9 months agoJuventus lodge new appeal for 2005/06 Serie A title removed from Inter Milan

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Juventus lodge new appeal for 2005/06 Serie A title removed from Inter Milanby Carlos Volcano9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveJuventus have lodged a new appeal to have the 2005/06 Serie A title removed from Inter Milan.During the Calciopoli scandal of 2006, Juve had two Scudetti revoked – the 2004/05 title went unassigned, while the 2005/06 title was handed to third-place Inter.This was due to AC Milan, who had finished second, also being docked points in the trial, along with Lazio, Fiorentina, Reggina and Arezzo.Juventus have had several appeals rejected to have the titles returned, or at least the later trophy taken away from Inter.On Saturday, Juve formally lodged another appeal with the Collegio di Garanzia dello Sport tribunal. last_img read more

See More

Canada Goose shares up after betterthanexpected results plans for new stores

first_imgTORONTO – Shares of Canada Goose Holdings Inc. rose more than 30 per cent on Friday after it reported stronger-than-expected earnings and announced plans for three new stores in North America.Canada Goose stock closed up $18.02 at $78.01 on the Toronto Stock Exchange.The increase came after the luxury parka maker reported a fourth-quarter profit of $8.1 million or seven cents per diluted share compared with a loss of $23.4 million or 23 cents per diluted share a year ago.Revenue for the quarter ended March 31 totalled $124.8 million, up from $51.1 million in the same quarter a year earlier.On an adjusted basis, Canada Goose said it earned $9.9 million or nine cents per diluted share.Economists on average had expected a loss of eight cents per share for the quarter, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.Canada Goose also announced Friday that it would open new stores in Short Hills, N.J., Montreal and Vancouver this fall as part of its retail expansion plan.The locations are expected to open ahead of the 2018 holiday shopping season.For its full financial year, Canada Goose says it earned $96.1 million or 86 cents per diluted share on $591.2 million in revenue. That compared with a profit of $21.0 million or 21 cents per share on $403.8 million in revenue in the previous year.Companies in this story: (TSX:GOOS)last_img read more

See More

MTV acquires SnowGlobe Music Festival

first_imgNEW YORK — MTV is expanding its live events business in the U.S. by acquiring the SnowGlobe Music Festival.The three-day New Year’s Eve festival takes place in South Lake Tahoe, California. This year’s lineup includes Above & Beyond, Diplo, Eric Prydz, Rezz and RL Grime headlining among more than 40 artists. SnowGlobe will also showcase extreme winter sports demonstrations.Terms were not disclosed in Monday’s announcement. MTV says it’s taking the next step in “its resurgence by expanding deeper into live events.”MTV plans to reinvent its New Year’s Eve coverage, connecting SnowGlobe with MTV’s Times Square studio in New York. The cable network also plans to expand SnowGlobe to additional dates and locations worldwide and leverage its team to launch other new events.MTV launched MTV Studios in June.The Associated Presslast_img read more

See More

S Korean police apologise for 70yearold island massacre

first_imgSeoul: South Korean police apologised for the first time Wednesday over massacres that killed 10,000 people decades ago and the military expressed deep regret as President Moon Jae-in seeks to re-examine history. On April 3, 1948 members of the communist Workers’ Party of Southern Korea — an ally of the organisation that still rules the North — launched an armed uprising on the southern island of Jeju, attacking a dozen police stations. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US At the time the division of the peninsula had yet to be formalised and the Korean War was still two years away, but the US-supported South was ideologically split following the end of World War II and Japanese colonial rule. The revolt was quickly put down, but while sporadic clashes continued more than 10,000 civilians were killed by South Korean security forces over the next six years, including beyond the end of the Korean War. “We apologise to the innocent people whose lives were sacrificed,” said Min Gap-ryong, the commissioner general of the Korean National Police Agency, at a commemoration of the uprising’s 71st anniversary. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls “We promise to be an organisation that only thinks about and works for Korean citizens so that a tragedy like this will never repeat in our future.” The country’s defence ministry also expressed “deep regret” to the victims, while stopping short of a full apology. The Jeju Incident, as the events are known, remains a highly politicised issue in South Korea, as do some other aspects of the country’s post-war history. Some Jeju-based research and NGOs have claimed it was “Jeju people’s resistance against national division and ‘American Imperialism'”. The police apology and ministry’s expression of regret come after left-leaning South Korean President Moon Jae-in has repeatedly spoken on the importance of “setting our history right”. Moon, who brokered talks between Washington and Pyongyang, has stressed the independence struggle against Japan’s colonial rule is at the heart of national identity in both Koreas, while framing the South’s right-wing — who say the victims of Jeju were all communist rebels — as descendants of pro-Japanese collaborators. Last year, Moon became the first South Korean president in more than a decade to attend the annual memorial ceremony on Jeju. At the event he said: “Young people who were falsely accused of being communists during the April 3 Incident defended their country in the face of death. Ideology was nothing more than a cause that justified the massacre.” In 2003 the then South Korean president Roh Moo-hyun — whom Moon served as chief of staff — offered an apology to the victims of the Jeju incident.last_img read more

