‘His love for the game’: An oral history of Joe Thornton’s crazy comeback gantlet

first_imgSAN JOSE — The inevitable is now official: Joe Thornton is the Sharks nominee for the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy.At this point, the story is almost deserving of its own feature film: a future Hall of Famer suffers two major-knee injuries in a 10-month span, fights his way back onto the ice at age 39 and plays a key role in a contender’s run to the playoffs. The only missing piece is a Hollywood finish with the Stanley Cup being hoisted at SAP Center in June.In short, Thornton is a walking …last_img

See More

Hand or foot spasms

first_imgDefinitionSpasms are contractions of the muscles of the hands, thumbs, feet, or toes. Spasms are usually brief, but they can be severe and painful.Alternative NamesFoot spasms; Carpopedal spasm; Spasms of the hands or feet; Hand spasmConsiderationsSymptoms depend on the cause. They may include:CrampingFatigueMuscle weaknessNumbness, tingling, or a “pins and needles” feelingTwitchingUncontrolled, purposeless, rapid motionsNighttime leg cramps are common in the elderly.CausesCramps or spasms in the muscles often have no clear cause.Possible causes of hand or foot spasms include: Abnormal levels of electrolytes or minerals in the body Brain disorders, such as Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, dystonia, and Huntington disease Chronic kidney disease and dialysis Damage to a single nerve or nerve group (mononeuropathy) or multiple nerves (polyneuropathy) that are connected to muscles Dehydration (not having enough fluids in your body)Hyperventilation (overbreathing), which is rapid or deep breathing that can occur with anxiety or panicMuscle cramps, usually caused by overuse during sports or work activityPregnancy, more often during the third trimesterThyroid disordersToo little vitamin DUse of certain medicationsHome CareIf vitamin D deficiency is the cause, supplemental vitamin D should be taken under the doctors direction. Calcium supplements may also help.Being active helps keep muscles loose. Aerobic exercise, especially swimming, and strength building exercises are helpful. But care must be taken not to overdo activity, which can worsen the spasms.Drinking plenty of fluids during exercise is also important.When to Contact a Medical ProfessionalIf you notice recurrent spasms of your hands or feet, call your health care provider.advertisementWhat to Expect at Your Office VisitThe doctor or nurse will perform a physical exam and ask about your medical history and symptoms.Blood and urine tests may be done. Tests may include:Potassium, calcium and magnesium levelsHormone levelsKidney function testsVitamin D levels (25-OH vitamin D)Treatment depends on the cause of the spasms. For example, if they are due to a low level of vitamin D in your body, your doctor will likely recommend that you take a vitamin D supplement.ReferencesStein J. Spasticity. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2008:chap 144.Review Date:2/24/2014Reviewed By:Joseph V. Campellone, M.D., Division of Neurology, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.last_img read more

See More

15 days agoSouthampton manager Hasenhuttl loses another backroom staff member

first_imgSouthampton manager Hasenhuttl loses another backroom staff memberby Freddie Taylor15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveSouthampton manager Ralph Hasenhuttl has lost another member of his backroom staff.Hasenhuttl lost number two Danny Rohl to Bayern Munich two months ago.And now the club’s head of performance analysis Natasha Patel has joined New York Red Bulls.A statement on the Saints’ website reads: “Patel will oversee and expand the club’s use of analytics in areas including opponent scouting, game preparation and player evaluations from the Red Bulls First Team down through Red Bulls Academy.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img

