investors Meet 2019 SHARE SHARE EMAIL RELATED COMMENTSlast_img read more

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Panel urges President to look into Andhra Pradeshs status

first_imgThe Prathyeka Hodha Vibhajana Hameela Sadhana Samithi has submitted a memorandum to the President, urging that assurances and promises made to the State of the Andhra Pradesh before the bifurcation be fulfilled within a specific span of time.The Samithi is a joint action committee to achieve special category status and promises made in the Bifurcation Act.‘State without capital’In its memorandum, the Samithi pointed out that the AP Re-Organisation Act, 2014, contains 14 assurances in the main Sections and 19 institutions and projects were mentioned in the Schedule XIII.“The Hon’ble President is aware that the State was left without a capital on account of bifurcation. There is, therefore, urgent need to create infrastructure in the new capital and we seek your intervention in extending assistance liberally as provided under Section 94 (3) of the AP Reorganisation Act, 2014,” it said.“The urgency is compounded by the fact that the State government relocated the administration by shifting all the offices from Hyderabad to Vijayawada to bring administration closer to people and officials & public are put to inconvenience on account of inadequate infrastructure. It is requested to make substantial allocations for capital construction, as a statutory duty is cast upon the GoI in this regard,” it added. The Samithi said if the assurances and promises are fulfilled in a specific span of time, there will be a scope for the residuary State of Andhra Pradesh to recover from the huge losses it suffered due to the bifurcation.“Since the division is forced on the State, it is the duty of the Government of India to regularly review all the above issues for expeditious resolution. In the circumstances, the above issues are brought to the kind notice of the Hon’ble President for his intervention and resolution of the pending issues for which act of the Hon’ble President, we are all grateful ,” the memorandum added. SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENT politics state politics COMMENTS Published oncenter_img February 12, 2019 SHARE Wants promises made during bifurcation to be fulfilled in a time-bound manner Andhra Pradesh Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N Chandrababu Naidu, accompanied by a delegation, addresses the media after submitting a memorandum to President Ram Nath Kovind regarding the special status to the state of Andhra Pradesh New Delhi, Tuesday, Feb 12, 2019.   –  PTIlast_img read more

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Simply perfect England end 27year final wait

first_img Related News Related News Cricket 10 Jul 2019 Morgan’s England ‘a different animal’, says Plunkett Cricket 11 Jul 2019 Rampant England end Australia’s title defence to roar into final {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}center_img From the outset, England’s pace attack of Chris Woakes and Jofra Archer delivered exactly what their captain Eoin Morgan would have wanted from them — removing skipper Aaron Finch, David Warner and Peter Handscomb to reduce the Australians to 14-3 inside 37 balls.They were quick and accurate and extracted the maximum possible movement out of the morning surface and although Steve Smith and Alex Carey were able to rebuild, Australia never truly recovered from that opening blitz.”Today was close to a perfect performance, right from the two bowlers up front,” Morgan said.”Chris Woakes and Jofra Archer bowled a hell of a spell. They put pressure on with early wickets and allowed us to stay on the front foot.”SENSIBLE STARTThen, chasing a lower than expected target of 224 to win, England’s opening batsmen Jason Roy and Jonny Bairstow did exactly what was needed in such a situation — they batted aggressively but sensibly to reach 50 without loss at the 10-over mark.By the time Australia broke through, with Bairstow trapped lbw by Mitchell Starc, England were over half-way to their target with nearly 32 overs remaining.”The first three or four overs was very intelligent batting. They absorbed a bit of pressure, saw that swing was going to be a little bit of a threat and the way they waited until the bowlers came into their areas to hurt them was very smart,” said Joe Root, who saw England through to victory with a brisk unbeaten 49 from 46 balls.”Once we got off to a start we were able to put more pressure on them and then felt always ahead in the game,” he said.Roy’s sublime strokeplay for his 85 and Woakes’s 3-20 were the two outstanding individual contributions but Adil Rashid’s leg spin delivered three wickets, including the stubborn Carey to break a 103-run partnership with Steve Smith.To a man, England delivered when it mattered and the transformation of this team, after the debacle of four years ago has been astonishing.England didn’t get out of the group in Australia and New Zealand – they won only two of their six games and were beaten by Bangladesh.”It’s been a process for the last four years. In 2015 we were way off the mark, we struggled against the top teams, and the teams that sat below that,” said Morgan.”So there was quite a drastic change in the way we played and the way we looked at playing our 50-over cricket.”Not half.Now comes the chance to be the first England team to win the World Cup and as the chants of “Cricket’s coming home” rang out, there was little doubt the public believe Morgan’s team can deliver.Morgan, though, is keeping his feet on the ground, aware that New Zealand showed their quality with the impressive semi-final win over India at Old Trafford on Wednesday.”I think New Zealand throughout the whole tournament has been probably the hardest side to beat and the best side in the group stages,” said Morgan.”I think their performance in the semi-final was probably their best. They will be a difficult side to beat on Sunday, so we are looking forward to it.” (Reporting by Simon Evans, editing by Ed Osmond) Cricket 08 Jul 2019 New Zealand can beat India with an explosive start, says Vettori BIRMINGHAM, England (Reuters) – Cricket can be a game of some complexity and nuance but as England showed in their dismantling of Australia in Thursday’s World Cup semi-final, it can also be a remarkably straightforward sport.Put simply, if your frontline pace bowlers are bang on the money and your opening batsmen are absolutely on fire, you aren’t going to lose many games in the one-day format.Such simplicity is a little ironic given how much England have agonised over their World Cup record — they have not reached the final since 1992 and indeed had not won a knockout round match in the intervening 27 years.In contrast, Australia have won four of the last five tournaments but there was no sign at all of those sharply contrasting pedigrees once play began at Edgbaston.last_img read more