See More

Ohio State panel illuminates discussion on paying college athletes

Vince Doria (far right), Matt Mitten (second from right), Joe Nocera (second from left), and Andrew Zimbalist (far left) are introduced on Friday at the Sports Society Initiative’s forum on paying college athletes. Credit: Mitch Hooper | Lantern reporterThe topic of financial compensation for collegiate student-athletes has been sweeping the nation in recent years, and on Friday, Ohio State, home to one of the country’s most profitable athletic departments, was at the forefront of that discussion.Two separate panel discussions — the first featuring sports policy analysts and writers, and the second consisting of seven former Buckeye athletes — were held on campus in an event organized by the university’s Sports and Society Initiative. The three-hour conversation, titled “Paying College Athletes,” encompassed nearly all sides of the debate, from legal and political angles, to methods and realities of implementation, and to athlete testimonies and alternatives. Dialogue among the panel members was passionate, insightful and respectful, although it jumped around frequently. Yet, that is inherent with any conversation about financial compensation for student-athletes. The issue is so complex, like splitting the atom, that any discussion on it could seem scattered because there are myriad factors to consider and understand.Kristin Watt, an attorney and former OSU basketball player in the 1980s, does not support a pay-to-play model, but she, like the few other panelists with a similar position, completely acknowledged the inequities in the current system. Although she said there likely will be inequities no matter what, there are “absolutely” problems that can be fixed.“Forums like this, I really want to congratulate Ohio State for putting this on,” said Watt, who was on the second panel. “The more we talk about it, the more issues get out and the more people get educated … That’s what helps spur changes.” A high point during the event was when former OSU running back Maurice Clarett delivered his opening statement. Despite his dominant freshman season for the Buckeyes in 2002, Clarett is infamous for his off-the-field tribulations, which included accepting improper benefits that played a role in his dismissal from the university and spending more than three years in prison on multiple charges. When Clarett spoke, the some hundred people in the audience were captivated, clinging to his every word. Clarett said he “absolutely” supports a pay-for-play model for collegiate athletes, citing his personal story as evidence. Growing up in the poverty in Youngstown, Ohio, Clarett said he took money under the table to help him pay personal expenses, namely fixing his car’s transmission. “My spiral of events wouldn’t have happen if I had money,” Clarett said passionately. Clarett said his situation — coming from poverty and needing support beyond just an academic scholarship — is no anomaly. Clarett also spoke poignantly about the lack of emphasis that some programs place on education. Clarett said he was nowhere near the education level needed at OSU and that he was shuffled through classes just to stay eligible. This is common, Clarett said, with those coming from inner city schools. At one point, amid the Youngstown native’s emotional soliloquy on academics, Lawrence Funderburke, a panelist and former OSU basketball player, interpreted. “Preach it,” he said. “Keep preaching.”As Clarett’s opening statement wrapped up, a few members of the audience stood up, applauding. Vince Doria, former Senior Vice President and Director of News at ESPN, started the discussion on the first panel. Doria, an OSU graduate, acknowledged his past employer’s role in the growth of big-time college athletics through massive television deals, yet he said he supports a pay-to-play system. His proposal contains different tiers of payment for players in revenue sports based mostly on playing time. It might not be perfect, Doria said, but at the very least, it “begins to address the unfairness of the current system.” A key portion of Doria’s rationale for supporting additional compensation beyond academic scholarship is that the notion of providing education is misleading, he said. “A scholarship is really the opportunity to achieve an education,” he said. Doria said with the vigorious schedule that athletes have because of games and training, they don’t get the same chance to work outside of the classroom to really take full advantage of the scholarship and obtain a comprehensive education. Joe Nocera, a sports business columnist at The New York Times and co-author of “Indentured: The Inside Story of the Rebellion Against the NCAA,” is outspoken about the reforms he feels are necessary. Nocera left no room for where he stood on the issue, enunciating his clear support for paying student-athletes. In fact, Nocera said he even believes that the term “student-athlete” is incorrect.“(The NCAA) shouldn’t call them student-athletes, but rather athlete-students or employee students, because that’s what they really are,” he said. “Let’s be honest about what the NCAA is. … it’s a cartel.”Former OSU basketball player Kristin Watt (right) speaks at a forum about paying college athletes while former OSU running back Maurice Clarett (left) listens. Credit: Mitch Hooper | Lantern reporterWhen Nocera first began writing about the injustices he believes college athletes face, he said he got emails from readers asking why he was spending his time writing about it. His explanation, delivered passionately on Friday, pierced the crowd.“This is not a sports issue. This is a human rights issue and civil rights issue,” said Nocera, who also brought up the NCAA’s transfer policy, which he denounced. “I came at this through the prism of rights, not pay.” Watt, the former OSU basketball player, was not alone in her opposition to a pay-to-play model. Joining her in dissent was a Marscilla Packer, a fellow former OSU basketball player, Funderburke and Andrew Zimbalist, an economics professor at Smith College in Massachusetts. “I think there are meaningful reforms that can address the economic injustices without going for the pay-for-play model,” said Zimbalist, who cited concerns over growing television revenue and the complicated tax-exempt status donations to athletic departments have. Some of the most common agreed upon reforms that did not involve a direct cash payment included guaranteed scholarships lasting at least four years. Currently, they are for one year, with the option to be renewed. Lifetime health insurance was another proposal that seemed to be agreed upon by all 11 panelists. Nocera said it’s clear that if an athlete sustains injuries while playing sports in college for a university, it’s the school’s duty to make sure the individual has the proper care he or she needs during his or her lifetime. Funderburke, who founded a youth organization after retiring from the NBA, said he has a five-point plan to help student-athletes that does not involve a pay-for-play system. It included mentoring arrangements, life-skills courses for athletes, a deferred-savings stipend and a family emergency fund. “We’re never going to be fair or equitable, but we can at least be sensible,” he said. If there is one thing the panel illustrated, it’s that there is a lot to consider when looking to address injustices in college athletics. Change isn’t going to happen overnight, but having open forums like the panel can prove to be instrumental, said Kelly Trent, a former OSU golfer who is “on the fence” on specifics but agrees collegiate sports are littered with inequity. “For this thing to advance, it’s going to take some giving on both sides,” said Doria, the former executive at ESPN. “And the history of the NCAA in that area hasn’t been good.” read more