See More

Kentucky’s Willie Cauley-Stein On Arkansas, “We Don’t Like That Team”

first_imgWillie Cauley Stein warms up for Kentucky.Prior to Sunday’s SEC Tournament championship game, Arkansas’ players did some trash talking to their opponent, Kentucky. They reportedly got in the Wildcats’ faces in a Bridgestone Arena tunnel and Razorbacks’ forward Bobby Portis said being able to play UK was like getting a wish granted. The fervor Arkansas’ players have for Kentucky is a feeling that is apparently replicated by the Wildcats’ players. Following his team’s victory against the Razorbacks, Kentucky junior center Willie Cauley-Stein said “we don’t like that team,” referencing Arkansas. Wow. Willie keeping it REAL. “We don’t like that team.” Said winning title was one thing, but they just wanted to beat “that team.”— Ashley Scoby (@AshleyScoby) March 15, 2015Willie Cauley-Stein after the game re: Arkansas, “Straight up, we don’t like that team.”— Brett Dawson (@BDawsonRivals) March 15, 2015Full WCS quote on not liking “that team” pic.twitter.com/EoGtkE2VTJ— Ashley Scoby (@AshleyScoby) March 15, 2015It’s not often that you see college basketball players openly discussing their dislike for another team, but we love it. Kentucky and Arkansas will learn their place in the NCAA Tournament at 6 p.m. E.T. on CBS.last_img read more

See More

As Franklins lure brings people north Gjoa Haven seeks its share of

first_imgGJOA HAVEN, Nunavut – It’s cool and cloudy as Don Sessions, wearing a toque and a good, solid jacket, hops off an inflatable boat that has ferried him from his cruise ship to shore.The welcoming facilities in Gjoa Haven, Nunavut, are primitive — a stretch of pebbly beach marked off with yellow police tape. Sessions and his fellow tourists will walk up a dusty dirt trail into town to stroll its dusty dirt roads.He’s having a ball.“I’m loving the trip,” says Sessions, a self-described Franklin Expedition nut who has travelled from St. Louis to visit the Arctic hamlet near the site of Sir John Franklin’s shipwrecks. “When you were a kid, this is what you dreamed about, if you dreamed about the North.”That’s music to Bob Cheetham’s ears.“It’s going to be huge,” says Cheetham, Gjoa Haven’s economic development officer. “There’s a lot of interest on the cruise ships now.”Sessions’ ship, the 166-passenger French-flagged Le Boreal, is one of six that will stop in Gjoa Haven during this year’s six-week season — two more ships than last year.Adventurous sailors are also coming. Gjoa (pronounced “Joe”) Haven’s pretty little bay had four yachts moored there at one point in August.“They’re buying groceries. They’re buying supplies. They’re buying fuel. They’re visiting our heritage facility here where a lot of the carvers have their stuff on exhibit and for sale,” Cheetham says.Franklin’s ships Erebus and Terror set out from England in 1845 with 129 men to search for the Northwest Passage, but they never returned.Gjoa is uniquely placed to take advantage of the discovery of the ships. It’s the closest community to where both the Erebus and the Terror finally went down.It’s an economic opportunity in a place that doesn’t have many of them and the community is making big plans to capitalize.The first-ever Umiyaqtutt (Inuktitut for “Shipwreck”) Festival — two weeks of dancing, community feasts and lectures from Parks Canada and Inuit experts — began Sept. 2.Then there’s an expansion of the local Nattilik Heritage Centre to include Franklin displays, expected to take a large share of the nearly $17 million budgeted by Ottawa in 2016 for conservation, research and presentation of the artifacts.Cheetham says new facilities for Gjoa’s highly regarded carvers and even tours to the Erebus site are also in the works.“It’s huge relative to what we had in the past, and it’s growing.”As well as Franklin, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen moored his ship here in 1903 and stayed for nearly two years. His ship was named the Gjoa.“You have the two British ships that didn’t survive and then you have Amundsen who made it through the Northwest Passage and into the Antarctic,” says Cheetham. “He did survive because he learned how to live with the people here — learned all the skills, all the clothing, how to stay alive.”It’s not hard to find people with fond family memories of Amundsen in Gjoa Haven.“We pass those stories on from generation to generation,” says Jimmy Arqviq, whose great-grandfather knew Amundsen.Cruise tourists are met by a local guide who shepherds them through a tightly scheduled program of local art, performances and traditional food. The tour costs $50 a head, which goes to pay guides and performers.Cheetham says figures on how much tourists spend while in the community are being developed.“Average spending has been low in the past off the cruise ships. But a lot of that’s about how we haven’t had the promotional stuff on the cruise ships in advance to prepare them for what they might be able to purchase here, and that’s changing.”The community is adding infrastructure such as ATM machines to make it easier for visitors to part with their money. Other communities report the average tourist leaves behind $90 on a shore visit.Gjoa Haven is remote and expensive to visit. It offers little in the way of amenities — restaurants, for example. But because it’s so small, even a little economic activity can go a long way.“Baby steps here,” says Cheetham. “We’re in the early stages of marketing and promotion.”But just as explorers charted the Northwest Passage little by little, Cheetham says their stories are slowly building an economy in the community at the heart of their adventures.“One thing builds on another.”last_img read more

