With a lead in Pennsylvania, Biden nears victory in the state and the election.

first_imgMr. Trump has baselessly insisted that post-Election Day tallies showing Mr. Biden leading in battleground states, including Pennsylvania, were the result of fraud, and has vowed to challenge them in court. His campaign showed no sign of an imminent concession Friday morning. “The false projection of Joe Biden as the winner is based on results in four states that are far from final,” a lawyer for the Trump campaign said in a statement.Mayor Jim Kenney of Philadelphia dismissed those accusations on Friday.“While some including the President continue to spew baseless claims of fraud, claims for which his team has not produced one iota of evidence, what we have seen here in Philadelphia is democracy, pure and simple,” Mr. Kenney said.Andrew Bates, a spokesman for the Biden campaign, said that if Mr. Biden won the election and Mr. Trump refused to concede, “The United States government is perfectly capable of escorting trespassers out of the White House.” Mr. Biden had steadily erased Mr. Trump’s early lead in the state — at one point, the president led by half a million votes — as ballots, mostly absentee and mail-in votes, were counted over the past few days. Most of the remaining uncounted votes in the state are in Democratic-leaning areas.At a news conference on Friday afternoon, Philadelphia elections officials said that they would have another update of 2,000 to 3,000 ballots on Friday afternoon, and that they had about 40,000 ballots left to count in the city. “We believe when the votes are counted, it’s pretty clear that Joe Biden’s going to be president of the United States, because he’s going to win Pennsylvania,” said State Senator Sharif Street, the vice chair of the state Democratic Party, on Thursday. PHILADELPHIA — Joseph R. Biden Jr. took the lead over President Trump in Pennsylvania on Friday morning as Democrats grew increasingly confident that he would win the state and with it the presidency: The state’s 20 electoral votes would put Mr. Biden, who has 253 electoral votes, past the 270-vote threshold for victory.By late Friday morning, after more votes were counted from Philadelphia and other counties that have supported Mr. Biden, he led Mr. Trump by more than 13,000 votes.- Advertisement – The remaining ballots “generally fall into one of three categories: those that require a review, provisionals and U.S. military overseas ballots,” said Lisa Deeley, one of the city commissioners in Philadelphia in charge of elections. “I would estimate there’s approximately 40,000 remaining to be counted.”- Advertisement – “We can also tell you that it may take several days to complete the reporting of that,” Ms. Deeley added.On Thursday, Kathy Boockvar, the Pennsylvania secretary of state, told CNN that the “overwhelming majority” of the state’s remaining votes would be counted by Friday. Pennsylvania Democratic officials have said their analysis of the uncounted votes gave them confidence that Mr. Biden would win the state by a substantial margin.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Make Everyone Great Again world-uniting apparel encourages harmony among everyone » Gadget Flow

first_img– Advertisement – No matter where you live, you’ve probably experienced disunity in your community. And it’s like that worldwide. That’s why the Make Everyone Great Again world-uniting apparel wants to promote peace and harmony. A collection of five different shirts and three different hats, this world-uniting apparel spreads the messages of goodness and kindness. Sure, you’ll benefit from a cool new piece of clothing, but it will also benefit all 7.8 billion people on the planet by promoting goodwill. The shirts have phrases on them that say Mask Please and Unite the World, and the hats read Keep Everyone Great and Make Everyone Great Again. There’s a lot of suffering in the world. But now’s your chance to spread a positive message with the Make Everyone Great Again collection.last_img read more

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Food handlers’ gloves may not mean cleaner food

