Farmers Table event in NE Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Fresh, local, summer ingredients from northeast Ohio will be the inspiration for a unique farm to table culinary experience this August that celebrates Ohio farms and flavors.The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA) is partnering with Maplestar Farm and The Driftwood Group for The Farmers’ Table on Sunday, August 30 at 4 p.m. The event will take place in western Geauga County at Maplestar Farm in Auburn Township.Guests will take a guided tour of Maplestar Farm’s organic fields, sample carefully crafted hors d’oeuvres, and enjoy beer, wine, and tea before sitting down to an exciting four course meal prepared by Erik Martinez, Executive Chef at Cibréo Italian Kitchen, featuring wine pairings.The event will also feature special guest Alan Guebert, award-winning syndicated agricultural journalist and OEFFA 2015 conference keynote speaker, who will offer a hearty toast to local food. Following the dinner, he’ll be signing his new book, The Land of Milk and Uncle Honey, and sharing stories. The book was recently included on Bon Appetit Magazine‘s 20 Food Books to Read This Summer, LA Magazine‘s Top 10 Summer Books for Foodies, and Food Tank’s Summer Reading List.Tickets are $125 per person or $1,000 for a table of 8. All proceeds support OEFFA’s work to grow Ohio’s sustainable and organic agriculture movement.For more information or to purchase tickets, go to www.oeffa.org/FarmersTable, call (614) 421-Ext. 206, or email dinner@oeffa.org.last_img read more

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21 hours agoLiverpool make January transfer window call

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Liverpool make January transfer window callby Paul Vegas21 hours agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool expect to have a quiet January transfer window.The Reds have enjoyed a flying start to the new Premier League season, currently sitting six points clear of Manchester City having won eight of their nine matches so far.Liverpool are also on course to make the knockout stages of the Champions League having breezed past Genk with a 4-1 win on Wednesday night.With Jurgen Klopp’s side flying high, the Liverpool Echo says it’s unlikely the Merseyside giants will splash the cash when the transfer window reopens in the New Year.It’s claimed that it will take a ‘huge unforeseen struggle’ for Klopp to delve into the market. last_img read more

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Telecom Italias wholesale TV deal with Sky is due

first_imgTelecom Italia’s wholesale TV deal with Sky is due to go live in April, allowing Telecom Italia customers to gain access the full Sky television offer through its high-speed broadband network.Speaking on Telecom Italia’s fourth quarter earnings call, company CEO Marco Patuano said that Sky will provide a set-top box for the internet TV offering and that the non-exclusive deal means “we will have the same content that Sky will have.”The deal, which was first announced in April 2014, will see the companies co-operate on a revenue sharing basis, with the agreement allowing Sky to reach potential pay TV subscribers who are unable to install a satellite dish.Speaking more broadly about the pay TV opportunity in Italy, Patuano said that this market was still “under-penetrated” with just 25% of homes subscribing to pay TV, compared to between 50% and 60% in the UK and France.He said there was opportunity to target broadband subscribers with “some form of premium content television or premium content entertainment.”However, Patuano added that “we have no space for making huge discounts, in order to move customers to convergence, even if the effect on the churn rate is positive.”last_img read more

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New study supports use of ZnO nanoparticles in sunscreens

