Current, former Badgers gain valuable experience with Four Nations Cup

first_imgWith an off-weekend for most of the Wisconsin women’s hockey team, it has been an enjoyable past few days for head coach Mark Johnson and his players. While the team is still working hard, practice pace is a little slower, more jokes fly around, players flash smiles on the ice and a general easiness surrounds LaBahn Arena.However, almost 2,000 miles away, select Badgers are playing their absolute hardest for their respective countries as the 2014 Four Nations Cup gets underway. Wednesday night, the United States took on Canada, with five players representing University of Wisconsin. Among the Badgers taking part in the tournament are senior captain Blayre Turnbull and freshman Emily Clark, playing for Canada, along with freshman forward Annie Pankowski, playing for the United States.These players find themselves teammates for most of the year, but will face off against each other in a border battle that always breeds fierce competition. The United States-Canada rivalry has grown extremely fierce in recent years on both the men’s and women’s sides. Canada has bested the United States in the past two Olympic women’s hockey finals, and many American players feel the need to finally win on the international stage. Former Badgers Hilary Knight, Alex Rigsby and Brianna Decker will lead the United States in the tournament.Despite the intensity this rivalry brings, Johnson is not worried that the competition will cause any divide amongst Badgers of Canadian and American heritage.“[The Canadian and American players] have been in camps together, or on the same team, whether they were growing up or at respective colleges like here,” Johnson said. “Once the puck drops and Canada is playing the United States, Clark and Pankowski are going to do things to help their respective teams and if they bump into each other, that’s just part of hockey. When the game is over and they’re flying back they’re teammates again, friends again.”Johnson touched on the strong bond his players have, which he believes a national team game can’t break. Instead of worrying about possible tensions that could arise from such a fierce rivalry, Johnson created a program in which no such rivalry can break the camaraderie. He has no reason to worry, and instead commends his players for their hard work and skills.“That’s the fun part of competing at this level,” Johnson said. “You have the chance to play for your country and, uniquely, you get a chance to play against one of your teammates, and it is quite an experience.”Regardless of whichever nation finds victory, the Badgers can only benefit from sending players to compete at the international level. Which could be just the spark the team needs after a slightly disappointing series this past weekend at North Dakota.The Badgers tied 3-3 against UND last Friday and squeaked out a 3-2 win Saturday to finish the series. Leading goal-scorer Brittany Ammerman tallied her fifth and sixth goals of the season and Sarah Nurse scored twice. While many offensive leaders are playing well, one statistic stands out among the rest.The Badgers outshot UND 40-21 Friday and 31-17 Saturday, prompting one to question why each game ended so closely when the Badgers heavily outshot their opponents. As Johnson pointed out, there is a very rational conclusion. With Pankowski, Clark and Turnbull all missing due to the Four Nations Cup, the Badgers were missing some major points and morale leaders on the ice, showing just how invaluable they are to the team.Another point to be taken away, as Johnson explained, is the added depth the Badgers have this year.“Under the circumstances, I thought we played very well,” Johnson said. “We were missing three of our top forwards on Friday, four on Saturday, so we had a gutty effort and came away with a tie and a win. I was very pleased.”The Badgers depth was on display against No. 1o North Dakota, which could mean big things for Wisconsin as the season progresses. When Turnbull, Pankowski and Clark return to Madison with their invaluable experience, Wisconsin’s depth will only increase. The offensive production should follow closely behind.last_img read more

