Palace boss Alan Pardew salutes Yohan Cabaye after masterclass sinks Baggies

first_imgAlan Pardew singled out Yohan Cabaye for praise after his midfield masterclass guided Crystal Palace to a 2-0 victory over West Brom. Press Association “It was his father’s funeral on Thursday so we didn’t see him,” Pardew said. “I like to think, like when I lost my father, maybe he was looking down on him today so it was a nice moment for Yannick. He has dedicated the goal to his father so it was a nice moment all round. It will be a big boost for him because he wants to score goals.” The victory continued Palace’s impressive start to the campaign and Pardew drew comparisons to some of his more successful times at Newcastle. “The last time we (Palace) had 15 points in the Premier League, we were eating our Christmas dinner and (now) we’ve got it on October 2, so we’ve got ourselves in a great position,” he. “You have periods of form and how long we can keep that we’ll have to wait and see, but I can compare this season to the team I had twice at Newcastle and this is a team that can be as good as that team.” West Brom boss Tony Pulis had a short and successful spell as manager of Palace and won on his first return here last season. But the Welshman was at a loss to explain why the same team he had named in their last away game, a 1-0 win over rivals Aston Villa, had fallen well short of expectations here. “When you pick the same team, I came here with high hopes,” he said. “When Jonny Evans was fit and Gareth McAuley was fit and you’re putting that back four together again – you get that performance and it is chalk and cheese, it is really disappointing. I don’t know if it is confidence or whatever, but you have got to sort it out.” Former Manchester United defender Evans hobbled off after less than half an hour with a hamstring issue, while an ankle knock for James Morrison further depleted Pulis’ options. Both will be hoping to be fit for crunch international fixtures for Northern Ireland and Scotland respectively and Pulis will give them every chance to be involved. When asked if he was concerned by Evans’ injury, he replied: “The concern is obviously for Northern Ireland with the big games they have got. Whether those two (Evans and Morrison) will travel I’m not sure. “The home nations, we want to help them as much as we can so fingers crossed they will be okay, if they are anywhere near it we will give them a chance to play. They will be scanned tomorrow and they will know if they are serious injuries or not.” The France international joined the Eagles in the summer in what was seen as a major coup as he moved from Paris Saint-Germain for a club-record fee. “We approached the game knowing what to expect and we knew we needed to be patient, we played in a controlled manner,” Pardew said. “You need someone like Cabaye to orchestrate that and I thought he was great today in everything he did. “He created the goal at a stage we were starting to worry on the bench and potentially looking for changes. “I know his character and he knew he wasn’t going to be accepting what was happening at PSG, he wasn’t getting a fair opportunity and he needed someone to trust. “He wants to play for his national side at the Euros. I hope everyone in France was watching him today because he was excellent.” Pardew believes Cabaye, should he maintain such form, would make the France squad for next summer’s European Championships in his home country, but there was more to this win than just his performance. Bolasie looked back to his best and capped a superb display with his first Premier League goal at Selhurst Park on what has been an emotional week for the Congo international. With the Baggies having not conceded a goal away from home in the Premier League this season ahead of their trip to Selhurst Park, Palace had to be patient in their attempt to break through a stubborn defence. But Cabaye, who also played under Pardew at Newcastle, held the key as he crossed for Yannick Bolasie to head home before converting his second penalty in six days. last_img read more

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Seegobin, Wilson condemn Diplomats to 202 run thrashing

first_imgDEONARINE Seegobin stroked a match-winning 70 while Stephon Wilson grabbed 6 wickets for the Georgetown Cricket Club (GCC) who whipped Diplomats by 202-runs on Saturday at the GCC ground, Bourda.Action in the Georgetown Cricket Association (GCA)/New Building Society 2nd division 40-over tournament was limited this weekend to the one match played. Seegobin, who led the batting with his half-century, smashed 7 fours and a six, opening the batting for GCC, who eventually made a whopping score of 246 all out in their 40 overs.Timothy McAlmont chipped in with 38 while Carlos LaRose supported with 26 for GCC, as Diplomats skipper, Nigel Sampson, grabbed 3 wickets.Taking full advantage of the home conditions and the big total, GCC followed up their ruthless batting outing with some hostility in the bowling department.A woeful Diplomats eventually crashed to a paltry 44 all out in just 17 of their allotted 40 overs. Left-arm spinner Stephon Wilson returned impressive figures of 6-11 as no Diplomats batsman reached double figures.last_img read more

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Defense, not offense, the key cog in Syracuse improvement

