H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: No vaccine decision, cases near 6,500, low vaccine demand, flu research

first_imgMay 14, 2009WHO: No decision yet on H1N1 vaccine productionExperts convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) today made no decision on recommending mass production of a vaccine for the novel H1N1 virus, and how soon such a recommendation might come is uncertain, said Dr. Keiji Fukuda of the WHO. “No big decision, no pronouncements,” he told reporters. Calling the issue “enormously complicated,” he said a series of additional meetings will be needed. “It’s not possible to say a decision will be made by this [a specific] date,” he said.[May 14 WHO briefing audio file]Global novel influenza total tops 6,000The global number of novel H1N1 influenza cases reached 6,497 in 33 countries, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported today. The count includes 2,446 cases and 60 deaths in Mexico, 3,352 cases and 3 deaths in the United States as of yesterday, and 8 cases and 1 death in Costa Rica. Other countries with more than a dozen cases include Spain (100), the United Kingdom (71), Panama (29), and France (14).[WHO update 28]US novel flu cases pass 4,000Today the US tally of confirmed H1N1 cases grew to 4,298, of which 3 were fatal, in 47 states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported. North Dakota and Arkansas, with one case each, were added to the list of affected states today.[Current CDC numbers]WHO shortens upcoming World Health AssemblyThe WHO today announced a shortened schedule for the upcoming World Health Assembly. The WHO had been considering the move to allow more time for health ministers to address H1N1 issues in their own countries. The WHA starting date is still May 18, but the meeting will end on May 22 instead of May 27. The agenda includes pandemic preparedness, influenza virus sharing, the International Health Regulations, and WHO budgets and administration.[May 14 WHO statement]Poll finds low demand for potential new flu vaccineA Zogby/University of Texas poll found that only 30% of respondents would get a vaccine for the novel H1N1 outbreak if one was available. Only 18% saw the outbreak as a severe threat, and 96% said they have not curbed their visits to restaurants or malls. Forty percent were confident in the government’s ability to manage the outbreak. Only 36% of respondents said they received a flu immunization for the 2008-09 season. The online poll surveyed 1,442 adults between May 4 and 6.[May 13 Zogby press release]NIH renews support for Baylor flu vaccine researchThe Baylor Institute for Immunology Research recently announced that the National Institutes of Health renewed its grant, worth $14 million over the next 5 years, to design new influenza vaccines. The work involves molecules that target the immune system’s dendritic cells. The institute applied for a grant supplement to make a vaccine against the novel H1N1 virus.[May 11 Baylor press release]last_img read more

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Dan Straily will choose from 3 AL teams that will guarantee rotation spot, report says

first_imgHe will weigh his options over the next week or two and decide where he will sign after that. Other suitors could still emerge as well.Dan Straily has MLB offers and rotation spots assured with 3 AL teams and will take a week or two to decide which one to take (or another one that may surface in the interim). The Marlins let him go on the eve of the season.— Jon Heyman (@JonHeyman) March 29, 2019MORE: Watch ‘ChangeUp,’ a new MLB live whip-around show on DAZN Dan Straily has options.The 30-year-old starting pitcher has a guaranteed rotation spot from at least three American League teams, according to Fancred Sports. Straily was released by the Marlins on Monday just before the start of the regular season.He went 5-6 with a 4.12 ERA in 23 starts for Miami last season and has been remarkably consistent since coming into MLB in 2012.He is 42-36 with a 4.23 ERA in 142 career games (132 starts).last_img read more

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Senate passes bill making it easier to kill sea lions

first_imgSEATTLE — A bill that would make it easier to kill sea lions that feast on imperiled salmon in the Columbia River has cleared the U.S. Senate.State wildlife managers say rebounding numbers of sea lions are eating more salmon than ever and their appetites are undermining billions of dollars of investments to restore endangered fish runs.Senate Bill 3119, which passed Thursday by unanimous consent, would streamline the process for Washington, Idaho, Oregon and several Pacific Northwest Native American tribes to capture and euthanize potentially hundreds of sea lions found in the river east of Portland.Sen. Jim Risch, an Idaho Republican who co-sponsored the bill with senators from all three states, said the legislation would help ensure healthy populations of salmon for years to come.“As endangered salmon face extinction, we must take steps to protect them,” Sen. Maria Cantwell, a Washington Democrat, said in a statement.The Senate bill is similar to one passed by the U.S. House in June and sponsored by Reps. Jaime Herrera Beutler, a Washington Republican, Kurt Schrader, an Oregon Democrat, and others.last_img read more

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