See More

PAHO/WHO Urges Northern Hemisphere Countries to Prepare for Heatwaves

first_imgWashington, D.C. (PAHO) – In view of the current heatwaves in Europe and predictions that this phenomenon will hit various parts of the Americas, the Pan American Health Organization/ World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) is urging countries in the North American, Central American and Caribbean region to be prepared for heatwaves, due to the impact that this could have on peoples’ health, including the risk of death.The heatwaves that have had the greatest impact since 2000 were the one in Brazil in 2010 that caused the death of 737 people, and the one in Argentina in the summer of 2013-2014 that caused 1,877 deaths and left 800,000 people with no power, which increased heat stress in that population. According to health authorities in the United States, heatwaves are the natural phenomenon that caused the highest number of deaths in that country.Weather forecasts for North America, Central America and the Caribbean (the Region) predict heat waves during the summer of 2019. This could increase drought-induced stress, lead to forest fires, and have harmful effects on human health.Contingency plans to address heatwaves Due to the situation, PAHO has developed a guide to help countries in the Region formulate contingency plans to address heatwaves. This guide provides recommendations that the health sector and meteorological agencies can implement to prepare for and better respond to this threat, promote health, prevent the adverse effects of heatwaves, treat affected people, and save lives.The document stresses that heatwave contingency plans should be able to determine the extent of the threat, with alert activation procedures, a description of roles and functions, and intra- and inter-agency coordination mechanisms.The document also highlights that countries should strengthen the epidemiological surveillance of heat-related morbidity and mortality, the capacity of health services (training of staff, improvements in the design of new hospitals, and equipping of existing hospitals in high-risk areas), and enhance the actions of local authorities, the media, and communities in terms of inter-agency response measures, prevention measures, and self-care. The impact of heatwaves on health Exposure to heat causes severe symptoms such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke (a condition which causes faintness, as well as dry, warm skin, due to the inability of the body to control high temperatures). The majority of heat-related deaths are due to the worsening of cardiopulmonary, renal, endocrine and psychiatric conditions. Other symptoms include edema in the lower limbs, heat rash on the neck, cramps, headache, irritability, lethargy and weakness.People with chronic diseases that take daily medications have a greater risk of complications and death during a heatwave, as do older people and children.Reactions to heat depend on each person’s ability to adapt and serious effects can appear suddenly. This is why it is important to pay attention to the alerts and recommendations of local authorities.Preventing the harmful effects of heatStay tuned to weather alerts and forecasts.Avoid sun exposure between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.Do not leave children or older persons in parked vehiclesDo not exercise or engage in intense outdoor activities without proper protectionDrink water every 2 hours, even if you aren’t thirsty.Keep the home cool by covering windows during the day and using air conditioners or fans during the hottest hours.If you have a chronic disease and take drugs, consult your doctor. What to do if there are signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion or heat stroke:Heatstroke is a life-threatening medical emergency. The individual should receive medical care in a hospitalStop all physical activity.Call an ambulance immediately.Go to or move the affected person to a cool site.Use any physical means to facilitate cooling (such as cooling the head and body down with water and fanning the person to reduce their temperature).Warning signs in moderate and severe cases:Heat exhaustion:Heavy sweatingCool, pale skinTemperature < 40º CDizziness or faintnessHeadacheRapid breathingWeak, rapid pulse Heatstroke:Red, hot, and dry skinTemperature > 40ºCThrobbing headacheUnconscious or in a comaRapid, strong pulselast_img read more