See More

Resource firm planning new NB wells if Tories lift fracking moratorium

first_imgFREDERICTON — A major player in natural gas development in New Brunswick is making plans for new wells if the province’s new Tory government follows through on a pledge to lift a moratorium on fracking.Corridor Resources currently has 32 producing wells in the Sussex area and operates a 50 kilometre pipeline, a gathering system comprising 15 kilometres of pipe, and a natural gas processing facility.The company wants to expand but the previous Liberal government imposed a moratorium in 2014 that prohibits hydraulic fracturing — a process that involves pumping water and chemicals at high pressure to fracture shale rock and release gas.The new Tory government has proposed lifting the moratorium in specific areas, like the Sussex region, if there is public support.In a corporate presentation the company says, if the moratorium is lifted, they would drill five vertical evaluation wells, complete three existing wells, identify “sweet spots,” and drill a second round of up to five horizontal wells.The company says with the impending end of Nova Scotia’s offshore production, natural gas will have to come from outside the Maritimes if the New Brunswick deposit is not further developed.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

See More

Crews working to extinguish forest fire near the Site C Dam

first_imgThe smoke covering Fort St. John is coming from the fire that is currently uncontrolled.If the current fire suppression doesn’t work, more crews will be brought in to fight the fire Thursday.There is another fire northwest of Fort St. John, that is approximately 100 hectares in size.  The fire isn’t creating a lot of smoke today and crews are working to put out that fire.If you have any information about forest fires in our region, email news@moosefm.ca.  You can also send along any pictures or video as well. UPDATE as of 5:45 p.m. – B.C. Hydro has confirmed the fire is located approximately 3.5km upstream from the Site C Dam project.  At this time there is no concern for the workers on site or the worker accommodation.  Hydro and the B.C. Wildfire Service are monitoring the situation and their first priority is the safety of workers on site and the public.  Hydro was burning waste wood debris on Friday and Saturday near Tea Island.  The cause of Wednesday’s fire is unknown at this time.FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Crews from the Forest Fire Service and B.C. Hydro are working to contain a fire near the Site C Dam.The fire broke out on Wednesday and is approximately 4 hectares in size.  Crews from the Forest Service and B.C. Hydro are working to contain the fire and B.C. Hydro has hired a helicopter to help with the suppression efforts.last_img read more

See More

Northeast BC unemployment rate increased in January 2019

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The unemployment rate in Northeast B.C. saw an increase in January.The unemployment rate in January was 5.5 percent compared to 4.7 percent in December of 2018.January has been the highest recorded unemployment percentage since September 2018 at 5.6 percent, an estimated 39,900 people are employed in a labour force of 42,100. A recent statement made by Bruce Ralston, Minister of Jobs, Trade and Technology, on the release of the January Labour Force Survey from Statistics Canada;“As demonstrated in the newest results, higher wages, low unemployment and good jobs in British Columbia show that people are at the centre of our strong and stable economy.Wages continued to rise in January, with B.C. among the top provinces for year-over-year growth. In the past year, B.C.’s average wages grew by 4.1%, the highest among provinces. In fact, 2018 was B.C.’s highest annual wage growth in the past 10 years.B.C.’s unemployment rate remained the lowest in Canada — for the 17th month in a row — at 4.7%. Private sector jobs have been fuelling employment growth in the province, with an increase of 64,800 in the past year.This means people continue to see the benefit of a high-performing economy following many years of wage stagnation.”B.C.’s economy is expected to outperform the rest of Canada over the next three years. The Economic Forecast Council, a group of bank economists and analysts that are independent of government, estimates that B.C.’s real gross domestic product is expected to grow by 2.6% in both 2019 and 2020. “We’re working hard to nurture a sustainable economy that works for people.”last_img read more

