Flyers win second straight game at last night’s home opener

first_imgNext up for the Flyers is a visit from the Grimshaw Huskies on Saturday. Puck drop at the North Peace Arena is at 8:30 p.m. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John Flyers picked up their second straight win against the Falher Pirates 9-2 last night at the North Peace Arena.The Flyers came out flat in the opening twenty minutes of play as the visitors broke the ice and led 1-0 going into the first intermission.The second period saw the home side completely dominate the Pirates. Jordan Harder drew the Flyers even after firing home a shot from the point on a feed from Jeff Shipton and Joey Massingham 4:41 into the frame. Not even a minute later Robbie Sidhu put the home side up 2-1 after a slick feed from Rick Cleaver. Shipton added to the lead three and a half minutes later when he found a loose puck in front of the net and fired it into the empty cage, assisted by Adam Horst and Bryan Lewis. Lewis made it 4-1 with 7:52 remaining in the middle stanza as he finished off a quick passing play with Brady Busche and Robbie Sidhu. Steven Fast beat the Pirates’ goaltender high glove side to make it 5-1 with just under a minute remaining. Tempers boiled over in the last thirty seconds as a fight broke out in the Pirates’ zone with Jordan Geis of the Flyers scoring the takedown. Sam Brennen scored on the ensuing powerplay with ten seconds to play before the second intermission buzzer, making it 6-1. The Flyers outshot their opponents 17 to 4.- Advertisement -The home team didn’t let up in the final stanza as Rick Cleaver found the net after deking around the Pirate defence and netminder for the 7-1 tally at 4:01. Austin Braid got on the score sheet after some nifty passing between Cole Calliou and Taylor Greatrex, two minutes and eleven seconds later, for the eighth goal. The visitors got one back midway through the period but the Flyers restored the seven-goal lead at 9-2 courtesy Jordan Harder’s second of the game, assisted by Reid Campbell and Joey Massingham.Fifteen players contributed for the Flyers, with Rick Cleaver, Jordan Harder, Joey Massingham and Byran Lewis each chipping in with two-point outings.Head coach Andrew Leriger said, “Felt good to come out a get back to back wins. We knew that after last game it wasn’t going to be easy and we didn’t come out strong in the first. Very pleased with the last two periods. Having said that we were icing a full complement of players today for the first time this year, which helps a lot.”Advertisementlast_img read more

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Grizzlies 132, Warriors 117: Kevin Durant explains what led to his 16th technical

first_imgKlay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up!MEMPHIS -– Kevin Durant shook his head repeatedly with dismay.The Warriors’ star did not say a single word to any official. Yet, official Karl Lane issued Durant a technical. The Warriors’ 132-117 loss to the Memphis Grizzlies in their regular-season finale on Wednesday proved inconsequential after already locking up the No. 1 seed earlier this week. But this …last_img

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African city leaders gather in Joburg

first_img3 December 2015Local government was increasingly being identified as the strategic enabler of national economic and development objectives, said South African Local Government Association chairperson Thabo Manyoni, speaking on the first day of the seventh Africities Summit.Africities 7 Summit, as it is official known, is being held in Johannesburg and runs until 3 December. It brings together hundreds of city officials from across the continent, where they are unpacking and exploring the future of urbanisation in Africa. It is an important topic given that more than half of Africa’s population is expected to live in cities by the year 2050, according to Associated Press.Manyoni said the most obvious impact of the current global economic system was rising inequality and its socioeconomic impact. “It is said that Africa and Asia will account for 90% of urban growth over the next 35 years. They have very young populations, which represents a massive potential expansion of the labour force and middle class. This is a great advantage, if properly managed.”Only 28% of the labour force in Africa occupied stable wage-earning jobs, he said, compared to 63% in vulnerable employment, with over 60% of urban dwellers in sub-Saharan Africa currently living in informal settlements.“This means that potential tax bases of urban governments are relatively small, creating a serious financial imbalance to address the vast service delivery and economic infrastructure needs. This must inform a differentiated approach to tackling the development agenda in our context.”Leaders should not forget to invest in the development of small towns and rural villages, which were often the bedrock of agricultural wealth, heritage and cultural diversity, Manyoni added.“We have a responsibility to fashion a uniquely African response to social justice, equality in opportunity and sustainable infrastructure development and resource use.”The summit ties in with the National Development Plan, or Vision 2030, which places emphasis on overcoming the challenges of the present to build a better South Africa and Africa.It was opened by Minister Jeff Radebe, the minister in The Presidency responsible for planning. “What has worked yesterday, might not work today,” he said, placing the focus firmly on looking towards the future.Development had to match population growth or the cities would face more crumbling infrastructure and social unrest, Radebe said.Also part of the discussions over the five days will be climate change as the CoP21 takes place in Paris, as well as urban security following the recent attacks in Bamako, Garissa, Nairobi, Paris and other cities.The central theme of the Africities 7 Summit is “Shaping the future of Africa with the people: the contribution of African local authorities to Agenda 2063 of the African Union”.Agenda 2063 – Towards an Africa We Want encourages all people on the continent to play an active role to see the following vision come to fruition:We aspire that by 2063, Africa shall be a prosperous continent, with the means and resources to drive its own development;Where African people have a high standard of living, quality of life, sound health and well-being;A continent full of well-educated citizens through a skills revolution underpinned by science, technology and innovation for a knowledge society;Cities and other settlements are hubs of cultural and economic activities, with modernised infrastructure, and people have access to all the basic necessities of life including shelter, water, sanitation, energy, public transport and ICT; and,Economies are structurally transformed to create shared growth, decent jobs and economic opportunities for all.Taking its cue from Agenda 2063, organisers say the Africities Summit 7 theme is designed to connect a rigorous understanding of likely future trends with a strategic debate about what needs to be done at the local level, with immediate effect to address the emergency of service delivery, shelter, economic opportunities, safe and affordable mobility and more.The summit intends to be the mouthpiece of the 15 000 African local governments. More than 5 000 local government officials are participating, representing all the stakeholders of African local life as well as their partners of the other regions of the world. The Africities 7 Exhibition is hosting between 400 and 500 exhibitors.The Africities Summit pursues two major objectives:Defining appropriate shared strategies in order to improve the living conditions of the people at local level; and,Contributing to the integration, peace and unity of Africa starting from the grassroots.The meeting has been held in various African cities every three years since it was launched in 1998 in Abidjan, the largest city of Ivory Coast.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