first_img They also say that food managers and workers prefer to use gloves because glove use is easier to monitor than handwashing is. However, “It has often been found that glove use provides a false sense of security because food handlers misuse gloves or neglect washing their hands when gloves are worn,” the article concludes. Overall, testing showed coliform bacteria on 6.5% (24 of 359) of samples for which data were complete. The coliform rate for samples prepared with gloved hands was 9.6%, versus 4.4% for samples handled without gloves. Though the sample was too small to show a significant difference, each of the two rates fell outside the other’s 95% confidence interval, which suggests that a true difference is not unlikely, the report says. Gloves were used on 93% of 172 samples collected in Kansas, where gloves are required by state law, but on only 5% of 191 samples collected in Oklahoma, where they are not, the report says. “Overall, the results of this study suggest that use of gloves by food handlers does not reduce bacterial contamination of foods and might even increase the risk of microbial contamination,” says the report by Robert A. Lynch and colleagues at the University of Oklahoma Department of Occupational and Environmental Health in Oklahoma City. Testing of flour tortillas bought at about 140 fast-food restaurants in Tulsa, Okla., and Wichita, Kan., showed that those handled by gloved workers were more than twice as likely to have coliform bacteria on them as were those handled by gloveless workers, the report says. However, the number of samples was not large enough to make the difference statistically significant. A finding of coliform bacteria (a general term for intestinal microbes) indicates that pathogenic bacteria could be present. The authors write that the higher coliform bacteria rate associated with gloves suggests that food workers were not using gloves properly. “We observed several instances in which previously used gloves were reused, and we never observed glove wearers changing gloves in the midst of food preparation,” they state. “Given the levels of surface bacteria that have been reported in food service settings, it is not surprising that organisms were transferred to the food that were tested.”center_img The researchers found low rates of contamination when they tested for particular bacterial species: 0.3% (1 of 371 samples) for Escherichia coli, 2.2% (8 of 371) for Staphylococcus aureus, and 0.5% (2 of 371) for Klebsiella species. The investigators did not actually count bacterial organisms, however. No potentially pathogenic microbes were found on the unopened tortilla samples. Lynch RA, Phillips ML, Elledge BL, et al. A preliminary evaluation of the effect of glove use by food handlers in fast food restaurants. J Food Prot 2005;68(1):187-90 [Abstract] The researchers collected 371 flour tortillas at restaurants from four fast-food chains in the two cities and tested them for bacteria. When ordering the food, the investigators observed whether or not the workers wore gloves, among other details. The researchers also collected 82 unopened packages of tortillas from the four chains and tested them to assess the background level of bacteria present before handling. Feb 7, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – The use of gloves by fast-food restaurant workers might be expected to result in cleaner food, but that isn’t necessarily the case, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Food Protection.last_img read more

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US import safety panel calls for risk-based monitoring

first_img Mike Leavitt, secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), led the investigation and presented the report to the president on Sep 10. In a letter that accompanied the report, Leavitt wrote that the United States must shift from a “snapshot” approach of stopping unsafe products at the border to a “video” model that identifies critical points in an imported product’s life cycle. Because state and federal agencies don’t use integrated information-sharing systems, crucial information on imports is sometimes missed, the report says. For example, the US Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) import inspection data system is not connected to the system used by US Customs and Border Protection (CBP). Jun 28 CIDRAP News story “Drugs in Chinese seafood trigger FDA import ban” Sep 12, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – A cabinet-level working group assigned by President Bush in July to explore import safety issues issued its initial report recently, suggesting a risk-based monitoring strategy and calling on government agencies to use technology to improve collaboration on import-related activities. Bush’s actions were prompted by several recent product safety problems that surfaced over the summer and involved Chinese imports. Food-related incidents involved melamine-contaminated wheat gluten that was used in animal and fish feed, and seafood that contained residues of unauthorized veterinary drugs. See also: Another challenge that government officials need to address is companies and individuals that circumvent US restrictions on certain imports. For example, the working group found that in 2006 CBP intercepted 45 containers of chicken, chicken parts, and other meat products that were smuggled into the country as frozen seafood. Leavitt said in his letter that over the next several weeks the working group will gather comments and recommendations from the public. In mid November the group will follow up with an action plan that will contain several short- and long-term recommendations. “Such a risk-based, prevention-focused model will help ensure that safety is built into products before they reach our borders,” Leavitt wrote. “This lack of connectivity between CBP and USDA systems has created the possibility, which is now being addressed, for imported products to enter domestic commerce without being inspected in accordance with federal requirements,” the report states. Jul 20 CIDRAP News story “FAO, WHO urge vigilance in light of recent food scares”last_img read more

