It won’t be easy to remove inspectors

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionReferring to the Dec. 13 editorial encouraging the state to pass a law that would revoke the certification of any building inspector who is found to be guilty of misconduct, don’t think it will be a simple matter.  The certificates they are issued indicates that the candidate has attended mandatory training and that he or she has passed a test. That certification can help a local government decide if a candidate has achieved a basic level of competence. But it doesn’t end there.Don’t forget the civil service system. Who is going to fight to fire this unscrupulous worker who is entitled to due process? I guess that would have to be the local government. Lots of luck there.There are approximately 1,500 local governments in the state. Add in 60 counties and numerous state agencies that also have code enforcement responsibilities. The state is already required to train all if them. What kind of program could the financially strapped state possibly come up with to monitor, investigate and possibly litigate all of the allegations that could arise from such a program. How does one define misconduct?Was the Jay Street fire a result of misconduct or just plain stupidity? Was the inspector incompetent or was he unscrupulously guilty of misconduct. Was the inspector asked to do more than he was capable of? All of these questions will be put to a jury. How could the state rule that he was guilty of misconduct and take away his certification if the court can’t even do it.I don’t think the state would want to be in the middle of that argument.It sounds good on paper. But unless the state comes up with the money to develop and implement any kind of meaningful program, it will be doomed from the start.Don’t get your hopes up.  Roy ScottSaratoga SpringsMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%last_img read more

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New Zealand could delay election after virus return

first_imgIn a statement, the legislature said that step “will no longer be held today” but could be done any time before Oct. 13, potentially pushing the election out by months.Health officials were also locking down aged care homes across the country because they could act as transmission hotspots.”I realize how incredibly difficult this will be for those who have loved ones in these facilities, but it’s the strongest way we can protect and look after them,” Ardern said.Director-general of health Ashley Bloomfield acknowledged the heartbreak of many Kiwis as they come to terms with the return of a virus many thought had been defeated.”I know the virus re-remerging in our community has caused alarm and the unknown is scary,” he said. “[But] we’ve been here before, we can get through it if we work together.”New Zealand had been held up by the World Health Organization as an example of how to contain the disease after recording only 22 deaths in a population of five million, and halting community transmission for more than three months.Ardern described the new cases as “unsettling” but said all efforts were being made to retrace the steps of the Auckland family of four who contracted it from an unknown source.Her center-left Labor Party has been riding high in opinion polls, largely on the back of its success containing the virus through a strict seven-week lockdown earlier this year.With campaigning temporarily halted by the latest virus scare, the conservative National Party said it was open to a delay if circumstances warranted.”It’s going to be very difficult to have an election in mid-September when we are now mid-August. It is very little time,” National leader Judith Collins told TV3.The initial lockdown is only for three days but University of Otago epidemiologist Amanda Kvalsvig said it could last much longer if the source of the infection was not found swiftly.”The aim is to return to alert level one [New Zealand’s lowest] and regain elimination status — but that won’t happen overnight,” she said.”Even after we stop seeing new cases it’ll take time and extensive testing to be sure the virus is once more under control.”The outbreak has already eroded some of the everyday freedoms New Zealanders had enjoyed, with Ardern urging Aucklanders to wear masks and restricting gatherings in the city to a maximum of 10 people.The final match of Super Rugby Aotearoa — which had been set to take place in front of a sold-out 43,000 crowd at Eden Park on Sunday — is also in doubt.The Auckland Blues said its players had been sent home to await advice on whether they can host the weekend’s blockbuster match against newly-crowned champions, the Canterbury Crusaders.Topics : Panic buying returned to supermarkets, huge queues formed at COVID-19 testing stations and face-masked police manned roadblocks on major roads to enforce the new measures. Ardern warned the Sept. 19 election may be have to be delayed if the outbreak could not be contained.”We’re seeking advice from the Electoral Commission, just so that we make sure we have all options open to us,” she said. “No decisions yet, as you can imagine, have been made.”New Zealand’s parliament had been due to be dissolved Wednesday, to allow the election to go ahead. New Zealand’s looming general election could be delayed, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern warned Wednesday, as the shock re-emergence of the coronavirus sent the country’s largest city into lockdown and forced nursing homes nationwide to shut their doors.Ardern said authorities were scrambling to trace anyone who had been in contact with four Auckland residents whose positive tests on Tuesday ended the country’s envied run of 102 days without community transmission.A three-day stay-at-home order for Auckland — a city of 1.5 million people — went into force at lunchtime on Wednesday, ending weeks of near normality, when thousands had flocked to restaurants and filled rugby stadiums.last_img read more

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Angels Offseason Options: Mike Moustakas

first_img Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros (This is the latest in a series of quick profiles on players who fit for the Angels to add over the winter. They are purely “informed speculation,” based on what we know about the Angels’ roster needs along with General Manager Billy Eppler’s preferences and history. We’ll have a new one every weekday, until the GM Meetings, which are the unofficial start of the hot stove season.)MIKE MOUSTAKAS, 3B, Milwaukee BrewersThe basics: A product of Chatsworth High, Moustakas came up as a power-hitting third baseman with the Kansas City Royals, with four seasons of 20 homers. He was widely connected to the Angels as a free agent last winter, but he ended up re-signing with Kansas City and getting traded to the Brewers midseason. He will play most of next season at age 30.2018 season: Moustakas hit .251 with a .315 on-base percentage and 28 homers.Contract status: Moustakas has a mutual option worth $15 million, which means he’s probably going to be a free agent. Last season he made $5.5 million. Why he makes sense: The Angels are not likely to have the room in their payroll or roster for a premium infielder who can only play one position, but Moustakas played a few games at first base last season. If he’s willing and able to play over there more regularly, or even primarily, he could be a good fit for the Angels. The Angels could use one more big bat, preferably who hits left-handed, and if he can play first base and another position, that allows him to fill in when Albert Pujols is not at first, but also be somewhere on the field when Pujols is. The transition to first base should be doable, as long as Moustakas is willing. If Moustakas could play first and third, he’d basically do what the Angels hoped Luis Valbuena would do. A Southern California native, he might have some incentive to do what it takes to fit with the Angels. Another left-handed power bat in the lineup would help balance the roster.Why he doesn’t: He is going to cost some money that the Angels would probably prefer to save for their pitching, since they believe they have enough young players with the offensive upside to give them what they need. Also, his career on-base percentage is only average. Defensively, he’d be a work in progress at first.Previous players: C J.T. Realmuto, RHP Nate Eovaldi, RHP Sonny Gray, LHP Patrick Corbin, LHP CC Sabathia, UT Daniel Descalso, RHP Julio Teheran, LHP Gio Gonzalez, UT Marwin Gonzalez, LHP J.A. Happ, LHP Will Smith.Related Articles Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield center_img Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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