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 4 2018Zinc oxide (ZnO) has long been recognized as an effective sunscreen agent. However, there have been calls for sunscreens containing ZnO nanoparticles to be banned because of potential toxicity and the need for caution in the absence of safety data in humans. An important new study provides the first direct evidence that intact ZnO nanoparticles neither penetrate the human skin barrier nor cause cellular toxicity after repeated application to human volunteers under in-use conditions. This confirms that the known benefits of using ZnO nanoparticles in sunscreens clearly outweigh the perceived risks, reports the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.The safety of nanoparticles used in sunscreens has been a highly controversial international issue in recent years, as previous animal exposure studies found much higher skin absorption of zinc from application of ZnO sunscreens to the skin than in human studies. Some public advocacy groups have voiced concern that penetration of the upper layer of the skin by sunscreens containing ZnO nanoparticles could gain access to the living cells in the viable epidermis with toxic consequences, including DNA damage. A potential danger, therefore, is that this concern may also result in an undesirable downturn in sunscreen use. A 2017 National Sun Protection Survey by the Cancer Council Australia found only 55 percent of Australians believed it was safe to use sunscreen every day, down from 61 per cent in 2014.Investigators in Australia studied the safety of repeated application of agglomerated ZnO nanoparticles applied to five human volunteers (aged 20 to 30 years) over five days. This mimics normal product use by consumers. They applied ZnO nanoparticles suspended in a commercial sunscreen base to the skin of volunteers hourly for six hours and daily for five days. Using multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, they showed that the nanoparticles remained within the superficial layers of the stratum corneum and in the skin furrows. The fate of ZnO nanoparticles was also characterized in excised human skin in vitro. They did not penetrate the viable epidermis and no cellular toxicity was seen, even after repeated hourly or daily applications typically used for sunscreens.Related StoriesCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedMany thyroid cancer patients have no choice about radioactive iodine, study revealsStudy shows connection between poor sleep and poor nutrition”The terrible consequences of skin cancer and photoaging are much greater than any toxicity risk posed by approved sunscreens,” stated lead investigator Michael S. Roberts, PhD, of the Therapeutics Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, and School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Sansom Institute, Adelaide, QLD, Australia.”This study has shown that sunscreens containing nano ZnO can be repeatedly applied to the skin with minimal risk of any toxicity. We hope that these findings will help improve consumer confidence in these products, and in turn lead to better sun protection and reduction in ultraviolet-induced skin aging and cancer cases,” he concluded.”This study reinforces the important public health message that the known benefits of using ZnO nano sunscreens clearly outweigh the perceived risks of using nano-sunscreens that are not supported by the scientific evidence,” commented Paul F.A. Wright, PhD, School of Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC, Australia, in an accompanying editorial. “Of great significance is the investigators’ finding that the slight increase in zinc ion concentrations in viable epidermis was not associated with cellular toxicity under conditions of realistic ZnO nano sunscreen use.Source: https://www.elsevier.com/last_img read more

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New hope for treating devastating brain cancer in children