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Indonesia reports new H5N1 death

first_imgAug 4, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – An official from Indonesia’s health ministry recently confirmed that a 19-year-old man died from an H5N1 avian influenza infection.Nyoman Kandun, director general of communicable diseases at the health ministry, said the man died last week in a hospital west of Jakarta, according to an Aug 2 report from the Associated Press (AP).The man, a cargo worker, died in Tangerang, a suburb of Jakarta, Xinhua, China’s state news agency, reported yesterday. If his death and another reported last month are confirmed by the World Health Organization (WHO), the man would be listed as Indonesia’s 137th H5N1 case and its 112th death.Media reports gave no details about the source of the man’s infection or whether his personal contacts have undergone medical evaluation.The confirmation of the man’s death by an Indonesian health official appears to deviate from the country’s recent policy of foregoing official announcement of H5N1 cases as they occur, opting instead for periodic updates. In early June, health minister Siti Fadilah Supari said the country would announce cases at longer intervals, perhaps as long as 6 months, according to previous reports.Though Indonesia’s stance appears to raise questions about its compliance with International Health Regulations, WHO officials have said its relationship with the country remains good and that the delay in reporting has not hampered the ability to conduct joint investigations into Indonesian H5N1 cases.Healthcare workers and family members alerted the media about Indonesia’s last H5N1 case, that of a 38-year-old man who reportedly died on Jul 10. However, a health ministry spokeswoman declined to confirm the case and said officials would release the information in an H5N1 case update at the end of July. No updates appear to have been posted on the government’s health ministry or avian influenza Web sites.Also, it’s not clear if Indonesia has notified the WHO about the two cases. The WHO has not yet confirmed the illness and death of either man, so for now the group still lists Indonesia’s case count as 135 cases and 110 deaths. Indonesia leads the world with the most H5N1 cases and fatalities.The WHO’s world H5N1 count stands at 385 human cases and 245 deaths.See also:Jun 5 CIDRAP News story “Indonesia quits offering prompt notice of H5N1 cases”last_img read more

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NEWS SCAN: Smallpox antiviral sought, mass drug dispensing, peanut plant hazards missed, Chinese food safety, cell phone bugs

first_imgMar 6, 2009HHS seeks proposals for smallpox antiviralThe US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a request for proposals (RFP) on its Web site yesterday seeking 1.7 million treatment courses of a smallpox antiviral for the Strategic National Stockpile. The 5-year contract, offered through the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), would cover advanced development of the countermeasure. The contract requires that the smallpox antiviral for adults ages 18 to 64 require no more than 3 doses per day for up to 21 days and have a minimum shelf-life of 36 months. The contract includes options for intravenous and liquid formulations and the capacity to scale up production to make 12 million more courses.[Mar 5 HHS smallpox antiviral RFP]Bank drill to test countermeasure distributionIn one of the first exercises of its kind, banks in two Utah towns will test the logistics of handing out antibiotics or antiviral medications at bank drive-through windows to prepare for an influenza pandemic or bioterrorist attack. The Summit County Health Department is planning the drill, which will take place tomorrow at two Zions Bank branches in Coalville and Kamas, both located about 40 miles east of Salt Lake City. The exercise is funded by a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Cities Readiness Initiative, the Salt Lake Tribune reported yesterday.Private inspector missed problems at Georgia peanut plantA private food safety inspector gave the Peanut Corp. of America’s (PCA’s) Georgia processing plant a “superior” rating after auditing it a year ago, though federal inspectors later found the plant had already been shipping Salmonella-tainted products for months before that, the New York Times reported yesterday. With government inspectors overburdened, many food companies pay for private food-safety inspections, which vary widely in their rigor, the report said. The man who inspected the Georgia plant was not aware that peanuts could harbor Salmonella, the story said.[Mar 5 New York Times report]Texas inspector failed to report unlicensed plant tied to outbreakA Texas agriculture inspector who visited the PCA peanut plant in Plainview, Tex., three times in recent years failed to note that it was operating without a state health department license, according to an Associated Press (AP) report today. The inspector, who was assigned to certify the plant to process organic products, wrongly indicated that the plant was licensed, which allowed it to escape state health inspectors’ notice, the story said. The facility came under investigation as a result of the current nationwide Salmonella outbreak linked to PCA products. Though the outbreak has been blamed mainly on the PCA plant in Georgia, the outbreak strain was found in samples from the Texas facility in February.[Mar 6 AP report]China passes new food safety lawIn response to several tainted food incidents, China on Feb 28 passed a new law that strengthens food safety regulation and boosts penalties for offenders, the Voice of America reported on Mar 2.The new law provides extra compensation for victims of tainted food, bans supervisory agencies from advertising food products, and makes people, such as celebrities, who advertise for tainted products liable for damages. Also, China’s departments of health, agriculture, quality supervision, industry, and commerce will share responsibility for monitoring the country’s food supply.MRSA and other bugs on healthcare workers’ cell phonesMobile phones are a source of nosocomial pathogens, and regularly cleaning the devices could reduce the number of infections in healthcare institutions, according to Turkish researchers who presented their findings today in the Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials. They took samples from the phones of 200 healthcare workers, along with samples from the workers’ hands, and found that 94.5% of the phones were contaminated with bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus strains were isolated from 52% of the phones, of which 37.7% were methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA). Gram-negative strains were isolated from 31.3% of phones, of which 39.5% were ceftazidime resistant. Only 10.5% of healthcare workers said they routinely cleaned their cell phones.[Mar 6 Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob study]Malaria drug looks promising for treating Hendra and Nipah virus infectionsA drug commonly used to prevent and treat malaria looks like a potential tool for blocking infections with Hendra and Nipah viruses, which cause encephalitis in humans, researchers reported in a Mar 4 early online edition of the Journal of Virology. The group, using a nonlethal engineered virus that contained Hendra proteins on its surface, found that chloroquine inhibited the action of a key enzyme, cathepsin L, that is essential for the growth of the two viruses. Researchers noted that chloroquine is inexpensive and has been widely and safely used for more than 50 years.[Mar 4 Journal of Virology abstract]Defunct infection-fighting gene revived after millions of yearsA gene that helps mammals fight infections like tuberculosis and salmonellosis died out very early in primate evolution but was resurrected eons later in the common ancestor of humans and great apes, according to scientists from the University of Washington and the Howard Hughes Medical institute. The gene, called human IRGM, died in the common ancestor of Old World and New World monkey species, but its remnant persisted through millions of years. The gene somehow became functional again in the ancestor of humans and great apes, possibly when a retrovirus inserted itself into the genome, the scientists report in PLoS Genetics.[Mar 5 University of Washington news release][PLoS Genetics article]last_img read more