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Annup Sonii to return as host of Crime Patrol, undergoes makeover

first_imgActor Annup Sonii, who was the face of Crime Patrol, will make his comeback to the crime series as a host.He will be seen in an all new avatar in the show, known to bring alive real life crimes on the small screen.The actor will be seen sporting a bearded look and will work his charm as he strongly talks about crime lurking in every nook and corner.He had recently shot for the promo, which will soon air on Sony Entertainment Television channel.”I was associated with the show for seven years before I decided to take a break and focus on my other projects. It feels great to be a part of the show again after 15 months,” Annup said in a statement.”Just like the previous season, this season will also talk about how small incidences trigger a normal person to commit a crime which can be a reflection of their frustration or emotional imbalances.”There is a thin line between a normal person and a criminal mind. It just depends on the thought, how an attempt to pull the other person down is erroneous but thinking to rise above the other person through one’s own efforts is perfectly okay,” he added.Among his upcoming projects, Annup has feature films like Prasthanam, a Netflix original movie and a web series by the makers of Baahubali.Also read | Wait, what? Popular show Crime Patrol now a booklast_img read more

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9 months agoJuventus lodge new appeal for 2005/06 Serie A title removed from Inter Milan

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Juventus lodge new appeal for 2005/06 Serie A title removed from Inter Milanby Carlos Volcano9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveJuventus have lodged a new appeal to have the 2005/06 Serie A title removed from Inter Milan.During the Calciopoli scandal of 2006, Juve had two Scudetti revoked – the 2004/05 title went unassigned, while the 2005/06 title was handed to third-place Inter.This was due to AC Milan, who had finished second, also being docked points in the trial, along with Lazio, Fiorentina, Reggina and Arezzo.Juventus have had several appeals rejected to have the titles returned, or at least the later trophy taken away from Inter.On Saturday, Juve formally lodged another appeal with the Collegio di Garanzia dello Sport tribunal. last_img read more

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Canada Goose shares up after betterthanexpected results plans for new stores

first_imgTORONTO – Shares of Canada Goose Holdings Inc. rose more than 30 per cent on Friday after it reported stronger-than-expected earnings and announced plans for three new stores in North America.Canada Goose stock closed up $18.02 at $78.01 on the Toronto Stock Exchange.The increase came after the luxury parka maker reported a fourth-quarter profit of $8.1 million or seven cents per diluted share compared with a loss of $23.4 million or 23 cents per diluted share a year ago.Revenue for the quarter ended March 31 totalled $124.8 million, up from $51.1 million in the same quarter a year earlier.On an adjusted basis, Canada Goose said it earned $9.9 million or nine cents per diluted share.Economists on average had expected a loss of eight cents per share for the quarter, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.Canada Goose also announced Friday that it would open new stores in Short Hills, N.J., Montreal and Vancouver this fall as part of its retail expansion plan.The locations are expected to open ahead of the 2018 holiday shopping season.For its full financial year, Canada Goose says it earned $96.1 million or 86 cents per diluted share on $591.2 million in revenue. That compared with a profit of $21.0 million or 21 cents per share on $403.8 million in revenue in the previous year.Companies in this story: (TSX:GOOS)last_img read more