first_img Source:https://www.rockefeller.edu/news/25535-new-hope-treating-childhood-brain-cancer/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 5 2019There could be new treatments on the horizon for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, or DIPG, a devastating form of brain cancer that afflicts young children and is currently incurable. Recent experiments in animal models of the disease have identified an experimental drug that effectively destroys DIPG cells. And a team of Rockefeller scientists just figured out how this promising compound works.The research, described in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that the drug acts on cellular cholesterol pathways, and suggests that these pathways may be fruitful targets for treating a variety of brain cancers.Targeting tumorsDIPG tumors are located in the pons, a highly sensitive structure that connects the brain to the spinal cord. Surgical removal of tumors is effectively impossible since it poses the risk of fatal brain damage. And although radiation can be used to temporarily reduce symptoms, the cancer inevitably grows, with an average survival rate of less than one year. Which is to say: there is a pressing need for new ways to treat children with the disease.An auspicious development came in 2014 from a collaboration between the labs of C. David Allis, the Joy and Jack Fishman Professor, and Viviane Tabar, Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). The team showed that a compound known as MI-2 stops tumor growth in a mouse model of DIPG. The drug was already on scientists’ radar for the treatment of leukemia, and was known to work on leukemia cells by interacting with menin, a protein that regulates gene expression. So when Allis’ team began investigating the effect of MI-2 on DIPG cells, they initially suspected that it would work in a similar manner.”Our first hypothesis was that the drug switched off genes by interacting with menin,” says Richard Phillips, a neuro-oncologist at MSKCC and a visiting fellow in the Allis lab who spearheaded this effort. “But as we probed a little bit further, many of the things that we would expect to see didn’t pan out.”Related StoriesResearchers report how a popular antidepressant drug could rewire the brainHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerFor example, when the researchers genetically removed menin from glioma cells, those cells remained sensitive to MI-2, indicating that the compound exerted its effects via a pathway distinct from that observed in leukemia. The scientists then discovered that DIPG cells exposed to MI-2 failed to maintain healthy levels of cholesterol, and quickly died; but the cells could be rescued with a dose of supplemental cholesterol–suggesting that, in the case of glioma, MI-2 works by depleting the nutrient. Eventually, the researchers discovered that MI-2 directly inhibits lanosterol synthase, an enzyme involved in cholesterol production.The researchers also found that, while MI-2 destroys glioma cells, the drug doesn’t damage normal brain cells. This finding is consistent with other research showing that some cancer cells are particularly vulnerable to cholesterol disturbances.Building better drugsThis study contributes to a growing body of research pointing to cholesterol interference as a promising new way to treat cancer. Moving forward, Phillips and his colleagues hope to develop compounds that are optimized for targeting brain cancer. As a starting point, they are studying a number of cholesterol-reducing compounds that are already on the market.”Some existing drugs, initially made for people with high cholesterol, were designed to target lanosterol synthase–but they were never really thought of as cancer drugs,” he says. “One of them is even more potent than MI-2, so we’re now working with a team of chemical biologists to see if we can modify the drug so that it reaches the brain.”More broadly, this research highlights the importance of knowing not just that a drug works, but how it works. In this case, the discovery that MI-2 acts on lanosterol synthase revealed that DIPG tumors are sensitive to cholesterol interference–a finding that opens avenues for the production of even more effective compounds.Says Phillips: “You can’t assume that what it says on the label is actually how a drug works.”last_img read more

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Researchers use brain scans to provide better understanding of unconscious bias

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 24 2019Unconscious bias has become a hot topic recently, with high profile incidents reported around the world. Researchers at Aalto University are exploring the causes of these biases in our neural wiring, and are developing techniques using MRI scanners that let us see the brain making assumptions in real time. The results show for the first time that the brain is not only unconsciously biased towards people based on appearance, but it also forms biases based on what we know about the person as well.Peoples’ brains are naturally biased towards other people who are the same as them – a behavioral trait scientists call ‘in-group favoritism’. The opposite trait is also true: people are often naturally biased against people who are not the same as them, called ‘out-group derogation’. Mamdooh Afdile – a filmmaker studying for a PhD in neuroscience at Aalto University – decided to use cinema to explore this.Afdile used the film Priest to create a 20-minute stimulus film version that explored biases in two social groupings: heterosexual and homosexual men. ‘If knowledge gained from our social environment can implicitly bias how we perceive each other, this should hold true to characters in movies as well,’ Afdile explained. To see if watching the movie biased the viewers subconsciously, Afdile flashed the face of the protagonist repeatedly for a brief duration of 40 milliseconds before and after showing the movie.Even though the viewer wouldn’t be able to notice being shown a person’s face – much less have time to recognize the person – their subconscious brain responded to the flashed face based on whether or not they had become biased. By using functional MRI, the researchers were able to detect how people’s biases could be changed.Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustRush University Medical Center offers new FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysmsIn the beginning of the movie, the viewer gets the impression that the priest is heterosexual and falling in love with a woman. At the 10 minute mark, the viewer finds out the priest is in fact in love with another man. The study groups watching the film consisted of 14 homosexual and 15 heterosexual men, and the team measured the bias felt by each group towards the priest character when they thought he was straight, and when they knew he was gay.The social groupings were chosen by the researchers because, unlike race or gender, we cannot perceive another person’s sexual orientation just by looking at their face – so any bias response by the participants in the experiment toward the face presented to them would be dependent on what they came to know about the person. The subconscious response to the face of the protagonist after seeing the movie, compared to before seeing it, was significantly different between the two groups, and this result was not symmetrical. The results from the heterosexual group showed a very mild negative bias response, and interestingly those from the homosexual group showed a very strong response in brain regions associated with in-group, such as empathy and favoritism.These results are interesting for our understanding of unconscious bias because they demonstrate that the brain responds in a biased way to traits it can’t detect using our basic senses.’This study shows the brain can be biased based on learned knowledge and not only by external factors,’ explains. Mamdooh Afdile. By combining movies with subliminal measurement we can now investigate the subconscious brain in ways that were extremely difficult before.’ Source:https://www.aalto.fi/news/brain-scans-on-movie-watchers-reveal-how-we-judge-peoplelast_img read more