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H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: No vaccine decision, cases near 6,500, low vaccine demand, flu research

first_imgMay 14, 2009WHO: No decision yet on H1N1 vaccine productionExperts convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) today made no decision on recommending mass production of a vaccine for the novel H1N1 virus, and how soon such a recommendation might come is uncertain, said Dr. Keiji Fukuda of the WHO. “No big decision, no pronouncements,” he told reporters. Calling the issue “enormously complicated,” he said a series of additional meetings will be needed. “It’s not possible to say a decision will be made by this [a specific] date,” he said.[May 14 WHO briefing audio file]Global novel influenza total tops 6,000The global number of novel H1N1 influenza cases reached 6,497 in 33 countries, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported today. The count includes 2,446 cases and 60 deaths in Mexico, 3,352 cases and 3 deaths in the United States as of yesterday, and 8 cases and 1 death in Costa Rica. Other countries with more than a dozen cases include Spain (100), the United Kingdom (71), Panama (29), and France (14).[WHO update 28]US novel flu cases pass 4,000Today the US tally of confirmed H1N1 cases grew to 4,298, of which 3 were fatal, in 47 states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported. North Dakota and Arkansas, with one case each, were added to the list of affected states today.[Current CDC numbers]WHO shortens upcoming World Health AssemblyThe WHO today announced a shortened schedule for the upcoming World Health Assembly. The WHO had been considering the move to allow more time for health ministers to address H1N1 issues in their own countries. The WHA starting date is still May 18, but the meeting will end on May 22 instead of May 27. The agenda includes pandemic preparedness, influenza virus sharing, the International Health Regulations, and WHO budgets and administration.[May 14 WHO statement]Poll finds low demand for potential new flu vaccineA Zogby/University of Texas poll found that only 30% of respondents would get a vaccine for the novel H1N1 outbreak if one was available. Only 18% saw the outbreak as a severe threat, and 96% said they have not curbed their visits to restaurants or malls. Forty percent were confident in the government’s ability to manage the outbreak. Only 36% of respondents said they received a flu immunization for the 2008-09 season. The online poll surveyed 1,442 adults between May 4 and 6.[May 13 Zogby press release]NIH renews support for Baylor flu vaccine researchThe Baylor Institute for Immunology Research recently announced that the National Institutes of Health renewed its grant, worth $14 million over the next 5 years, to design new influenza vaccines. The work involves molecules that target the immune system’s dendritic cells. The institute applied for a grant supplement to make a vaccine against the novel H1N1 virus.[May 11 Baylor press release]last_img read more