See More

Sumner County Sheriff weekly jail bookings: June 20-27, 2016

first_imgPhillips, Joseph M.18Clearwater, KS200 W. 4th, Belle Plaine, KSBPPDDriving under influence, Possession of Opiates, Use/possess drug  paraphernalia6/25/16 Nasworthy, Kelsey N.24Oxford, KS1693 E. 80th St., Oxford, KSSUSOIgnition interlock device/Failure to yield;Interference with LEO; Attempted driving while license cancelled6/20/16 Goldring, Steven D49Wichita, KSSedgwick County JailSGSOAggravated Buglary; Theft of property6/24/16 Grayson, Cleveland Jr.47Wichita, KS610 E. Hillside, Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence6/20/16 Black, Alfred L. Jr.40Wellington, KS501 N. Washington, Wellington, KSSUSOProbation Violation6/21/16 Childers, Rusty L.37Wichita, KSSedgwick County JailSGSOFailure to Appear6/24/16 Ledbetter, Darien S.22Wellington, KS610 E. Hillside, Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence6/22/16 Schoen, Cody J.34Wichita, KSEl Dorado Prison, El Dorado, KSSUSOProbation Violation6/22/16 Matthews, Aaron W.27Mulvane, KS1467 N. Easy Rd., Mulvane, KSSUSOCriminal Threat; Crim damage to property6/21/16 Holt, William L.32Wichita, KS1-35 MP 25.7, Wellington, KSKHPCriminal Damage to Property; Battery6/21/16 Johnston, James D.66Wichita, KSSedgwick County JailSGSOFailure to Appear6/22/16 White, Roger W.30Arkansas City, KSRadio Ln and 8th St., Arkansas City, KSMPDFailure to Appear6/22/16 Spaulding, Robert A.24Wichita, KSS 1-35 MM16, Wellington, KSKHPDriving while license cancelled6/21/16 Mabrey, Ryan P,40Neosho, MO300 Block of W US160, Wellington, KSKHPProbation Violation6/26/16 Rapier, Stephen L.67Peck, KS610 E. Hillside, Wellington, KSSUSOTheft of property; Deceptive commercial practice6/22/16 Cook, Rachel E.26Wellington, KS1030 W. College St., Wellington, KSWPDDomestic Battery6/22/16 Villarreal, Zion42Kearney, NBS 1-35 MM 5, South Haven, KSKHPDriving under influence, Operate4 a motor vehicle without valid license6/25/16 Stewart, Caleb D.28Wellington, KS2022 E. 16th, Wellington, KSWPDCriminal Trespass6/26/16 Slack, Keith E.48Wellington, KS129 S. Glendale Rd, Wellington, KSSUSOBattery6/23/16 Garmon, Lindsey A.31Wellington, KS2022 E. 16th, Wellington, KSWPDTheft6/20/16         Rivas, Gabriel Jr.35Wichita, KSSedgwick County JailSUSOProbation Violation6/23/16 NAMEAGEHOMETOWNLOCATION OF ARRESTAGENCYCHARGESARREST DATE Deluna, Alexia19Fort Worth, TXI-35 MP 10KHPFailure to Appear6/23/16 Mejia, Jose R.29Belle Plaine, KS419 N. Logan, Belle Plaine, KSBPPDRape; Sexual intercourse with physically powerless victim; Eavesdropping; Install/use concealed camcorder without consent6/22/16 Herbst, Ruston W.48Enid, OK401 S. Main, Argonia, KSSUSOFailure to Appear6/24/16 Asbury, Christopher A22Wellington, KS501 N. Washington, Wellington, KSSUSOProbation Violation6/21/16 Sumner Newscow report — The Sumner County Sheriff Office report for June 20 to June 27, 2016 weekly jail bookings are as follows: Pettegrew, Tanya41Arkansas City, KS501 N. Washington, Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence6/24/16 Chappell, Charles V.33Wellington, KS918 N. Washington, Wellington, KSSUSOProbation Violation6/24/16 Banister, Monty J.18Wellington, KS800 E. 90th, Belle Plaine, KSSUSODriving while license cancelled6/25/16 Smithson, Ryan J.40Augusta, KSHutchinson, Correctional FacilitySUSOFailure to Appear6/22/16 Chisholm, Kylee J.23Wellington, KS102 W. Apple Blossom, Wellington, KSWPDFailure to Appear6/24/16 Gurley, Aaron T.28Wellington, KS224 S. Jefferson, Wellington, KSWPDFailure to Appear6/25/16 Cook, Ashton L.24Wichita, KSChase County JailSUSOProbation Violation6/23/16 Tran, Hoa V.53Wichita, KS400 Blk. W. Main, Oxford, KSOxford PDViolate Protection Order6/26/16 Monday 0600  to  Monday 0600  WEEKLY   BOOKINGS 6/20/2016 thru 6/27/2016  Harrison, Evan C.19Wichita, KS1300 K15, Mulvane, KSSUSODriving while license cancelled; Failure to appear; Probation Violation6/23/16 Jackson, Joseph S.37Wellington, KS610 E. Hillside, Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence6/25/16 Davis, Isaac L.24Anthony, KS100 W. US HWY, Wellington, KSSUSODriving While Suspended6/26/16 Follow us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more

See More

Banned Istanbul Pride march goes ahead confined to one street

first_imgGAYSTARNEWS- Pride Istanbul: Confined, but going ahead. Photo: Andrew Gardner, Amnesty IntlThe Turkish capital’s planned Pride march was banned by the city’s governor’s office, late last week, citing security concerns.Andrew Gardner of Amnesty International in Turkey told Gay Star News that the organizers of the event had received last minute permission from the police, but only for the crowd to remain in the one street where they had gathered.Gardner tweeted pictures of crowds gathered in Mis Sokak, a street popular with LGBTI people in Istanbul near the main Taksim Square.Riot police presence could spell trouble laterAlthough corralled into one street, the sizeable crowd were loud and noisy and in good spirits. However, the event has only just started and there is a heavy police presence in place. Several people have posted comments on Twitter about minor ‘interventions’ with some marchers and riot police. Pride Istanbul: Confined, but going ahead. Photo: Andrew Gardner, Amnesty Intl Read the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/istanbul-pride-march-goes-ahead-but-confined-to-one-street/ eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us)center_img A banned LGBTI Pride march in Istanbul has been granted permission to go ahead by police, as long as marchers remain confined to just one street. German politician and MEP, Terry Reintke, posted a video clip on Twitter saying ‘Despite the tension the atmosphere is amazing. #IstanbulPride.’Despite the tension the atmosphere is amazing.#IstanbulPride pic.twitter.com/1NhivqgRsJ— Terry Reintke (@TerryReintke) July 1, 2018Last week it issued a statement saying that the ban that the move was discriminatory and illegitimate.“This march is organized in order to fight against the violence and discrimination fueled by that governorship decision,” the organizer said.“We would like to inform the press and the public that we will go ahead with our prideful march with the same ambition as we had before.”Gay pride parades have been banned in Istanbul for the last three years.Homosexuality is not a crime in Turkey, but there is widespread hostility to it across Turkish society.Civil liberties in the mostly muslim country have been tightly controlled by the government following an attempted military coup in July 2016.Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading…last_img read more

See More