See More

In highstate of preparedness to deal with threat from Pak

first_imgNew Delhi: The Indian Air Force on Thursday said it was in a high state of preparedness to pro-actively engage any perceived threat from Pakistan, in clear indication that underlying tension between the two countries remained.Citing a document of Pakistan’s civil aviation authority, the IAF said the neighbouring country has opened its airspace with Oman, Iran, Afghanistan and China only and the 11 entry and exit points located along Indo-Pak airspace were still closed. Also Read – How a psychopath killer hid behind the mask of a devout laity!”The Indian Air Force is in a high state of preparedness, to pro-actively engage any perceived threat in the present security scenario,” the IAF said in a statement. It said a strict vigil in the skies to detect and thwart any act of aggression from Pakistan Air Force is being maintained. Officials said all the frontline IAF bases along India’s western border have been kept on maximum alert. Tensions between the two countries escalated after Indian fighters bombed terror group Jaish-e-Mohammed’s biggest training camp near Balakot deep inside Pakistan on February 26. Pakistan retaliated by attempting to target Indian military installations on February 27. However, the IAF thwarted their plans. The Indian strike on the JeM camp came 12 days after the terror outfit claimed responsibility for a suicide attack on a CRPF convoy in Kashmir, killing 40 soldiers.last_img read more

See More

S Korean police apologise for 70yearold island massacre

first_imgSeoul: South Korean police apologised for the first time Wednesday over massacres that killed 10,000 people decades ago and the military expressed deep regret as President Moon Jae-in seeks to re-examine history. On April 3, 1948 members of the communist Workers’ Party of Southern Korea — an ally of the organisation that still rules the North — launched an armed uprising on the southern island of Jeju, attacking a dozen police stations. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US At the time the division of the peninsula had yet to be formalised and the Korean War was still two years away, but the US-supported South was ideologically split following the end of World War II and Japanese colonial rule. The revolt was quickly put down, but while sporadic clashes continued more than 10,000 civilians were killed by South Korean security forces over the next six years, including beyond the end of the Korean War. “We apologise to the innocent people whose lives were sacrificed,” said Min Gap-ryong, the commissioner general of the Korean National Police Agency, at a commemoration of the uprising’s 71st anniversary. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls “We promise to be an organisation that only thinks about and works for Korean citizens so that a tragedy like this will never repeat in our future.” The country’s defence ministry also expressed “deep regret” to the victims, while stopping short of a full apology. The Jeju Incident, as the events are known, remains a highly politicised issue in South Korea, as do some other aspects of the country’s post-war history. Some Jeju-based research and NGOs have claimed it was “Jeju people’s resistance against national division and ‘American Imperialism'”. The police apology and ministry’s expression of regret come after left-leaning South Korean President Moon Jae-in has repeatedly spoken on the importance of “setting our history right”. Moon, who brokered talks between Washington and Pyongyang, has stressed the independence struggle against Japan’s colonial rule is at the heart of national identity in both Koreas, while framing the South’s right-wing — who say the victims of Jeju were all communist rebels — as descendants of pro-Japanese collaborators. Last year, Moon became the first South Korean president in more than a decade to attend the annual memorial ceremony on Jeju. At the event he said: “Young people who were falsely accused of being communists during the April 3 Incident defended their country in the face of death. Ideology was nothing more than a cause that justified the massacre.” In 2003 the then South Korean president Roh Moo-hyun — whom Moon served as chief of staff — offered an apology to the victims of the Jeju incident.last_img read more

See More