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H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: Sick-leave policies, spring-wave protection?, vaccine updates, Web resources

first_imgOct 8, 2009Lack of paid sick leave could spread fluA lack of paid sick leave could force working parents either to report to work sick with flu or to send their children to school sick, at the risk of sacrificing either income or their jobs, ABC News reports. Up to 54 million Americans, many of them self-employed or employees of small businesses, have little or no paid sick leave, an issue that advocates hope to bring before Congress.http://abcnews.go.com/Health/SwineFluNews/unpaid-sick-days-leave-parents-tough-choices-flu/story?id=8775513Oct 7 ABC News reportSpring wave may have given NYC some protectionNew York City and a few other cities that had big H1N1 outbreaks in the spring are seeing little activity now, leading to suggestions that the spring wave spawned a significant level of population immunity, the New York Times reported today. City health officials believe that perhaps 20% to 40% of the population were exposed to the virus in the spring and gained immunity. But city officials and other experts agreed it would be unwise to assume that New Yorkers don’t need the H1N1 vaccine.http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/08/health/08flu.html?ref=healthOct 8 New York Times storyThird of parents may say no to kids’ vaccineConcerned over the new H1N1 vaccine, or unconcerned about the seriousness of the disease, 38% of parents say they are unlikely to permit their children to be vaccinated during school programs planned by many states, according to an Associated Press (AP)-GfK poll. Federal health officials vouched for the vaccine’s safety, urging widespread inoculation. Among concerns are the newness of the vaccine and potential side-effects.Oct 7 AP storyNew Web resources for individuals, familiesThe federal government’s www.flu.gov Web site has two new features, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced yesterday. A self-evaluation section for adults offers a click-through assessment aimed at determining whether flu is or is not present, followed by guidance on self-care, preventing transmission, and warning signs of serious disease. “Flu Myths and Facts” provides accurate refutations of common misconceptions about vaccinations and the disease itself.http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2009pres/10/20091007a.htmlOct 7 HHS news releaseCDC unveils system to gather data on flu-like illnessThe CDC today announced the launch of a system to gather data about influenza-like illness (ILI) from syndromic surveillance systems run by health departments in cooperation with hospital emergency departments. The system, called Distribute, enhances existing flu surveillance by providing more details on geographic- and age-specific trends, the agency said. The system involves a partnership of the CDC with the International Society for Disease Surveillance and the Public Health Informatics Institute.http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5839a5.htmCDC announcement in Oct 9 MMWRCanadian H1N1 vaccination to lag US by weeksCanada’s national campaign to vaccinate residents against the H1N1 flu is likely to begin in early November because attempts to move up the shots’ delivery have not been successful, according to the Canadian Press. The US campaign uses multiple suppliers and began with a roll-out of aerosol vaccine; Canada uses only one manufacturer, and aerosol vaccine is not approved for sale there.Oct 6 Canadian Press reportMichigan man recounts 7-week H1N1 battleA Michigan man who barely survived a battle with the H1N1 virus is expressing support for the vaccination campaign, according to ABC News. Jim Shrode, 53, was in excellent health before he fell ill with the virus in May. He was hospitalized for 7 weeks, required mechanical ventilation, and lost 37 pounds. “People need to know that the risks of the vaccine are minimal compared to the risks if you get ill with it,” he said.http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/surving-swine-flu/story?id=8777207Oct 8 ABC News reportlast_img read more

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Studies reaffirm 2 vaccine doses in kids, show safety in pregnant women

