Gifford holds 105th Annual Meeting, $27,000 in awards given

first_img*** Gifford Healthcare,Gifford’s Best Kept Secrets’ was the theme of the Randolph hospital’s 105th Annual Meeting of the Corporators held Saturday evening at Gifford. It is also the theme of the medical center’s 2010 year-in-review Annual Report.The report and meeting described the hospital’s efforts around cancer, surgical and emergency care. Talked about were little known programs like the Gifford Adult Day Program in Bethel and inpatient rehabilitation in Randolph, and the availability of high-tech diagnostic imaging.‘‘I didn’t know Gifford did that.’‘ It’s a statement hospital staff and leaders hear regularly, hospital Administrator Joseph Woodin told corporators filling Gifford’s Conference Center. ‘So we put it in the Annual Report. I hope you read it and get the word out.’Also described were the hospital’s 11 consecutive years making its budget and operating margin.‘Our goal has always been an operating margin of 2.5 to 3 percent,’ said Woodin.Others have seen their budget dollars and operating margins swing wildly from highs to lows. Showing Gifford’s financial stability over the past decade, and thus modest but consistent investment, Woodin noted, ‘We actually do work quite differently than other organizations.’Part of its success is due to its planning efforts. The medical center is amid its fourth consecutive three-year strategic plan.‘What does the community need? What do our patients need? What does the hospital need?’ Woodin said the planning process asks and addresses.The current plan aims to make Gifford a medical center of choice for patients, staff and health providers by addressing quality, relationship building and teamwork. Long-term facility planning is another important component, but temporarily on hold due to looming health care reform and budget cuts in Montpelier.Woodin called Vermont a leader in the nation when it came to health care and showed a chart from the Commonwealth Foundation, an independent, non-profit research institute, ranking Vermont top in the United States when it comes to health care.‘In Vermont, we do very well. We’re currently the standard,’ said Woodin, who has testified before the Senate Finance Committee on health care reform. ‘My caution to the politicians is that we’re not trying to go from a C or D grade. We already have an A.’Rather than complete reform, or slashing budget cuts, Woodin proposed cost saving ideas that could be implemented now to reduce health care costs statewide. Not duplicating X-rays or other studies as patients move between community and tertiary care hospitals was one example. Limiting health care advertising was another. A third addressed the hospital budgeting process and savings that could be realized from a two-year budget cycle.Health care reform has been, and will continue to be, a discussion at all hospital Board of Trustees meetings, Chairman Bob Wright said, describing the active board’s monthly meetings and participation in committees. ‘It’s a well-informed board,’ he said, calling Gifford an ‘affective’ and ‘conscientious team.’‘Gifford’s pretty special. I’ve heard this from many different sources and in many different circumstances,’ said Wright.ElectionsWelcomed to that active board was Lincoln Clark of Royalton, a past board member. Clark replaces former Vermont Technical College president Ty Handy who has moved to Florida. Corporators were unanimous in their support for Clark.Also unanimously supported were new corporator members Rod and Marilen Tilt, John and Ruth Lutz, Mona Colton, Carol Bushey and Mike Ross.Awards and scholarshipsA host of awards and scholarships were also announced.Betina Barrett-Gallant, a Gifford employee and daughter of the late Dr. Richard Barrett, named Stockbridge resident and operating room nurse Fern Rogers the winner of this year’s $1,000 Dr. Richard J. Barrett Health Professions Scholarship.The award is given annually by the Medical Staff to an employee or employee’s child pursuing a health career. Rogers is pursuing her registered nurse degree at Vermont Technical College.The Philip D. Levesque Memorial Community Award is given annually to a White River Valley organization involved in the arts, health, community