Simeon Freeman to Slice Gov’t

first_imgMPC standard bearer, Simeon Freeman, believes the government of Liberia needs to be relieved of deadweight caused by certain ministries and agencies“My administration will reduce the number of ministries and agencies,” he saysSimeon Freeman, the political leader of the opposition Movement for Progressive Change (MPC), has been saying it since he first ran for president of Liberia in 2011: that, if elected, he would reduce the current size of the Liberian government from 82 to 22 ministries and agencies.Mr. Freeman reiterated his promise recently at the second regionalized presidential debate organized by Liberia Media for Democratic Initiatives and the Public Trust Media Group in Tubmanburg, Bomi County.He said government was spending over US$240 million annually on its workforce, because the ministries and agencies are overlapping the functions assigned to the other.Freeman said his idea to slice government ministries and agencies would enable his proposed administration to save significant amounts of money, which he intends to redeploy to empower the private sector.The President of Liberia cannot close down a ministry unilaterally; the decision requires a legislative procedure. For any ministry of government to be closed down, the President would need to communicate said desire to the Legislature, whose prerogative it would be to determine whether or not to endorse the President’s request. This will include the implications of how much it would cost the government to provide severance package for hundreds, if not thousands of civil servants affected by the closures.The MPC standard bearer said he would set up 30 private agricultural companies in the 15 counties to empower Liberian farmers. The companies, Freeman said, would intervene in the agriculture sector by providing implements and equipments, free of charge, to make the sector viable.Freeman noted that the companies would also add value to farmers’ products for export.He promised to direct some of government’s revenues to set up 200 factories, including corn oil producing plants.The factories, he said, would help to provide employment for 100,000 Liberians in his first 100 days in office.“Liberians don’t need college education or high school certificates to work in factories, but practical knowledge and commitment,” Freeman stated.He said Liberia has had bad leaders, “because of the criteria the citizens have set to elect a president, senators, and representatives.”He noted that many candidates have promised to develop the country, but have not said where they would get the money from to do so.Freeman said Liberians are not considering that it would be difficult to borrow money for Liberia from any international partner in the new government, “because the country is already indebted to multi-national firms.”Freeman claimed that under the President Johnson Sirleaf administration, 20 percent of Liberia’s forests have been cleared and shipped out of the country, in good faith, “but only that citizens are yet to feel the impact.”If elected in October, Freeman said he would use his expertise to mobilize money domestically, but did not say how he was going to achieve that objective.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Are mail-in rebates too much work?

first_img Put a value on your time. “I just got the last two of five rebates,” one reader wrote. “I had to make three trips back to the computer store, use loads of my own ink to copy everything, waste about a day on useless phone calls, and in general experience so much frustration I almost threw the printer out. Never again!” My recommendation: Determine whether you’re being “paid” enough for the time spent to claim the rebate. On my average pay, I would have made more money writing. Calculate your true savings. From the advertised rebate amount, subtract the costs you incur for postage, envelopes, printing and copying. And don’t forget sales tax. “One of the worst things about rebates is that you have to pay sales tax on money not actually spent on the product,” a reader wrote. (The tax is typically levied on the full purchase price, before the rebate is applied.) You are put off, put out and for the most part thoroughly disgusted. Some of you fight back. And a few – I hand it to you – seem to have licked the system and offer smart tips. I’m talking about the labyrinth of mail-in rebates, the often mind-numbing chore of finding, cutting out, putting together and mailing the required universal product codes, proofs of purchase and sales receipts, then waiting weeks, if not months, for rebate checks to start trickling in. And that’s without having to deal with claims you did not send a form you did submit, when it becomes your word against theirs. I wrote in January about my own rebate hassles on a computer purchase. In response, I’ve received upward of 200 e-mails from readers, most with their own horror stories. From these e-mails – more than on any other subject in years – I’ve gleaned the following observations and suggestions: Know the rules. “I’ve been notified several times that an original UPC (universal product code) was not included with my submission,” a reader wrote. “But this was not one of the terms.” This reader, who knew that the rules required only a copy, had the rebates validated on the spot over the phone. Ask about store policy on receipts before you part with originals. “I bought a cookware set, which included a mail-in rebate for $20,” a reader wrote. “One stipulation was to include the original receipt. I did get the rebate, but then two of the pots’ handles cracked. You guessed it. I couldn’t return the set because I didn’t have the original receipt.” If you must submit the original of anything, get written confirmation of when and to whom you sent it, and keep a copy. Several readers told me that, thanks to their documentation, they received rebates denied at first. But not everybody succeeds. “My rebate was refused because they said I did not send in the original receipt,” a reader wrote. “I knew I had, but they refused the copies. I gave up and just let the $60 go on a printer. I found that if you can wait and watch for sales, you may actually save some money” without a rebate. Complain all the way up. “I didn’t know whom to turn to after my rebate request was rejected and the representative at the toll-free number could give me only scripted answers,” a reader wrote. “I went directly to the retailer that sold me the product. The situation was resolved, but I still had lingering feelings so I went on to make a complaint to my State Attorney General’s office.” Well done. If you are getting the runaround on rebates, the Federal Trade Commission recommends you complain to the state Attorney General’s Office, local Better Business Bureau or the FTC. For more information on consumer issues, go to the FTC Web site www.ftc.gov or call toll-free, 877-FTC-HELP (877-382-4357).160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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