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MTV acquires SnowGlobe Music Festival

first_imgNEW YORK — MTV is expanding its live events business in the U.S. by acquiring the SnowGlobe Music Festival.The three-day New Year’s Eve festival takes place in South Lake Tahoe, California. This year’s lineup includes Above & Beyond, Diplo, Eric Prydz, Rezz and RL Grime headlining among more than 40 artists. SnowGlobe will also showcase extreme winter sports demonstrations.Terms were not disclosed in Monday’s announcement. MTV says it’s taking the next step in “its resurgence by expanding deeper into live events.”MTV plans to reinvent its New Year’s Eve coverage, connecting SnowGlobe with MTV’s Times Square studio in New York. The cable network also plans to expand SnowGlobe to additional dates and locations worldwide and leverage its team to launch other new events.MTV launched MTV Studios in June.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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S Korean police apologise for 70yearold island massacre

first_imgSeoul: South Korean police apologised for the first time Wednesday over massacres that killed 10,000 people decades ago and the military expressed deep regret as President Moon Jae-in seeks to re-examine history. On April 3, 1948 members of the communist Workers’ Party of Southern Korea — an ally of the organisation that still rules the North — launched an armed uprising on the southern island of Jeju, attacking a dozen police stations. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US At the time the division of the peninsula had yet to be formalised and the Korean War was still two years away, but the US-supported South was ideologically split following the end of World War II and Japanese colonial rule. The revolt was quickly put down, but while sporadic clashes continued more than 10,000 civilians were killed by South Korean security forces over the next six years, including beyond the end of the Korean War. “We apologise to the innocent people whose lives were sacrificed,” said Min Gap-ryong, the commissioner general of the Korean National Police Agency, at a commemoration of the uprising’s 71st anniversary. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls “We promise to be an organisation that only thinks about and works for Korean citizens so that a tragedy like this will never repeat in our future.” The country’s defence ministry also expressed “deep regret” to the victims, while stopping short of a full apology. The Jeju Incident, as the events are known, remains a highly politicised issue in South Korea, as do some other aspects of the country’s post-war history. Some Jeju-based research and NGOs have claimed it was “Jeju people’s resistance against national division and ‘American Imperialism'”. The police apology and ministry’s expression of regret come after left-leaning South Korean President Moon Jae-in has repeatedly spoken on the importance of “setting our history right”. Moon, who brokered talks between Washington and Pyongyang, has stressed the independence struggle against Japan’s colonial rule is at the heart of national identity in both Koreas, while framing the South’s right-wing — who say the victims of Jeju were all communist rebels — as descendants of pro-Japanese collaborators. Last year, Moon became the first South Korean president in more than a decade to attend the annual memorial ceremony on Jeju. At the event he said: “Young people who were falsely accused of being communists during the April 3 Incident defended their country in the face of death. Ideology was nothing more than a cause that justified the massacre.” In 2003 the then South Korean president Roh Moo-hyun — whom Moon served as chief of staff — offered an apology to the victims of the Jeju incident.last_img read more

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Ohio State panel illuminates discussion on paying college athletes