See More

Michigan falls to Louisville in title game

Buckeye fans won’t have to worry about their archrival celebrating a national championship in basketball this season. The Michigan Wolverines fell Monday night to the Louisville Cardinals, 82-76, in the national championship game. Louisville became the eighth school to win three, or more, national championships and coach Rick Pitino becomes the first coach in history to win a national title at two different schools. In a fast-paced game that saw a combined 158 points, the game came down to the fight in the paint. Louisville’s sophomore forward Chane Behanan made a big impact during the second half, with 12 rebounds that eventually wore down a perimeter oriented Wolverine team. Coming into the game, it was thought that standout freshman forward Mitch McGary would handle the inside for Michigan. However, it was the Cardinals who played with an increased physicality, including eight rebounds and three blocks from junior center Gorgui Dieng. It can also be said that the game was won by the Cardinals well before the second half as they withstood an Wolverine run from an unlikely source. Freshman point guard Spike Albrecht averages 1.8 points per game and saw sporadic playing time during the tournament, but the young guard exploded with a bevy of threes and dropped 17 points in his first 16 minutes of play to give Michigan a 12-point lead at 33-21. With 11:09 to play in the first half, Michigan sophomore guard Trey Burke was hit with his second foul. Michigan coach John Beilein made a crucial decision to sit his star point-guard for the remainder of the first half. The Cardinals capitalized on Burke’s absence by turning up the pressure and going on a run of their own. Louisville junior guard Luke Hancock hit four 3-pointers down the stretch of the first half to whittle the Michigan lead down to one. Louisville carried the momentum through the second half to bring the national title back to the Bluegrass State for a second consecutive season after Kentucky won the national championship last season. The Wolverines were not able to bring the Big Ten a national championship on a year where the conference was considered by many to be the strongest in college basketball. Some Buckeye fans reluctantly pulled for the Wolverines in a display of conference pride, but the Cardinals were just too tough and experienced for their opponents. Hancock was named Most Outstanding Player of the Final Four after two breakout performances. The transfer from George Mason dropped 20 much needed points in the national semifinal against Wichita State, before adding another 22 off the bench in Monday’s title game. read more

See More

Immigration sweep set for LA this weekend San Diego unclear

first_img SAN DIEGO ( KUSI) – Though federal immigration authorities are expected to begin sweeps in Southern California this weekend as part of a nationwide push to arrest undocumented immigrants named in court-ordered deportation warrants, it was unclear Friday if the operation would extend into San Diego County.Lt. Shawn Takeuchi, spokesman for the San Diego Police Department, said officials at his agency had gotten no word of out-of-the-ordinary actions planned by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement authorities in the city.“They do their thing, because they have their goals and priorities, which are different than ours,” Takeuchi said Friday.Takeuchi noted that even if they were aware of any such planned raids, personnel with his agency and other local law enforcement bodies are prohibited by state law — and, in the case of the SDPD, internal policy — from using their resources to aid in federal immigration enforcement.Officials with the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department declined to disclose whether they had been told of any such immigration crackdown planned for upcoming days within their area of jurisdiction.“It would be inappropriate for the Sheriff’s Department to comment on operations conducted by other agencies,” said Lt. Justin White, media- relations director for the county agency.Likewise, ICE officials declined to confirm or deny news stories reporting that the sweep will begin Sunday in 10 U.S. cities, including Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles and Miami. None of the stories mentioned San Diego as being on the list.“Due to law enforcement sensitivities and the safety and security of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement personnel, the agency will not offer specific details related to enforcement operations,” the federal agency asserted in a prepared statement. “As always, ICE prioritizes the arrest and removal of unlawfully present aliens who pose a threat to national security, public safety and border security.”Though ICE sought to keep its strategies for heightened enforcement under wraps, the Los Angeles Police Department issued a statement confirming the reported plans for an immigration sweep this weekend.“The department is aware of upcoming Immigration and Customs Enforcement actions beginning this Sunday, directed toward individuals who have been issued final deportation orders,” the LAPD stated. “These enforcement actions will include individuals residing in the Los Angeles region. The department is not participating or assisting in any of these enforcement actions.”About 140 people are being targeted in Southern California, the Los Angeles Times reported.In its statement, LAPD said its leadership had told members of the local Latino community that Los Angeles police officers would not be participating in the federal actions.“We are committed to protecting the public through meaningful relationship building and community partnerships,” the agency asserted.Before kicking off his reelection campaign, President Donald Trump tweeted Monday night that ICE agents “will begin deporting the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the United States … as fast as they come in.”Taking a stand against the president’s planned immigration sweep, California Gov. Gavin Newsom called the impetus for the proposed raids “cruel” and “misdirected” and said the prospect of their becoming reality was “creating unnecessary fear and anxiety.”Newsom said he wanted state residents to know “they have legal rights and protections, regardless of their immigration status.”“California is a place of refuge — that includes our schools, our courts and our hospitals and clinics,” the governor said. “We hold certain institutions sacred, and people should continue to access programs and services they need.” KUSI Newsroom, June 21, 2019 Immigration sweep set for LA this weekend, San Diego unclear KUSI Newsroom Posted: June 21, 2019 Categories: California News, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

