Gardai looking for owner of this flash BMW – no kidding!

first_imgGardai in Letterkenny have issued an appeal for the owner of this red BMW and they’re not kidding.Well, actually they are.The red sporty child’s BMW was found today in Letterkenny Town and is now at the Garda Station. A spokesman said “Is this fast car yours? Are you furious that you have lost it?“We are sure that there is a child somewhere missing it!”Please call Letterkenny Gardaí on 0749167100 if you are the owner.And no, there are no outstanding parking tickets on it….. Gardai looking for owner of this flash BMW – no kidding! was last modified: December 14th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Flies Turn on a Dime

first_img51; A fly can turn 180 degrees in one tenth the time it takes you to blink an eye.  Beating their wings 250 times a second, they don’t even have to think about each wing beat, PhysOrg said about studies at Brown University using high-speed cameras and image tracking software.  “[Attila] Bergou discovered that flies rely less on their brains than previously thought and more on the clever design of their wings,” the article said.  “To make a turn, a fly simply twitches a muscle that rolls its shoulder slightly.  The wing does the rest, naturally adjusting over the course of a few beats, tilting by about 9 degrees, and creating drag forces that wheel the insect around.”  The article includes a 32-second video clip that allows you to watch the turn in slow motion.    The U-turn of the fly is much faster than anything man-made can achieve.  A scientist at Harvard is looking enviously at the fly, the article said, for envisioning electrical flying robots that may some day come close to matching the fly’s design specifications.Evolution makes sense when you think in generalities.  When you look at things in detail, and measure what is required to make them function, you start thinking in terms of design specifications.  You want to imitate them.  When you try to imitate them, and find out how hard it is, you become an intelligent design believer.  Darwinian excuses like, “Evolution had a million year head start,” begin to sound like desperate question-begging attempts to hang onto an obsolete dogma that has lost its credibility in the details.(Visited 39 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Driving Our SUVs to the BP Protests

first_imgI’m sorry, but the irony is just too thick these days. We Americans are rightly upset with BP for the devastating spill in the Gulf that is wreaking ecological devastation on a mammoth scale. But as I watch the television news and read the daily coverage, I’m not hearing enough outrage at our petroleum-dependent lifestyles and the gas-guzzling vehicles we hop into at a moment’s notice to drive to the store for a pint of ice cream. We need to hold a mirror up to ourselves at those protest rallies.Oil spills are tragic on multiple levels: to the affected ecosystems; to those who depend on the region’s bounty for their livelihoods; to the tourism industry in the region; and even to employees at the oil companies and public agencies whom we have to assume are trying hard to do the right thing. Residents of the Gulf Coast and ecosystems are being — or will soon be — devastated by the spill that continues to hemorrhage tens of thousands of barrels of oil into the Gulf daily. We must redouble efforts to protect coastal wetlands while workers with their undersea robotic vehicles continue trying to stem the leak. And we certainly should hold the companies that caused the leak liable for the costs of cleanup, as well as for the economic damage both the oil and its cleanup are causing. Those impacts will likely be measurable for years, if not decades.But at the same time, we too — consumers of the oil and gas we are going to ever-greater effort to harvest — must share some of that blame. Every once in a while we are reminded in a very dramatic way of the larger impacts of our profligate consumption of oil. The Santa Barbara oil spill in January 1969 spilled 200,000 gallons of crude oil, despoiling a 35-mile stretch of the California coastline and resulting in a ban on offshore drilling. Twenty years later in March, 1989, the Exxon Valdez oil tanker spilled 10.8 million gallons of crude oil, ravaging the rich biodiversity along a 1,300-mile span of Prince William Sound coastline and leading to tighter regulations on shipping oil, including the requirement for double hulls in the oil tankers that haul billions of gallons of oil around the world each year.Now, after two more decades, another oil spill is dominating the news. As with the other two described, this one is far larger than the previous one. By government estimates, the BP spill has already spewed 22-35 million gallons (at least twice as much oil as the Exxon Valdez), and some experts say the rate of flow from the disabled blowout valve is significantly greater. While progress appears to have been made in capturing some of the gushing oil, we are told that it will be months before the well is permanently capped and the spill fully contained.These spills are horrible, of course, but so too are the spills that occur when the oil pans in our cars drip oil. Each year in the U.S. roughly 180 million gallons of motor oil is either dumped down the drain during oil changes or is leaked from engine crankcases, according to the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. The few drops of gasoline that most of us spill each time we fuel up our cars add up to hundreds of thousands of gallons per year nationally. Leaks from our outboard motors leave that familiar iridescent sheen on the water. The lubricating oil we use in our chainsaws is deposited directly onto the ground as we cut our cordwood (as it’s intended to do). These smaller incremental leaks each year add up to many times as much oil contamination as the BP spill to date.This is not at all meant to trivialize the BP spill, but rather to point out the significance of oil spills that we consumers can do something about. We can repair our cars so that they don’t drip motor oil. We can be more careful when fueling up. We can use biobased lubricating oil for chainsaws. And, of course, we can use less energy—by driving less and better insulating our houses.If we’re serious about our anger at the BP oil spill in the Gulf, we should direct a large share of that anger at our own consumption of petroleum in our cars and our homes. As Pogo said in Walt Kelly’s famous comic strip: “We have met the enemy and he is us.”Interested in your thoughts.Alex Wilson is the executive editor of Environmental Building News and founder of BuildingGreen, LLC. To keep up with his latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feeds.last_img read more