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Selfheating drinks cans set for a relaunch—heres how they work

first_img Citation: Self-heating drinks cans set for a relaunch—here’s how they work (2018, June 20) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-self-heating-cans-relaunchhere.html These were essentially a stove and can rolled into one, with a tube of cordite (more typically used as the propellant in small arms ammunition) running through the centre of the can to act as fuel. The cans were quick and easy to use and could be lit with a cigarette, allowing troops to prepare a hot meat in under five minutes. Unfortunately, they also had a tendency to explode, showering the assembled squaddies with piping hot soup. Since then, there have been numerous attempts to make self-heating cans into a mainstream product. Most relied on a rather less explosive reaction to provide the heat, although some have still struggled with the problem of not blowing up. Quicklime (calcium oxide) heats up rapidly when mixed with water. But it’s not particularly efficient, producing about 60 calories of energy per gram of reactant (one calorie will heat up one millilitre of water by 1℃).The upshot is that, to heat the drink by 40℃, you need a heating element that takes up nearly half the packaging. That’s just about OK if you want a small drink on a warm day, but in the depths of winter, when you might really want a hot drink, you only end up with a tepid coffee. Credit: shutterstock Thermite – in slo-mo. Thermite is an extreme example of an exothermic reaction, a chemical reaction that produces energy in the form of light and heat. Fire, typically the result of a reacting carbon and oxygen, is probably the exothermic reaction we are most familiar with. But there are plenty more. In fact many of the very same troops who were landing on the Normandy beaches that day had another example in their ration packs, in the form of self-heating cans of soup. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Provided by The Conversation Self-heating cocoa. Credit: University of Cambridge The imposing cliffs of Pointe de Hoc overlook the Normandy beaches where Allied troops landed on June 6 1944. The assaults marked the beginning of the liberation of German occupied Europe. And the cliff tops were the perfect spot for artillery pieces capable of devastating any troops who tried to attack the Ohama and Utah beachheads.The Allied command knew this and so, to sure up the attack, the navy bombarded Pointe de Hoc. Afraid this might not be enough, they also had a backup plan. A team of US Rangers scaled the shear 30-metre cliffs and, after locating the weaponry, they deployed their grenades, destroying the guns. The key to their success was the choice of thermite-based charges. These weren’t the kind of “high explosives” normally found in grenades, but instead used a chemical reaction that produced temperatures hot enough to melt the steel of the artilleries’ firing mechanisms.Surprisingly, the thermite the rangers used is incredibly simple. It is just rust (iron oxide) and powdered aluminium. Mixed together they are entirely safe and stable – that is until the mixture is given an energetic kick, typically by lighting a magnesium metal fuse. And then the fireworks start. The aluminium grabs the oxygen from the rust and in the process produces iron and a huge about of heat. The reaction can easily reach 2,500℃, hot enough to produce molten (liquid) iron.The following video shows the reaction in slow motion. The bright light at the start is just the magnesium burning. Then, when the fuse burns down to the thermite, things get impressive, leaving a melted tube and a flaming puddle of iron. Explore further A US technology firm is hoping to make a very old idea finally work by launching self-heating drinks cans. HeatGenie recently received US$6m to bring their can design to market in 2018, more than 15 years after Nestle abandoned a similar idea. Yet the principles behind the technology go back much further to 1897, when Russian engineer Yevgeny Fedorov invented the first self-heating can. So how do these cans work, why no one has managed to make them a success, and what’s HeatGenie’s new approach? To answer that, we have to go back to World War II. More powerful cansWhat’s needed is a much more efficient reaction. Something, like thermite perhaps? As crazy as packing a can with a reaction capable of disabling an artillery gun may seem that’s just what HeatGenie is planning. Over the last ten years, the firm has filed numerous patents describing the use of thermite within self-heating cans. It turns out the reaction used by the US Rangers is still too hot to handle, so they’ve dialled things back a bit by replacing the rust with a less reactive but no less familiar material, silicon dioxide. So the latest generation of heated cans is fuelled on aluminium and ground-up glass.When this reaction is triggered it still kicks out a whopping 200 calories per gram of reactant and can achieve 1,600℃. Given the troubled history of self-heating packaging, releasing this much energy from the can in your hand might be a bit of a concern, so several of HeatGenie’s patents cover safety issues.These include a complex arrangement of “firewalls” that can block the so-called “flamefront” should things get too hot, and energy-absorbing “heatsinks” to ensure the heat is efficiently transmitted around the drink, as well as vents to let off any steam. With all that is place, the company claims just 10% of the packaging is taken up by the heating elements, which can still produce a warm coffee in two minutes (although the exact temperature hasn’t been revealed). So, well over a century on from Fedorov’s first efforts, has HeatGenie final cracked the self-heating can? Judging from the patents and investments, the firm might have sorted out the technical side, but whether it really has a hot product on its hands is another thing entirely. Dandelion wants to play a role in home geothermal This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more