See More

To ace your PhD program interviews prepare to answer—and ask—these key questions

first_imgGrad school interviews—in which aspiring graduate students meet with prospective advisers, colleagues, and other students—are opportunities to connect, engage in scientific conversations, and get a hands-on feel for the graduate programs and broader communities. To make the most of them, you need to prepare in advance so that you can confidently and thoughtfully answer questions from faculty and department members who are deciding whether they want to invite you to join them. You should also ask your own questions to figure out whether the program is right for you. You’ve made it to the last step of the Ph.D. application process: the interview. Congratulations! But amid the excitement and butterflies, don’t neglect the crucial next step: preparation. To get you started, here are 10 common questions to prepare for. Read the whole story: Sciencelast_img read more

See More

BJP booth level leader shot dead in West Bengal

first_imgBurdwan(WB): A BJP booth level leader was shot dead and a party worker seriously injured when unidentified miscreants attacked them in West Bengal’s Paschim Burdwan district, police said Monday. The BJP booth level president, Sandip Ghosh and party worker, Jaidip Banerjee, were returning home after attending a meeting when they were attacked by the miscreants at Malandighi Saraswatigunj area of the district on Sunday night, they said. Banerjee has been admitted to a private hospital in Durgapur, they said. Bijay Ghosh, the father of the deceased, said his son had told him that he was going to attend a picnic. The BJP alleged that Ghosh was killed by TMC goons. Denying the allegations, a Trinammol Congress district leader said that BJP’s internal party rivalry was responsible for Ghosh’s death.last_img read more

See More

Calgary Airport receives 2800 complaints – from two people

first_imgCalgary Airport receives 2,800 complaints – from two people Share CALGARY — Some people have a lot of time on their hands. That seems to be the case with two Calgarians sent into a tizzy over noise levels at Calgary International Airport, voicing their dissatisfaction up to four times a day.According to the Calgary Airport Authority, two people have been the source of 46% of all noise complaints for the airport. That’s 2,800 complaints made from two people alone.According to CBC News Calgary, Bob Sartor, CEO of the Calgary Airport Authority, told city council that overall noise complaints were down more than one-third from the previous year.“There are certain people that the only thing that will satisfy them is a shut down of an airport that employs 48,000 people directly and indirectly and generates almost $8.3 billion of GDP for the city,” said Sartor. “There are some constituencies with which we will never win.”Sartor admitted there were mistakes made during the construction of the new tarmac in 2014. Even so, he said, new flight paths over industrial areas have forced planes to fly higher and straighter, effectively reducing the noise.More news:  Hotel charges Bollywood star $8.50 for two bananas and the Internet has thoughts“And in fact, our complaints are down 39% year over year and if we were to back out the individuals who complain almost four times a day, they’d be down materially,” he said. << Previous PostNext Post >> Thursday, March 23, 2017 center_img Posted by Tags: Airports, Calgary, LOL Travelweek Group last_img read more

See More

Some 242 million UK homes will have Freeview HD c

first_imgSome 24.2 million UK homes will have Freeview HD compliant set-tops by 2014, with the number of set-tops and TVs in the market rising to 39.8 million by 2016, according to a report by Futuresource consulting for Freeview.YouView alternative Connect TV cited the research to highlight that its almost all UK homes would have access to its services by 2014. Connect TV brings internet-delivered content to the Freeview EPG. The service works on all compliant Freeview HD devices and offers live streaming and on demand services. Connect TV launched its service with a line-up of 45 internet-delivered channels in February this year.last_img