first_imgNov 2, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – Interim clinical trial findings announced today affirm that children younger than 10 need two pandemic H1N1 vaccine doses, and initial findings in pregnant women reveal no safety concerns and a need for only one dose.Federal officials also detailed the role of an independent panel of experts to review vaccine safety data and released a report outlining the government’s vaccine safety monitoring system.At a media briefing today, Bruce Gellin, MD, director of the National Vaccine Program at the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), said federal officials realize that, despite problems with vaccine supply and demand, Americans still have concerns about its safety. He told reporters that an independent expert group charged with reviewing vaccine safety data met for the first time today to become familiar with the data sources they’ll be reviewing.In addition, a federal task force today released a 20-page report that outlines beefed-up systems that officials have put in place to monitor the safety of the vaccine. US health officials are mindful of the 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign, which reached more than 40 million people but was associated with an increase in cases of Guillian-Barre syndrome, a temporary paralytic condition.Though vaccine safety and purifications steps are much more advanced today, officials have added new systems to track the pandemic H1N1 vaccine and are taking extra steps to add transparency to the process, in hopes of reassuring the public.Anne Schuchat, MD, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, told reporters that a cumulative total of 30 million doses of pandemic H1N1 vaccine have been produced for states to order, which represents an increase of 3.4 million since Friday.Vaccine data for childrenThe latest findings of vaccine efficacy in children come on the heels of a recommendation from World Health Organization (WHO) vaccine experts who on Oct 30 recommended that most people, even young children, receive just one dose of the vaccine.Though the group acknowledged they didn’t have much data to base their guidance on, they said countries that have placed children as a high-priority group to receive the vaccine should administer one dose so they can immunize as many children as possible.Anthony Fauci, MD, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the findings today, from National Institutes of Health (NIH) studies, are critical to public health officials who are charged with making policy decisions and to the public for making personal decisions for themselves and their loved ones.He said interim results on vaccine in healthy children ages 6 months to 17 years confirm early results reported on Sep 21. The new findings show that children younger than 10 who receive a second 15-microgram (mcg) dose of pandemic H1N1 vaccine have significant immune response improvement.The new data were obtained 8 to 10 days after the second vaccine dose, compared with the first findings, which were obtained 21 days after the first dose.In the youngest children (6 to 35 months), 100% had a robust immune response after the second dose compared with only 25% after the first dose. In those ages 3 through 9, 94% had a robust immune response after the second dose, compared with 55% after the first dose.Immune responses were comparable in those receiving two 15-mcg doses and in those who got two 30-mcg doses, suggesting that the smaller dose is enough to elicit a strong immune response, according to an NIH press release today.”Our guidelines seem to fit quite nicely with the science,” Fauci said at the news conference. “We would like to get children as fully protected as we can.”Efficacy in pregnant womenIn the initial results on the vaccine in pregnant women, immune response to the pandemic H1N1 shot was similar to that seen in healthy adults.Public health officials have placed pregnant women at the front of the line to receive the vaccine because they have been disproportionately hit by the virus. So far the CDC has received reports of at least 100 pandemic flu infections in pregnant women that required intensive care unit (ICU) treatment, as well as reports of 28 deaths.In a subgroup of 50 pregnant women participating in an NIH clinical trial, a preliminary analysis of blood drawn 21 days after vaccination showed the vaccine was likely protective in 23 of 25 women (92%) who received a single 15-mcg dose and that it was likely protective in 24 of 25 (96%) who received a single 30-mcg dose.The trial began on Sep 9, according to an NIH press release. Participants were between ages 18 and 39 and were in their second or third trimester when they began the study. The ongoing study will also assess the effects of a second dose. Investigators are using Sanofi’s pandemic H1N1 vaccine, which does not contain the preservative thimerosal or an immune-response-boosting adjuvant.Despite the heightened threat of the virus to pregnant women, public health officials worry about the uptake of the pandemic vaccine in this group, because only about 15% of pregnant women typically receive the seasonal vaccine. Safety monitoring of the drug conducted by researchers and an independent expert panel so far suggests that the vaccine is well tolerated, with no safety concerns so far.”For pregnant women, who are among the most vulnerable to serious health problems from 2009 H1N1 infection, these initial results are very reassuring,” Fauci said.Vaccine-safety groupGellin said the independent vaccine safety expert group that met today in its first face-to-face meeting will meet biweekly to review the latest data and will report its findings each month in a publicly accessible conference call with the HHS’s National Vaccine Advisory Committee.The vaccine safety group will be receiving regular briefings from the NIH and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Agency (BARDA) and can convene rapidly if needed.See also:Nov 2 NIH press release on vaccine response in childrenNov 2 NIH press release on vaccine response in pregnant womenFederal Immunization Task Force report on plans for monitoring pandemic H1N1 vaccine safetySep 21 CIDRAP News story “Trial predicts 2 H1N1 shots for young kids, 1 for older”last_img read more

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