What we learned from Syracuse’s 80-56 victory over Cornell

first_img Published on December 28, 2016 at 12:14 am Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Facebook Twitter Google+ Here are three things we learned from the game.Tyus Battle has established himself as clear-cut starterBattle has been receiving treatment for a minor injury to his left foot, which had limited his minutes. Since his first career start against North Florida and starting the next two games, Battle played only 12, 23 and 22 minutes, respectively. He had been held to eight or fewer points in two of Syracuse’s last three outings.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn his first start since Dec. 10, Battle shined against the Big Red. He posed a threat shooting from the perimeter and on penetrating in the lane. He left the locker room wearing a brace, but said his foot’s “feeling 100 percent.”“I’m feeling a lot more comfortable getting to the basket, which I wasn’t earlier on,” Battle said.The freshman point guard scored 16 points on 5-of-11 shooting from the floor and 4-of-7 from 3-point range. He made both of his free throws, grabbed three rebounds and had three steals in 32 minutes.“He did a little bit of everything,” fifth-year guard Andrew White said. “He did a better job of getting to the rim tonight, which set up his jump shot. He got in there, got some layups, got some transitions stuff, free throws, and that kind of opened up his 3-pointers.”Despite blowout win, Jim Boeheim still has “no idea” where Syracuse stands right nowAfter Syracuse’s blowout loss to St. John’s last Wednesday, SU head coach Jim Boeheim bluntly assessed his own coaching.“I don’t think I (know what I’m doing) with this team because they’re not doing what we need to win,” Boeheim said Dec. 21.After SU’s blowout win over Cornell, Boeheim echoed similar sentiments.“I have no idea. No idea,” he said when asked where Syracuse now stands ahead of Atlantic Coast Conference play, set to begin Sunday at Boston College.“We’ve got a lot of work to do,” he added. “Tonight was a baby, baby step that doesn’t really mean much. But we’ve got to get ready, when we have some time, try to use it constructively and play a little better.”Tyler Roberson can jumpstart the offense, even if it’s only one or two big playsMinutes after he subbed into Tuesday’s game, Tyler Roberson leapt for a floating rebound and threw down a vicious put-back dunk. The senior forward’s slam sparked a dominating SU run that ended the first half. Then point guard John Gillon, who led all players with seven assists, fed Roberson on an alley-oop that put an exclamation point on Syracuse’s first half as the clock expired.“He was the Tyler we know,” said Thompson.The freshman forward referenced the Roberson of last season’s NCAA Tournament, during which he averaged 8.6 points and 11.2 rebounds per game. But this season, Roberson has hardly contributed. He had scored more than one point in just four of Syracuse’s previous nine games and didn’t even attempt a shot in six minutes during SU’s loss to Georgetown. In Syracuse’s last outing against St. John’s, he went just 0-for-3 from the field.Tuesday against Cornell, however, Roberson threw down two first-half dunks, dished out two assists and blocked two shots. He challenged several others as well, resulting in SU rebounds.“I thought Tyler Roberson gave us a really good first half,” Boeheim said. Then he paused. “A really good (first half), then nothing. But he gave us a really good first half.” Commentscenter_img Six days after Syracuse suffered its worst-ever loss in Carrier Dome history, a 93-60 defeat to St. John’s, the Orange cruised by Cornell (3-9) Tuesday night in the Carrier Dome. SU dominated inside, scoring more points near the basket than it has in any game since opening night, save for its blowout victory over Eastern Michigan last week. Tyler Lydon scored 20 points and grabbed 10 rebounds, Taurean Thompson poured in 18 and Tyus Battle added 16 to pace the Orange.MORE COVERAGESyracuse men’s basketball uses its size advantage to dominate Cornell, 80-56, in final nonconference gameGraphical breakdown of Syracuse men’s basketball’s 80-56 victory over CornellSyracuse fans react to SU’s 24 point victory over Cornelllast_img read more

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Top NASCAR drivers vow in video to push for ‘real change’ on racial issues

first_imgMORE: Wallace appears to pass out in postrace interviewThe drivers’ Zoom-style video was similar in style to a video made Thursday by prominent black NFL players who called on the league to make a stronger statement against police brutality and racism than the one it issued May 30 on behalf of commissioner Roger Goodell. Goodell responded Friday with a video statement that gave the players most of what they wanted .The drivers’ full statement:”We’re no strangers to moving fast and we know how life can have that same quality, but now is the time to slow down and reflect.”The events of recent weeks highlighted the work we still need to do as a nation to condemn racial inequality and racism. The deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and countless others in the black community are heartbreaking and can no longer be ignored.”The process begins with us listening and learning, because understanding the problem is the first step in fixing it. We are committed to listening with empathy and with an open heart to better educate ourselves. We will use this education to advocate for change in our nation, our communities and, most importantly, in our own homes, even after the headlines go away.”All of our voices, they make a difference, no matter how big or how small. It is all of our responsibility to no longer be silent.”We have a long road ahead of us, but let’s commit to make that journey together. Our differences should not divide us. It is our love for all mankind that will unite us as we work together to make real change.” Bubba Wallace, the lone black driver in the NASCAR Cup Series, and Dale Earnhardt Jr. also were shown reading portions of the statement.Last week, Wallace spoke of his experiences with racial injustice last week on Earnardt’s podcast. Earnhardt later praised Wallace’s leadership in educating him and active drivers.Wallace made an individual statement on the track before Sunday’s Folds of Honor Quikrip 500 at Atlanta Motor Speedway — wearing a T-shirt the bore the words “I Can’t Breathe” and “Black Lives Matter.”George Floyd told former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, “I can’t breathe,” as Chauvin held his knee against Floyd’s neck for more than eight minutes on May 25 while Floyd was in police custody for alleged forgery. Floyd later died. His death ignited protests and rioting around the world. Chauvin, who was fired, has been charged with second-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. NASCAR’s top drivers have added their voices to calls for racial equality in the United States.Kevin Harvick, Kyle and Kurt Busch, Jimmie Johnson, Chase Elliott, Brad Keselowski, Denny Hamlin, Martin Truex Jr. and Joey Logano were just a few of the drivers to commit to “listening and learning” and pledge to “advocate for change in our nation, our communities and, most importantly, in our own homes.”last_img read more

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