Vince Doria (far right), Matt Mitten (second from right), Joe Nocera (second from left), and Andrew Zimbalist (far left) are introduced on Friday at the Sports Society Initiative’s forum on paying college athletes. Credit: Mitch Hooper | Lantern reporterThe topic of financial compensation for collegiate student-athletes has been sweeping the nation in recent years, and on Friday, Ohio State, home to one of the country’s most profitable athletic departments, was at the forefront of that discussion.Two separate panel discussions — the first featuring sports policy analysts and writers, and the second consisting of seven former Buckeye athletes — were held on campus in an event organized by the university’s Sports and Society Initiative. The three-hour conversation, titled “Paying College Athletes,” encompassed nearly all sides of the debate, from legal and political angles, to methods and realities of implementation, and to athlete testimonies and alternatives. Dialogue among the panel members was passionate, insightful and respectful, although it jumped around frequently. Yet, that is inherent with any conversation about financial compensation for student-athletes. The issue is so complex, like splitting the atom, that any discussion on it could seem scattered because there are myriad factors to consider and understand.Kristin Watt, an attorney and former OSU basketball player in the 1980s, does not support a pay-to-play model, but she, like the few other panelists with a similar position, completely acknowledged the inequities in the current system. Although she said there likely will be inequities no matter what, there are “absolutely” problems that can be fixed.“Forums like this, I really want to congratulate Ohio State for putting this on,” said Watt, who was on the second panel. “The more we talk about it, the more issues get out and the more people get educated … That’s what helps spur changes.” A high point during the event was when former OSU running back Maurice Clarett delivered his opening statement. Despite his dominant freshman season for the Buckeyes in 2002, Clarett is infamous for his off-the-field tribulations, which included accepting improper benefits that played a role in his dismissal from the university and spending more than three years in prison on multiple charges. When Clarett spoke, the some hundred people in the audience were captivated, clinging to his every word. Clarett said he “absolutely” supports a pay-for-play model for collegiate athletes, citing his personal story as evidence. Growing up in the poverty in Youngstown, Ohio, Clarett said he took money under the table to help him pay personal expenses, namely fixing his car’s transmission. “My spiral of events wouldn’t have happen if I had money,” Clarett said passionately. Clarett said his situation — coming from poverty and needing support beyond just an academic scholarship — is no anomaly. Clarett also spoke poignantly about the lack of emphasis that some programs place on education. Clarett said he was nowhere near the education level needed at OSU and that he was shuffled through classes just to stay eligible. This is common, Clarett said, with those coming from inner city schools. At one point, amid the Youngstown native’s emotional soliloquy on academics, Lawrence Funderburke, a panelist and former OSU basketball player, interpreted. “Preach it,” he said. “Keep preaching.”As Clarett’s opening statement wrapped up, a few members of the audience stood up, applauding. Vince Doria, former Senior Vice President and Director of News at ESPN, started the discussion on the first panel. Doria, an OSU graduate, acknowledged his past employer’s role in the growth of big-time college athletics through massive television deals, yet he said he supports a pay-to-play system. His proposal contains different tiers of payment for players in revenue sports based mostly on playing time. It might not be perfect, Doria said, but at the very least, it “begins to address the unfairness of the current system.” A key portion of Doria’s rationale for supporting additional compensation beyond academic scholarship is that the notion of providing education is misleading, he said. “A scholarship is really the opportunity to achieve an education,” he said. Doria said with the vigorious schedule that athletes have because of games and training, they don’t get the same chance to work outside of the classroom to really take full advantage of the scholarship and obtain a comprehensive education. Joe Nocera, a sports business columnist at The New York Times and co-author of “Indentured: The Inside Story of the Rebellion Against the NCAA,” is outspoken about the reforms he feels are necessary. Nocera left no room for where he stood on the issue, enunciating his clear support for paying student-athletes. In fact, Nocera said he even believes that the term “student-athlete” is incorrect.“(The NCAA) shouldn’t call them student-athletes, but rather athlete-students or employee students, because that’s what they really are,” he said. “Let’s be honest about what the NCAA is. … it’s a cartel.”Former OSU basketball player Kristin Watt (right) speaks at a forum about paying college athletes while former OSU running back Maurice Clarett (left) listens. Credit: Mitch Hooper | Lantern reporterWhen Nocera first began writing about the injustices he believes college athletes face, he said he got emails from readers asking why he was spending his time writing about it. His explanation, delivered passionately on Friday, pierced the crowd.“This is not a sports issue. This is a human rights issue and civil rights issue,” said Nocera, who also brought up the NCAA’s transfer policy, which he denounced. “I came at this through the prism of rights, not pay.” Watt, the former OSU basketball player, was not alone in her opposition to a pay-to-play model. Joining her in dissent was a Marscilla Packer, a fellow former OSU basketball player, Funderburke and Andrew Zimbalist, an economics professor at Smith College in Massachusetts. “I think there are meaningful reforms that can address the economic injustices without going for the pay-for-play model,” said Zimbalist, who cited concerns over growing television revenue and the complicated tax-exempt status donations to athletic departments have. Some of the most common agreed upon reforms that did not involve a direct cash payment included guaranteed scholarships lasting at least four years. Currently, they are for one year, with the option to be renewed. Lifetime health insurance was another proposal that seemed to be agreed upon by all 11 panelists. Nocera said it’s clear that if an athlete sustains injuries while playing sports in college for a university, it’s the school’s duty to make sure the individual has the proper care he or she needs during his or her lifetime. Funderburke, who founded a youth organization after retiring from the NBA, said he has a five-point plan to help student-athletes that does not involve a pay-for-play system. It included mentoring arrangements, life-skills courses for athletes, a deferred-savings stipend and a family emergency fund. “We’re never going to be fair or equitable, but we can at least be sensible,” he said. If there is one thing the panel illustrated, it’s that there is a lot to consider when looking to address injustices in college athletics. Change isn’t going to happen overnight, but having open forums like the panel can prove to be instrumental, said Kelly Trent, a former OSU golfer who is “on the fence” on specifics but agrees collegiate sports are littered with inequity. “For this thing to advance, it’s going to take some giving on both sides,” said Doria, the former executive at ESPN. “And the history of the NCAA in that area hasn’t been good.” read more

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