See More

Multichannel broadcaster UKTV is set to launch a n

first_imgMultichannel broadcaster UKTV is set to launch a new British drama network on UK digital-terrestrial service Freeview. The free channel, called Drama, is due to go live on July 8 and will broadcast a range of catalogue drama from the past 40 years, including Lark Rise to Candleford, Sharpe, Pride and Prejudice and Tipping the Velvet. It is the first UKTV channel to launch since the 2009 introduction of lifestyle network Really, and joins UKTV’s line-up of other free-to-air channels, the male-skewing Dave and factual network Yesterday.“Drama is targeted at a different audience demographic than our other highly successful free-to-air channels,” said UKTV controller Emma Tennant. “The channel is aimed at people who simply love drama and want to watch critically-acclaimed shows that have absolutely defined the landscape of British television.”last_img read more

See More

UPC Poland CEO Ramiro Lafarga Brollo is to leave h

first_imgUPC Poland CEO Ramiro Lafarga Brollo is to leave his post to take on a role outside Liberty Global, the Polish cable operator’s owner.Liberty Global did not provide further information on the reasons for Lafarga Brollo’s move, or on who would replace him.The company said that Lafarga Brollo had significantly contributed to the development of UPC Poland, including the launch of the Horizon advanced TV platform, since he took on his role in July 2014.Lafarga Brollo said that he was happy to report that after a year and a half in his post the operator had reinforced its position and had maintained its leading position in infrastructure, product innovation, its competitive offering and high quality customer service.Lafarga Brollo was previously CEO of O2 Slovakia.His move is the latest in a series of senior management changes at Liberty Global’s central and eastern European operations. In June, the company named UPC Romania and Hungary CEO Severina Pascu as head of the entire CEE region, replacing Betzalel Kenigstein. She was replaced as Romanian chief executive by CMO Robert Redeleanu.UPC Poland named former Orange Poland executive Tomasz Izydorczyk as marketing director and Zoltan Bodnar as finance director in September.last_img read more

See More

In this short but packed interview by Chuck Jaffe

first_imgIn this short but packed interview by Chuck Jaffe, contrarian investing legend Doug Casey explains why government is becoming an anachronism, what 2014 is likely to bring to the financial world, and why he isn’t an investor. There’s a reason why Doug Casey’s appearances always fill the room: he’s not only a brilliant contrarian investor, but a clear and cogent voice cutting through the political mumbo-jumbo. And now you have the chance to pick the brain of this serially successful multimillionaire… right at a time when being a disciplined speculator could turbocharge your wealth. Get the details and get started right now.last_img

See More

The Trump administrations decision to abandon the

first_imgThe Trump administration’s decision to abandon the Affordable Care Act in an ongoing court challenge could affect some of the most popular pillars of the law — further intensifying the fight over health care in the middle of an election year.It is unusual for the Justice Department to refuse to defend existing law in court challenges. In this case, 20 states sued the federal government in February claiming the individual mandate is unconstitutional after Congress zeroed out the tax penalty for not having health insurance in its 2017 tax cut law. The lawsuit, led by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, contends that without an individual mandate, the entirety of the ACA, commonly known as Obamacare, is unconstitutional.If that argument prevails in the courts, it would render unconstitutional Obamacare provisions that ban insurance companies from denying coverage to people with pre-existing conditions — arguably the most popular component of the 2010 health care law.As many as 130 million adults under age 65 in the U.S. have pre-existing conditions that could result in their not being able to get insurance coverage in the private market, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. The Kaiser Family Foundation puts the number at about a quarter of the country’s under-65 population. A Kaiser tracking poll in June 2017 showed 70 percent of adults want Congress to keep pre-existing condition protections.Before the Affordable Care Act became law, insurance companies routinely declined health insurance coverage to people who had ongoing medical conditions or recent illnesses. Even when insurers offered policies to those with health problems, they often excluded those illnesses. And insurance companies could cancel coverage for people who became ill once the policy year ended.The ACA made all those practices illegal. By withdrawing from defending the law in court, the Trump administration is saying it no longer supports those consumer protections, which are popular with voters. The move could upend insurance markets for next year and change the dynamic of this fall’s elections.”This suit comes as insurers are proposing individual market premiums for 2019. The lawsuit injects more uncertainty into what is already an uncertain environment for insurers. Insurers hate uncertainty, and they respond to it by hedging their bets and increasing premiums,” says Larry Levitt, senior vice president at the Kaiser Family Foundation.Nicholas Bagley, a professor at the University of Michigan Law School who had been a Justice Department lawyer, says DOJ’s move is troubling.”The Justice Department has a long-standing, durable, bipartisan commitment to defend acts of Congress. It’s a cornerstone of what they do,” he says. “For the Trump administration to crumple that up and throw it out the window is galling.”Just hours before the Justice Department officially withdrew from the case, three of the staff attorneys who had been working on it withdrew. “These are civil servants. They’re not political. They are good soldiers. Their job is to defend federal programs,” Bagley says, noting that he has not talked with any of them about the case. “They believed they could not in good conscience, consistent with their professional obligations, sign the brief. These are people who defend programs they disagree with all the time.”The Justice Department has opted not to defend existing law in the courts in other matters. For instance, in 2012 the Obama Justice Department said it would not defend the Defense of Marriage Act, which legally defined marriage as a union between a man and a woman for federal purposes.America’s Health Insurance Plans, the trade association for health insurance companies, supports the pre-existing condition protections under the ACA. “Removing those provisions will result in renewed uncertainty in the individual market, create a patchwork of requirements in the states, cause rates to go even higher for older Americans and sicker patients, and make it challenging to introduce products and rates for 2019,” AHIP said in a statement.AHIP said it will file an amicus brief in support of the law that “provides more detail about the harm that would come to millions of Americans if the request to invalidate the ACA is granted in whole or in part.”On Capitol Hill, congressional Republicans’ reaction to the Trump administration’s decision was muted, with many lawmakers voicing skepticism that the courts would ultimately rule against a law already upheld by the Supreme Court.”We need to let that go forward and see if it goes anywhere,” said Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-N.J. “I don’t know if that legal logic will fly or not.” MacArthur worked on legislation to continue pre-existing condition protections during the GOP’s unsuccessful effort to repeal Obamacare last year.While the ACA has been the target of a sharply divided and partisan debate for nearly a decade, pre-existing protections are one of the most popular actions Congress has taken in modern times. “I think that’s a pretty essential pact with the American people,” said MacArthur.Health care is already a dominant issue in this year’s elections, with voters regularly citing it as a leading determinant for how they will vote.”There is no doubt that Republicans are responsible for the rising cost of healthcare premiums and the high likelihood that many will no longer be able to afford basic care at all, and they will face serious blowback in the midterms,” the House Democrats’ campaign operation said in a statement. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