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Apple says iPhone XR is bestselling iPhone as it promotes RED model

first_img Apple announces (PRODUCT)RED iPhone 8 and 8 Plus models to help combat AIDS Citation: Apple says iPhone XR is ‘best-selling’ iPhone, as it promotes RED model to help fight AIDS (2018, November 30) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-apple-iphone-xr-best-selling-red.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (c)2018 USA TodayDistributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. The iPhone XR has been the “best-selling iPhone each and every day since it became available for sale” on Oct. 26, Apple vice president of product marketing Greg Joswiak said Wednesday. Explore further That means, when you compare the first month of sales, the $749 (on up) iPhone XR has outsold all other iPhones. That includes the pricier XS ($999 on up) and XS Max ($1,099) models that reached consumers a little more than a month earlier, as well as prior models still in the lineup, including the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus.That said, it’s only been about a month, so how sales hold up throughout the year remains to be seen. (Not that Apple is likely to break with its practice and reveal specific sales numbers.) By way of comparison, though, last year’s most expensive iPhone, the X model that was the first to crack $1,000, became the best-selling iPhone overall after its release.Joswiak spoke to USA TODAY ahead of World AIDS Day on Saturday, to promote the (PRODUCT)RED version of the iPhone XR, which was released at the same time as the XR models in other colors. This was the first time the RED version was available at the launch of a new iPhone and beforeWorld AIDS Day.While the phone is the same as other iPhone XR models—what’s inside and how much it costs—the red version is different because Apple donates a portion of sales to the Global Fund’s HIV/AIDS grants to provide testing, counseling, treatment and prevention programs, with a specific focus on eliminating transmission of the virus from mothers to their babies.From Dec. 1 to Dec. 7, Apple says it will donate $1 to the charity for every purchase—from an iPhone to a Lightning cable—that’s made with Apple Pay in an Apple Store, at apple.com or using the App Store app on your phone.Apple has been teaming with the RED charity for 12 years and has raised more than $200 million, Joswiak said, through the sale of RED products including a special Apple Watch sport band, cases for iPhones and iPads, and Beats headphones and speakers.last_img read more

