Mother Emily Gibson Parson’s Funeral Today

first_imgThe funeral of Mother Emily Louise Gibson Parsons, a prominent Liberian nurse of yesteryear, is scheduled to take place today at the St. Peter Episcopal Church, Caldwell.According to her granddaughter, Counselor Althea E. Sherman, the body will be removed from the Samuel Stryker Funeral Home at 8 o’clock this morning and taken to St. Peter in Caldwell, where wake keeping will start at 10 o’clock a.m. The funeral service will start at 11 o’clock a.m. Mother Gibson-Parsons died on December 4 at the Caldwell home of her daughter, Caldwell Commissioner Rev. Alexine Mendscole Howard.The nonagenarian was in her 99th year.A graduate of the Julia C. Emery Hall, Bromley Mission, Mother Parsons later obtained nursing training and became one of Liberia’s renowned nurses from Caldwell. She was one of the first nurses at the Liberian Government Hospital on Ashmun Street, Snapper Hill, Monrovia, serving under Dr. Dingwall. Mother Parsons later joined the Liberian Mining Company (LMC), working in the pharmacy and later became head of the dispensary unit. She thereafter returned to the Liberian Government Hospital and worked at the Maternity Center. She opened and headed the first clinic in the Township of Caldwell and ran it for 25 consecutive years but left because of the Liberian civil war.Mrs. Parsons was born in Caldwell, Montserrado County on June 7, 1918 to the union of Senator John Clement Alexander Gibson, Sr. and Mrs. Eliza Prichard Wilson, also of Caldwell. Emily received her early education at the Saint Peter’s Episcopal School in the Township of Caldwell and graduated from the Julia C. Emery Hall, Bromley Mission in Clay Ashland, Montserrado County. She was baptized at an early age and became a member of St. Peter’s where she was awarded several certificates for hard work. She was a member of Queen Esther Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star. During the 165th Independence Day Celebration of Liberia, President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, as Grand Master of the Order of Distinctions of the Republic, conferred upon Mother Parsons the Grand Band, Order of the Star of Africa-Nonagenarian.Mother Parsons’ survivors include her children, Commissioner and Pastor, Alexine Marina Mends-Cole Howard; Mr. Benoni A. Parsons (Fatima); Ms. Emily Karen Parsons; Mrs. Florence Neufville (Christian); Ms. Minty Mends-Cole; grand children Mrs. Althea Emily Eastman Sherman; Bernadine Lavern Eastman; Mrs. Freda Alexzene Eastman; Mrs. Debra Jane Eastman Oladosu (Vance); Daphane Edwina Eastman; Candace Blachamka Eastman; Benedict Arma Parsons (Precious); Benoni A. Parsons, Jr. (Tina); Bennett Ahmed Parsons; Rachel Bentima Parsons; Mrs. Legendre Parsons Carter (Christina); Julius Tonia Coleman; Velma King and Shirley.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Ramelton mast concerns heighten after planning application is lodged

first_imgThe planning process has formally started for the erection of a controversial 30metre telecoms mast in Drumonaghan Wood in Ramelton.But some local residents are fearful about the proposals due to a ‘lack of transparency’ on the impact the mast may have on the locality.Cignal Infrastructure Ltd formally lodged the planning application with Donegal County Council on Friday to seek permission to erect a new 30m multi-user telecommunications support structure. The mast would be located within a security compound in the woods and surrounded by a 2.4m high palisade fence. It comes as independent company Cignal last year revealed that they are investing €25M into building telecoms infrastructure in Ireland to improve broadband and mobile coverage blackspots in rural areas.Cllr Ian McGarvey attempted to bring an emergency motion to the Letterkenny-Milford District meeting yesterday to discuss the proposed mast in Ramelton.However, he was told that the motion could not be discussed.“The motion is in relation to a current planning application that is before the council,” said Liam Ward, Director of Services. “Any discussion could be determined prejudicial to the consideration of the planning application and should not happen.”An online petition is also underway calling on the council to oppose the development.The public has five weeks to make written submissions on the application to the planning authority.Ramelton mast concerns heighten after planning application is lodged was last modified: September 17th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Flies Turn on a Dime

first_img51; A fly can turn 180 degrees in one tenth the time it takes you to blink an eye.  Beating their wings 250 times a second, they don’t even have to think about each wing beat, PhysOrg said about studies at Brown University using high-speed cameras and image tracking software.  “[Attila] Bergou discovered that flies rely less on their brains than previously thought and more on the clever design of their wings,” the article said.  “To make a turn, a fly simply twitches a muscle that rolls its shoulder slightly.  The wing does the rest, naturally adjusting over the course of a few beats, tilting by about 9 degrees, and creating drag forces that wheel the insect around.”  The article includes a 32-second video clip that allows you to watch the turn in slow motion.    The U-turn of the fly is much faster than anything man-made can achieve.  A scientist at Harvard is looking enviously at the fly, the article said, for envisioning electrical flying robots that may some day come close to matching the fly’s design specifications.Evolution makes sense when you think in generalities.  When you look at things in detail, and measure what is required to make them function, you start thinking in terms of design specifications.  You want to imitate them.  When you try to imitate them, and find out how hard it is, you become an intelligent design believer.  Darwinian excuses like, “Evolution had a million year head start,” begin to sound like desperate question-begging attempts to hang onto an obsolete dogma that has lost its credibility in the details.(Visited 39 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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