See More

Apple CEO Tim Cook says hes optimistic about trad

first_imgApple CEO Tim Cook says he’s optimistic about trade talks between the U.S. and China. His remarks come as representatives from both countries are scheduled to meet later this week in Beijing.”Both sides are talking and I always think that is always the essential thing to reaching an agreement,” Cook told NPR on Monday. “… It’s in both parties’ best interests to come together.” Apple has much to lose if the talks don’t go well. China has been a key part of Apple’s growth. Analysts say close to 20 percent of the company’s business comes from China and Taiwan.A March 1 deadline looms over the talks. The Trump administration says if an agreement is not reached by then over issues such as intellectual property rights, it will increase tariffs on Chinese imports from 10 percent to 25 percent.Much of Apple’s growth in China has come from the sales of its marque product — the iPhone. However, Apple had to revise its earnings forecast downward in the winter quarter, largely due to slower iPhone sales in China. Cook attributed slower sales in China in part to the devaluation of the yuan. “Because the local currency devalued over the course of the year,” he said, “our prices did go up there, more so than did in regions that are U.S. dollar denominated.” In response, Cook said, Apple has cut prices in China to be in accord with prices before the currency devaluation. “We’ll see how that works out for us,” he said. If the U.S. and China fail to reach an agreement by March 1, and the U.S. raises tariffs to 25 percent, analysts say, Chinese officials may retaliate and punish U.S. companies doing business there, further dampening Apple’s ability to compete in one of the world’s largest markets.Despite slowing iPhone sales, Apple is seeing growth in other areas, especially in services — which include Apple Pay and Apple Music. Apple reported services brought in a record $10 billion in the winter quarter.The company is also investing heavily in health care, rolling out features such as an electrocardiogram that helps detect heart problems using its Apple Watch.Over the last year, Apple has also been in the process of rolling out a service that stores medical records from a variety of hospitals and providers in one place. On Monday, it announced a new partnership with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, which will allow veterans using the VA’s health services to use the Health app on iPhones.Cook says the app provides veterans with the ability to view their allergy conditions, lab results and medications in one spot. “This is part of our overall effort to really empower the patient,” he said. “We can’t wait to serve … a population of folks that we really have great reverence for.”The app will allow a veteran to visit a doctor and be able to immediately share records without having to contact the offices of other clinicians and providers.Last March, Apple rolled out this service to other health care providers such as Stanford Medicine, NYU Langone Health and Johns Hopkins Medicine.A report by research firm CB Insights said “the market opportunity in healthcare is huge, and Apple sees healthcare and wellness as a core part of its app, services, and wearables strategies.” The report said global spending in health care exceeds $7 trillion a year, dwarfing the size of the smartphone market.Officials at the VA and leaders at other health care facilities say Apple’s strong emphasis on security and privacy is part of the reason they are partnering with the company on health records. Cook has been a vocal proponent of privacy, calling out companies like Facebook for using the personal data of its users to sell lucrative ads.While Cook may be optimistic about China-U.S. relations, Apple may need to look elsewhere if it wants to keep up the pace of growth it’s had for some 15 years. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