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Fukushima current state of the cleanup

first_img Some workers have called for increased surveillance Explore further Eight years on, the disaster zone remains a huge building site with the immediate danger cleared but an immensely difficult clean-up job still looming.What is the state of the clean-up?The clean-up operation is progressing at a painstakingly slow pace.Robotic arms have recently been employed to successfully pick up pebble-sized pieces of radioactive fuel at the bottom of reactor two, one of three that melted down after the 2011 quake and tsunami.This is the first step to prepare the extremely delicate task of extracting the fuel that will not begin in earnest until 2021 at the earliest, the government and the TEPCO operator have said.Another problem is the fuel pools in reactors one, two and three.The pool in reactor one is covered in rubble which needs to be removed “with extreme care,” explained Akira Ono, head of the TEPCO subsidiary in charge of decommissioning.Removing fuel from the pools in reactors one and two will not start until 2023.As for reactor three, the operation to remove fuel should have started this month but it was delayed “due to various problems”, admitted Ono. What about contaminated water?Contaminated water still poses a huge problem for Fukushima operators. The water comes in three forms: residual water from the tsunami; water used to cool the reactors, and precipitation as well as groundwater. All water needs to be pumped, purified and stored.An ice wall stretching 1.5 kilometres and located 30 metres underground is designed to block underground water from nearby mountains from flowing into the shattered complex.The operators are winning the battle against contaminated water, Ono insisted, but non-profits like Greenpeace disagree.”It has gone down to 220 cubic metres on average per day in 2017/18 compared to 470 cubic metres four years ago,” he said.”We think we can get it down to 150 cubic metres by 2020.”However, inevitable typhoons and other periods of heavy rain make it an uphill battle. The clean-up continues Citation: Fukushima: current state of the clean-up (2019, March 8) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-fukushima-current-state-clean-up.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2019 AFP Shaun Burbie from Greenpeace said: “The government and TEPCO had set a target of 2020 as a timeframe for solving the water crisis…. That was never credible.”The reprocessing of all contaminated water will take five to six years, he estimated, and there are “remaining questions over its efficacy.””Volumes of contaminated water will continue to increase in the coming years.” The work is painstaking and likely to take several more years Eight years have passed since a tsunami smashed into the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan, sparking a meltdown and the worst atomic crisis since Chernobyl. Robot probes radioactive fuel at Japan’s Fukushima plant How is water decontaminated?Around 1.12 million cubic metres are stored onsite but the maximum of 1.37 million cubic metres will be reached at the end of 2020.The water is purified by a decontamination system that eliminates all radioactive elements with the exception of tritium.However, TEPCO realised last year that 85 percent of the water still contained too much potentially radioactive material and so decided to filter it a second time.Experts are still trying to work out what to do with this tritium-contaminated water.”There are several possible solutions (injecting it into deep pockets in the Earth, dumping it at sea, evaporating it) being examined by an expert working group but we have not yet decided anything,” said Yumiko Hata, head of Fukushima waste management at the industry ministry.As for solid radioactive waste, TEPCO plans to store 750,000 cubic metres of waste at the site until 2029—some of which is radioactive. What about the workers?The number of people working on the site has nearly halved from four years ago but there are still some 5,000 labourers.”A lot of the big jobs have been done (ice wall, protective coating on the ground, construction of various buildings),” said Ono.Workers are exposed to average levels of radiation below 5 millisieverts per year but TEPCO admits that this average masks a wide difference in individual levels depending on what jobs the workers carry out.One former worker, Minoru Ikeda, said surveillance should be strengthened.”We have a radiation book but only my employer looked at this. We are not especially monitored by the government and that’s not normal,” he complained.last_img read more