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Ukrainian fighter found guilty over killing of Italian photographer

first_imgMarkiv holds joint Ukrainian-Italian citizenship and was arrested after he flew back to Italy in 2017 to see his mother.He has denied the charges. “Glory to Ukraine,” he shouted after the verdict was read out. Under Italian law, a defendant has the right to two appeals before a sentence becomes definitive.Ukrainian Interior Affairs Minister Arsen Avakov said the verdict was unfair and would be appealed.”Our guardsman and Ukraine are not guilty of the death of Rocchelli. He has become the victim of an aggressive Russia which unleashed in Sloviansk a war on Donbass (region). We will continue fighting”, Avakov posted on his Facebook.The office of Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelenskiy said in a statement he had asked the Foreign Ministry and the General Prosecutor’s Office “to make every effort” to bring Markiv home.Rocchelli was a freelance photographer who worked with the Cesura photographers’ collective. (Reporting by Emilio Parodi; additional reporting in Kiev by Natalia Zinets; Editing by Crispian Balmer and Andrew Cawthorne) Related News MILAN (Reuters) – An Italian court sentenced a Ukrainian man to 24 years in jail on Friday over his role in the 2014 killing of an Italian photographer covering fighting between pro-Russian forces and Ukrainian troops.Journalist Andrea Rocchelli and his Russian colleague Andrey Mironov were killed after they were hit by mortar fire near the town of Slaviansk in eastern Ukraine five years ago.Italian prosecutors in the northern city of Pavia said Vitaliy Markiv, a volunteer fighter with the Ukrainian forces at the time, had taken part in the deadly attack and accused him of being an accessory to murder.The prosecution had requested a 17-year sentence for Markiv but the judge ignored this and imposed a much tougher term. World 10 Jul 2019 Party of Ukraine’s new president leads parliamentary vote race Related Newscenter_img World 09 Jul 2019 Top EU officials visit Kiev, pledge more aid for war-torn east Ukraine Nation 11 Jul 2019 Dr Wee discusses politics, global issues with former Ukrainian minister {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}last_img read more

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22 policemen injured in Jharkhand road accident

first_img22 policemen injured in Jharkhand road accidentFifty-two Jharkhand Armed Police (JAP) personnel were on their way to Deoghar for the Shravani Mela duty from Ranchi when the bus driver lost control.advertisement Indo Asian News Service RanchiJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 18:20 IST (Image for representation)As many as 22 policemen were injured in a road accident in Jharkhand’s Ramgarh district on Saturday, the police said.Fifty-two Jharkhand Armed Police (JAP) personnel were on their way to Deoghar for the Shravani Mela duty from Ranchi when the bus driver lost control and hit a tree in the Sikidari valley.The condition of five of the injured constables is stated to be critical.Also Read | Need for speed on Yamuna Expressway remains uncontrolled despite deadly accidentsAlso Read | 10 killed, 35 injured after trains collide in PakistanAlso Watch | 7 dead, several injured after 11 coaches of Seemanchal Express derail in BiharFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byShifa Naseer Tags :Follow Road accidentFollow Jharkhand Nextlast_img read more

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