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Forget up-tempo, high-powered offense. Syracuse’s defense is the new fast.Though Syracuse hired head coach Dino Babers for his offensive genius, the Syracuse defense deserves the bulk of the credit for the Orange’s (4-3, 2-1 Atlantic Coast) resurgence. It has fueled what’s shaping up to be Syracuse’s best season in four years, disrupting opponents’ offenses and allowing its own the time it needs to click.The upset over then-No. 2 Clemson Friday offered a showcase of just how far this defense has come. On the biggest stage in recent program history, the SU defense harassed Clemson quarterback Kelly Bryant before knocking him out of the game. It held the defending national champion’s run game to less than half of its season average yards per game. As Syracuse’s offenses continues to put up strong numbers in Year 2 under Babers, it is clear the defense has found the right ingredients to slow down opponents.“We’re just a completely different unit top to bottom,” said senior linebacker and captain Zaire Franklin. “I’m not just saying that. Parris (Bennett) is not the same player he was last year. We all just got better and I think at times we played great but other times we underachieve and that’s disappointing.”“When we take that next step,” Franklin said last month, “we’re really going to be something.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe thing is, Syracuse has already taken that step. Backed by a strong defense, the Orange is a win over No. 8 Miami away from its first stretch of three consecutive conference victories in 16 years. Sixteen years. Yet Syracuse is without safety Antwan Cordy and defensive linemen Kendall Coleman and Josh Black. Graduate transfer Jordan Martin was forced to move to safety, where he has thrived.Yes, the Orange still needs two wins to be bowl eligible for the first time in four years, so don’t get overly excited with five more games — three against Preseason Top 25 teams — remaining on the schedule. But with a chance to upset a second straight Top 10 team and a bye week forthcoming, it’s hard not to imagine the possibilities.Andy Mendes | Digital Design EditorBabers arrived at Syracuse with the promise of a big-time offense. That came in Year 1 and has continued this year. A quick look at this year’s defense shows it’s one of the most improved in college football. Considering the strength of Syracuse’s schedule, SU may have the most-improved defense in the country. In 2016, SU finished 122nd out of 128 FBS teams in total defense. The year prior, Syracuse finished 99th.In the second year of its Tampa 2 system, Syracuse has bucked the trend, placing 38th in both total and rushing defense. Offensively innovative and defensive-minded, the Orange has allowed 35 or more points only once this season. That happened six times a year ago under defensive coordinator Brian Ward’s scheme.“The determination they all have has been ridiculous,” senior offensive lineman Jamar McGloster said. “They’re playing harder than I’ve ever seen them play.”The quick turnaround starts with the defensive line, which takes away pressure from the linebackers and has stymied, punished and befuddled opposing quarterbacks. The unit has forced four starting QBs to leave a game. Syracuse’s front has proved to be the heart of the defense and foundation for strong coverage.The defensive line is much bigger and stronger, led by Chris Slayton and Kayton Samuels, said Julian Whigham, a former Syracuse cornerback and ESPN Syracuse analyst. Last year, highlight reels too often showed SU defensive backs running down field at receivers who had beaten them. This year, big plays are rare. They have molded to the Tampa 2, a zone coverage scheme designed to prevent big plays, and have kept most players in front.On Sept. 30 against N.C. State, the Orange allowed 26 first-half points because it could not defend on the edge. Poor containment and tackling allowed Wolfpack outside runs to routinely stretch for 10 or more yards, though it’s worth mentioning that SU held NCSU to only seven second-half points. Against the Wolfpack, Pittsburgh and Clemson, the big plays came on runs. Those suck the air out of a team. When Syracuse buckles down to limit big plays, it pilots the offense, buying it more possessions and time to shine.“They re-energized themselves to come out this year and prove to everyone else that not only are there good coaches,” Babers said, “but there are good players on that side of the football as well.”Before the season, Babers said SU would have to play better defense to make a bowl. Then, SU would have to lock down in the red zone, get more turnovers and stop teams on third downs. Through seven games, Syracuse owns the country’s third-best third-down defense and 23rd-best red zone defense.“We’re playing a lot faster, a lot smarter,” Franklin said. “I can’t wait to see the finished product.”Look out, because it’s unfolding before our eyes. Comments Published on October 18, 2017 at 9:44 pmlast_img read more

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MP takes the Golf Express route to fundraising

first_img30 Jun 2016 MP takes the Golf Express route to fundraising England Golf is backing an MP’s fundraising golf challenge which draws attention to Golf Express, the campaign to promote 9-hole golf to busy people.Andrew Bingham, the Conservative MP for the High Peak, will play 9 holes at each of seven courses in his constituency to raise money for four local Mountain Rescue teams.The challenge starts at 4.30am tomorrow morning at Glossop & District Golf Club before moving on to Sickleholme, Hope, Buxton & High Peak, Cavendish, New Mills and finally Chapel-en-le-Frith.England Golf Chief Executive Nick Pink will join Andrew at Cavendish and commented: “This challenge supports an excellent cause and also highlights Golf Express. The 9-hole game really is the perfect option for people who are short of time but want to keep playing.”Andrew added: “I’m grateful to England Golf for their support, 9-hole golf is ideal for someone like myself who has a busy work schedule – 9 holes allows me to play all the game in half the time.”Golf Express is a national England Golf campaign to promote 9-hole golf. On average, a 9-hole round can be played in just two hours, which can fit into a busy lifestyle, and it offers all the health and social benefits of the full game. In a 9-hole round a player will walk two to three miles, take over 5000 steps and burn over 450 calories.The Golf Express website offers places to play across the country through its online directory and also features special offers.Andrew Bingham’s Golf Challenge is the latest in his series of annual fund-raising activities for local charities. It is sponsored by Nestlé Waters and has attracted local and national supporters, including the PGA and PING Europe.Donations can also be made at Andrew’s JustGiving page, www.justgiving.com/AndrewBinghamGolflast_img read more