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Ethiopian airline defends its pilots training standards

first_imgIn this March 21, 2018, file photo a Thai Lion Air employee displays a ceremonial key to the company’s newest plane, Boeing’s first 737 MAX 9 jet, following a delivery ceremony to the airline in Seattle. The United States and many other countries have grounded the Max 8s and larger Max 9s as Boeing faces the challenge of proving the jets are safe to fly amid suspicions that faulty sensors and software contributed to the two crashes in less than five months. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) “If we are left alone, clearly we can’t move,” said Merciline Ndegwa, one of the relatives seeking compensation. “It’s been a difficult time reaching out to the airline and even Ethiopia’s government. So, as we move forward, it is our wish to have help from the government in that front.”Another, Erick Mwangi, spoke of what could be an “expensive and tedious” legal battle.Macharia Kamau, principal secretary of Kenya’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, advised the families to “come together as a group” as the country’s attorney general takes up the matter.The government will assist in obtaining death certificates for the victims, he said. CEO Tewolde Gebremariam said that the airline’s pilots completed the training meant to help them shift from an older model to the newer 737 Max 8.He said in a statement the pilots were also made aware of an emergency directive issued by the U.S. regulator, the FAA, following the crash of a Boeing 737 Max 8 owned by Indonesia’s Lion Air in October.As investigators look into the crashes, attention has turned to a new software in the jets that can push their nose down in some circumstances, for example when the sensors suggest the plane may be stalling.The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has said satellite-based tracking data showed that the movements of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 were similar to those of Lion Air Flight 610, which killed 189 people.The New York Times reported that the pilots of the Ethiopian plane never trained in a simulator for the plane. Gebremariam said that the 737 Max simulator is not designed to simulate problems in the new jet software. He declined, however, to say whether the pilots had trained on the simulator. Ethiopian Airlines said Thursday that its pilots went through all the extra training required by Boeing and the U.S. aviation regulators to fly the 737 Max 8 jet that crashed this month, killing all 157 people on board. Officials have delivered bags of scorched earth from the crash site to family members of the victims because of the problems with identifying the remains.Thirty-two Kenyans were among the 157 victims of the plane crash. No nation lost more. Citation: Ethiopian airline defends its pilots’ training standards (2019, March 21) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-ethiopian-airline-defends-standards.html Paris investigators start studying Ethiopian jet’s recorder The Ethiopian Airlines jetliner, on a regularly scheduled flight from Ethiopia to neighboring Kenya, carried people from 35 countries when it crashed on March 10 shortly after takeoff from the capital Addis Ababa.The Boeing Max planes have since been grounded around the world as authorities try to identify the problem and Boeing issues an update to its aviation software.Meanwhile, the families of Kenyan victims of the Ethiopian plane crash are asking their government for legal assistance in pursuing compensation.In an emotional gathering Thursday in the Kenyan capital of Nairobi, the victims’ relatives asked for lawyers to help them pursue their case.center_img In this March 14, 2019, file photo a worker walks next to a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane parked at Boeing Field in Seattle. U.S. prosecutors are looking into the development of Boeing’s 737 Max jets, a person briefed on the matter revealed Monday, the same day French aviation investigators concluded there were “clear similarities” in the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Max 8 last week and a Lion Air jet in October. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File) Explore further In this Monday, March 11, 2019 file photo, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for TUI Group sits parked in the background at right at Boeing Co.’s Renton Assembly Plant in Renton, Wash. The Transportation Department confirmed that its watchdog agency will examine how the FAA certified the Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft, the now-grounded plane involved in two fatal accidents within five months. The FAA had stood by the safety of the plane up until last Wednesday, March 13, 2019 despite other countries grounding it. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File) © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. In this March 13, 2019, file photo people work in the flight deck of a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for TUI Group parked next to another MAX 8 also designated for TUI at Boeing Co.’s Renton Assembly Plant in Renton, Wash. U.S. prosecutors are looking into the development of Boeing’s 737 Max jets, a person briefed on the matter revealed Monday, the same day French aviation investigators concluded there were “clear similarities” in the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Max 8 last week and a Lion Air jet in October. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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