See More

Michel Yao says his job is a lot like being a dete

first_imgMichel Yao says his job is a lot like being a detective.Yao is leading the World Health Organization’s on-the-ground response to the ongoing Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. And as each new person falls sick, his team must race to figure out how the person got infected. So, Yao says, “we ask the person a series of questions.”First up: Were you in contact with any sick person who had some symptoms like bleeding or like fever? Perhaps a relative you were taking care of? No? OK, did you attend a funeral? (At traditional funerals, mourners often wash the body, another way many people are infected with Ebola.)No, again? Well, then, have you recently touched any dead animals?But some weeks ago, as cases started erupting around two towns, Katwa and Butembo, the investigators found that patient after patient had something else in common: They had all recently visited a health clinic for treatment for some other disease such as a respiratory infection or malaria. “They would say, ‘I went to the hospital. They treated me. I got clear [of that illness]. And then a few days after, I start having fevers.’ ” Fevers that were the first of signs of Ebola. The surge of confirmed cases in Katwa and Butembo – 307 and rising — is now the largest flare-up during the course of this outbreak, which has infected nearly 900 people since August. And WHO officials estimate that in about one-fifth of these recent cases, the person contracted Ebola at health care facilities.When Yao started visiting the clinics, it was pretty obvious how this was happening: Even government-run facilities such as large hospitals hadn’t set up triage tents to separate possible Ebola patients from everyone else.”This disease is not well-known in this part of the country. It is the first time,” Yao explains, even though Ebola has broken out in other parts of the DRC on multiple occasions. Even more problematic, says Yao, are the hundreds of unofficial private health facilities in this area. Some are large operations. In many other cases, says Yao, “it’s just a house — a very old house.”And often a crowded one at that. “In one bed putting two children.”These facilities are also often short on supplies. “You can see people using several times the same gloves or the same equipment,” including syringes, says Yao.Along with modern medicine, many facilities also offer traditional cures. (Indeed, health officials commonly refer to such facilities as “tradi-moderns.”) And this too creates opportunities for infection, says Yao. That’s because the traditional medicines are often diluted in water and put in a cup for the patient to drink. Then, he has noticed on his visits, the cup often isn’t cleaned before it’s passed on to the next patient.In response to all these findings, Congo’s government and the WHO are trying to reach out to every one of these health facilities in Katwa and Butembo. In conjunction with a range of nonprofit aid organizations, they are training the staff on infection control and providing them with necessary protective equipment.But it’s a daunting task. Just finding all the private clinics is difficult because there’s no official list, says Yao. Officials know about only the ones reported by Ebola patients.Dr. Cimanuka Germain of International Medical Corps, which is helping with the effort, says private clinics sometimes resist the help.For instance, when he told the staff of one clinic that they should report suspected Ebola cases to a hotline instead of treating them, their response was: “This is not possible for us.” That facility treats about 65 patients a day, says Germain. They didn’t want to lose business.Then there’s the facility where Germain spent days training nurses on how to set up and operate a triage tent. Two weeks ago he showed up for a surprise visit.”One of them was there without wearing gloves,” Germain says, sighing incredulously.For Germain the takeaway was clear: “To change someone’s behavior is not [a matter of] one day or two days — you need time.”He had been visiting weekly — but from that point on he assigned two people from his organization to keep watch at the clinic all day every day. And he has done the same thing for the 11 other facilities working with International Medical Corps. Officials are optimistic the watchdogging will work because of the success of similar efforts in a town called Beni — about 40 miles from Katwa. Last autumn, Beni was the epicenter of the outbreak, with the number of cases ultimately topping 200. But over the last three weeks, the caseload there has dropped to nearly zero.Yao, of the World Health Organization, says improving infection control in Beni’s health clinics played a big role in the change. Still, Yao notes, “it took us more than two months to reach these results.”Laurent Sabard, health coordinator with the International Committee of the Red Cross, which has been working with health facilities in Beni, says they can’t afford to let up anytime soon.”We have to continually follow up,” he says. If only to ensure they don’t run out of supplies. The thermometers given out by the Red Cross are a thermoflash type that lets you take someone’s temperature without touching the person, notes Sabard. “But they have to change the battery regularly — so we have to provide them with batteries regularly.”Adding to the difficulty is the insecurity of the area, where multiple armed groups frequently clash with government forces. Paul Lopodo of Save the Children — which has been working with 39 health centers in the outbreak zone — recalls how back in December the violence prevented the group from checking in with one public clinic for two weeks. By the time they returned, the staff was so out of practice, says Lopodo, that “we had to the run the training all over again.” Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