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Seattle wears the villain’s hat for SB

first_imgSeattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch, left, laughs along side teammate Michael Robinson as the participate in a media availability Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, in Jersey City, N.J. (AP Photo)JERSEY CITY, N.J. (AP) — Down at the end of a hotel hallway, about 50 people gathered along with a dozen television cameras to record the thoughts of a running back who doesn’t much like the idea of sharing his thoughts.Marshawn Lynch was in true Beast Mode, though he surely couldn’t appreciate the irony he was actually helping fuel the insatiable beast that is the media surrounding the Super Bowl at a time the game was in need of another good story line.“I’m here, man,” Lynch said. “So, I don’t have to pay the fine, boss.”Lynch likely succeeded in that mission, escaping the wrath of the NFL for not speaking with the media. But the image of him glaring out from beneath a hat and hoodie, gold headphones on top of his head, may be one that sticks this week with the Seattle Seahawks, just as sure as Richard Sherman’s postgame rant did the week before.They’re the designated bad guys in this Super Bowl. And they seem to be enjoying the role.“What is there to get?” asked receiver Doug Baldwin. “He doesn’t like talking to the media.”Worse crimes have been committed, of course, and there are more than enough other players on the Seahawks to fill the void. Sherman himself has emerged as a loquacious spokesman for the team, showing a great depth of thought while answering all questions that have come his way.But a team built behind a ferocious defense by a coach who left the college ranks under a cloud has some rough edges around it. Chief among them is the suspension of seven Seattle players for substance-abuse or performance-enhancing drugs violations by the NFL since 2011.Matched up against Peyton Manning’s great season and his quest for a second Super Bowl ring late in his career, and it’s easy enough to paint the Seahawks in the role of villain.“We don’t worry about reputations and things like that,” said Sherman, who himself was suspended by the league last season for PEDs before winning an appeal. “We worry about football and we have a tremendous football team that goes out there and executes week in and week out. At the end of the day this is the NFL and that’s all that matters.”At the end of the day, the Seahawks are in the Super Bowl, too, which is all that matters to any NFL team. They’ve also got a bit of a different take on the teammates they spend most waking hours with than the media that gets a glimpse just here and there of their varied personalities.That showed with their spirited defense of Sherman in the wake of his tirade against Michael Crabtree following the spectacular play that beat the San Francisco 49ers and put the Seahawks in the Super Bowl. And they were more than happy to line up in support of Lynch’s right to do whatever he wants leading up to the big game.“He’s a misunderstood person, a great guy off the field,” linebacker Bobby Wagner said. “He’s been through a lot in his life and sometimes the media puts words in your mouth and makes a guy mad. He’s not the person you want to make mad.”Still, it was telling that the first two questions to coach Pete Carroll at his Wednesday press conference weren’t about how to defend Manning or stop the touchdown scoring machine that is the Denver Broncos. Instead, they were about Lynch’s refusal to talk and the perception that the vaunted Seattle defense was built on the backs of players taking banned PEDs.Carroll’s answers often meander on any topic, and this one was no different. He talked about how his team is young but is learning from its mistakes and that he doesn’t mind allowing them to be individuals as long as they stay within the team concept.He said the coaching staff has constantly preached the message of having to play clean, despite the suspension as recently as last month by cornerback Brandon Browner for substance abuse and cornerback Walter Thurmond in late November for the same thing.“I’m not concerned about the message,” Carroll said. “We would like to do right and get better, so we’re trying to improve and learn from everything that comes along.”What comes along next is the biggest game any of the Seahawks have ever played. Much has been made of the fact it’s the first Super Bowl any of them will play in, and they’ve made much of their intention to play it as physical as any game they’ve ever played.Odds are they’ll deliver on that promise, though that’s no guarantee of success against Manning and Denver’s precision offense. Seattle isn’t likely to win a shootout, but most handicappers like the Seahawks to win their first Super Bowl trophy if the defense plays like it has all season and Lynch runs the ball effectively.If that happens, all the talk about bad behavior will suddenly go away.And chances are Lynch might even have something to say about that.____Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at tdahlberg@ap.org or http://twitter.com/timdahlberglast_img read more

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