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NBA fines Anthony Davis $50,000 for making public trade demand

first_imgUS judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants LATEST STORIES At 22-28 with seven losses in their past eight games, the Pelicans are 13th of 15 clubs in the Western Conference, 5.5 games behind the Los Angeles Clippers for the eighth and last playoff berth.Davis, out since January 19 with a sprained left index finger but due back imminently, could become a free agent in 2020 and sign a five-year contract extension worth $240 million after this season.The Pelicans have missed the playoffs in four of six seasons since drafting Davis, but swept Portland in the first round of last season’s playoffs for their first post-season series triumph since 2008. New Orleans fell in the second round to eventual champion Golden State.The Los Angeles Lakers, whose superstar LeBron James is also represented by Paul, and Boston Celtics are expected to be interested in Davis, but the Pelicans do not want the process to become a free-for-all as they risk losing him for nothing unless he is traded.“We have also requested the league to strictly enforce the tampering rules associated with this transaction,” the Pelicans said, a reference to NBA rules prohibiting teams from trying to lure players who are under contract.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte MOST READcenter_img Davis violated a rule in the owners-players union agreement banning public trade demands, the fine coming for agent Rich Paul’s statements to ESPN that the NBA characterized in announcing the fine as “an intentional effort to undermine the contractual relationship between Davis and the Pelicans”.The Pelicans confirmed Davis wanted to leave in a statement Monday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“Relative to specific talks of a trade, we will do this on our terms and our timeline,” the team said. “One that makes the most sense for our team and it will not be dictated by those outside of our organization.”Davis, top pick in the 2012 NBA Draft, shares second in the NBA with 29.3 points a game and third in the league with 13.3 rebounds per contest. PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Australian PM asks Thailand to free detained soccer player FILE – New Orleans Pelicans forward Anthony Davis reacts after making a 3-point shot during the first half of Game 4 of the team’s first-round NBA basketball playoff series against the Portland Trail Blazers in New Orleans, Saturday, April 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Scott Threlkeld)Anthony Davis was fined $50,000 by the NBA for making a public trade demand on Tuesday, a day after his agent went public with his desire to leave the New Orleans Pelicans.Davis, a five-time All-Star and member of the 2012 London Olympic gold medal squad, told the team he will not sign a contract extension and wants to be traded to an NBA contender before the league’s February 7 transfer deadline.ADVERTISEMENT PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town View commentslast_img read more

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