See More

Activists are today 4 August set to hold a vigil

first_imgActivists are today (4 August) set to hold a vigil outside the Japanese embassy in central London to express their “horror and huge sadness” at last week’s mass killings of 19 disabled residents of a care institution in Japan.The idea for the vigil came from disabled activist Eleanor Lisney, who is east Asian herself, with support from fellow activist Dennis Queen, a leading member of the disabled people’s anti-euthanasia network Not Dead Yet UK.The hope is to hand the embassy 19 lilies, one for each of the 19 deaths, and the results of an online book of condolence organised by Disabled People Against Cuts, Inclusion London and People First (Self Advocacy).Another vigil, unconnected with the London event, was also due to take place today in Lancaster.Lisney said: “I am just hoping to show solidarity, to show that if you do things in one part of the world, it would not go unnoticed [in another part].“I was really upset by what was happening and really sad that this happened in a care facility.“I think we have to show solidarity because what happens to one of us happens to all of us. They were our brothers and sisters.”A former care worker in the Tsukui Yamayuri En institution in Sagamihara allegedly broke into the building last week and murdered 19 disabled people with high support needs, and injured 25 others.It has been reported that he then drove to a police station and told officers: “I did it. It is better that disabled people disappear.”It has been said that he had previously written a letter to a senior parliamentary figure, in which he argued that the Japanese government should legalise euthanasia of disabled people, and that he would be willing to carry out hundreds of killings himself by targeting two care institutions.The day before he quit his job, in February this year, he reportedly told co-workers that he thought all disabled people should be killed.The next day, he was committed to a mental health hospital, where he apparently told an official: “There are 800 million people with disabilities worldwide. Money is spent on them. It should be used for other purposes.” He was discharged from the hospital two weeks later.In a statement released after the killings, the Japan National Assembly of Disabled Peoples’ International (DPI-JAPAN) said that if his words were as reported, his actions were “purely caused by the eugenics that questions the existence of persons with disabilities”.He added: “We, DPI-JAPAN, reaffirm our commitment to fight against eugenics with great anger and grief.“During recent years, there are increased incidents of hate crime and hate speech against persons with disabilities and other minority groups.“This particular incident should not be overlooked. Now, more than ever, [there is a] need to create an inclusive society which does not allow hate crime or hate speech.”Lisney said she was partly motivated to organise today’s vigil by comments on social media that suggested part of the explanation for the killings lay within Asian culture.She said: “I got really annoyed about that, because eugenics is not in Asian culture.”Lisney said she believed that the targeted violence experienced by disabled people in the UK is more subtle than the horrors experienced by the residents of Tsukui Yamayuri En, and comes instead from the government, with its policies aimed at cutting support for disabled people.As she wrote yesterday in her blog: “It is not as gory as a bloodied kitchen knife in the middle of the night but the result is both ending in pain filled deaths as a result of their disabled status.“And the reasoning behind both is that disabled people’s lives are not worth keeping.” Lisney said she also saw a similarity with the attitudes behind the new assisted dying bill introduced by the Tory peer and former MP Lord Hayward, treasurer of Dignity in Dying, who has launched another push to legalise assisted suicide in the House of Lords.She said: “In this country they might call it mercy killing but to me it’s just packaging: ‘You’re bloody useless, you’re just a drain on resources, why don’t we make you go away?’“It’s no different to this guy [in Japan].”Queen said the vigil was important because it was “important to show solidarity to the survivors of this massacre and to show our sadness at the people whose lives have been lost and just share our thoughts and love with their families and everyone involved”.Like Lisney, she said the beliefs that appeared to have prompted the actions of the alleged killer were “something we are very familiar with and face every day”.She said: “This is the eugenics thinking that believes we are not worthy of money, of oxygen, of the space, of the care and the love that we share with our families.“We can’t escape it and that is partly where the solidarity is coming from. We recognise exactly the same hatred here and we experience it here.“It’s bringing a wave of solidarity across the globe.”She said it would not be a shock if something similar to the Japanese killings happened in Britain, and she agreed with Lisney that the same type of eugenics-type thinking – that disabled people are not worth spending money on – was already contributing to people’s austerity-related deaths, for example through sub-standard healthcare or losing their social care.She said: “Much of the thinking behind [the assisted dying bill] is tainted with the same eugenic thinking.“It is still rooted in the same idea that at some point some lives are not worth living.“We at Not Dead Yet UK disagree with this idea; we believe every day of every person’s life is just as valid and valuable as everyone else’s, and that each of us deserve the same right to live.“I think a lot of people would like to think they can ‘keep it polite’ and that thoughts don’t lead to anything, but to keep perpetrating the idea that some lives are not worth living is what leads to outcomes like this.”Picture: Disabled activists including Penny Pepper (right) and Sophie Partridge (centre) at the vigil this afternoonlast_img read more

See More

The trio missed last weeks win over Widnes throug

first_imgThe trio missed last week’s win over Widnes through injury but are set to be named in the side for the trip to the KCOM Stadium (7.45pm).It leaves Head Coach Justin Holbrook with a nice selection headache, particularly as winger Adam Swift scored a hat-trick on his return to the side.“I was really pleased for Adam,” he said. “He worked really hard to get back in the side and then to go and produce a performance like that and score a hat-trick was awesome for him.“I was impressed with our win over Widnes. I think it was probably the best we have played for the last few weeks. It was a dominant 80 minute performance.“People look at the table and see where Widnes are sat but for us, and how we judge how we are playing, it’s not about who we are playing but how we are playing and how we go about it.“We were fantastic in every area of the game and I couldn’t be happier.”Saints face Hull FC for the third time this season and a win would ensure their top of the table position heading into the Super 8s.They sit six points clear at the summit with three games remaining of the regular season.“It’s all about maintaining our performance,” Holbrook added. “We are constantly making small changes with the way we play with the ball and that is key in keeping the opposition guessing.“It’s too long a season and too hard a sport not to maintain that. You cannot afford to get comfortable. We will make sure we are fresh at the end of the season but we also need to make sure we are ready every week.“That continues on Friday. Hull will be disappointed with how they played last week. They are a good quality side across the park and are a tough side to face.“We’re ok with that. It will be a really hard game.”Tickets for Friday’s game are available from the Ticket Office at the Totally Wicked Stadium, by calling 01744 455 052 or online here.last_img read more

See More