development, education or the environment. Levesque was Gifford’s president and chief executive officer from 1973-1994.This year’s winner of the Levesque award is the Granville Volunteer Fire Department, family physician Dr. Ken Borie announced. The volunteer fire department will use the funds to buy medical equipment to help launch a first response team to medical emergencies in Granville, Hancock and the surrounding area as necessary.And William and Mary Markle Community Foundation grants amounting to nearly $25,000 were given to 14 area organizations, including several food shelves and many children’s recreation programs.This year’s winners, announced Development, Marketing and Public Relations Director Ashley Lincoln, were:â ¢ Bethel Food Shelf ‘ $1,490 to purchase a refrigerator and freezer⠢⠢ Cabot Recreation Dept. ‘ $1,500 for snowshoes and soccer goals⠢⠢ Chelsea Little League Baseball ‘ $1,580 for a pitching machine and pitchers’ screen⠢⠢ Chelsea Recreation Association ‘ $2,000 for summer camp swimming lessons⠢⠢ Gifford Family Center ‘ $1,800 for family educational workshops⠢⠢ Gifford Pharmacy Department ‘ $2,718 for ‘Cactus Smart Sinks’ for the safer disposal of medications⠢⠢ Green Mountain United Way ‘ $1,200 for its Building Healthy Communities activity program⠢⠢ Randolph Area Food Shelf ‘ $2,500 toward its building relocation and renovations⠢⠢ Randolph Elementary School ‘ $1,500 for an industrial-grade food processor for the Farm to School Program⠢⠢ Randolph Village Fire Dept. ‘ $750 for a gas detector for a new pumper truck⠢⠢ Randolph Wrestling Club ‘ $1,500 to create a nonprofit club and program support⠢⠢ Randolph Youth Basketball ‘ $1,575 for a score clock and other program supports⠢⠢ Rochester Public Library ‘ $2,000 in matching dollars toward the purchase of an elevator⠢⠢ South Royalton Community Food Shelf ‘ $2,495 for a freezerâ ¢Formally the Gifford Community Health Grant Program, the grants were renamed for the late Bill Markle and his wife Mary in 2009. Bill Markle had been a former board member and long-time supporter of Gifford. Mary Markle was in attendance, along with about 90 others, at this year’s Annual Meeting when the grants were announced.Gifford has been offering the annual grants to community non-profits for 10 years, amounting to nearly $250,000 given to the community in the last decade, Lincoln noted.Special presentationThe meeting concluded with a special presentation from Gifford’s Surgery Division leaders ‘ Medical Director and general surgeon Dr. Ovleto Ciccarelli, Vice President of Surgery Rebecca O’Berry and nurse manager Jamie Floyd.The trio described the breadth of surgical and specialty services at Gifford, including podiatry, urology, orthopedics, ophthalmology, general surgery, anesthesia, neurology and pain management.‘We’re very unique. Many hospitals of larger size don’t have this amenity,’ Dr. Ciccarelli said of the pain management care provided by specialist Dr. Lan Knoff.O’Berry said that was the beauty of Gifford.‘We never think of ourselves as a small institution. We look at ‘What does the community need?’‘ she said.Urology is an example. There are only 400 urologist in all of the United States and Canada. Gifford currently has two working part-time as well as a full-time, experienced urology physician assistant. And the medical center just recruited a third provider, Dr. Richard Graham, who is slated to start in May.Gifford also offers some specialties in multiple locations for the convenience of patients, including urology, which is in Randolph and White River Junction. Podiatry is in three locations ‘ Berlin, Randolph and Sharon.Specific services were also described along with technology and quality improvements.Floyd called cataract surgery ‘ a simple, quick and needle-free procedure ‘ one of the most ‘life altering’ surgeries. ‘It’s really amazing to walk into an OR with someone who can’t see and to walk out 20 minutes later with someone with nearly 20/20 vision,’ he said.New technology included updated sterilization machines, a new ‘mini c-arm’ for use by primarily Gifford’s podiatrists to get an image or continuous live view of a joint during surgery.Thanks to the generosity of a donor, who gave the hospital $200,000 to purchase a stereotactic breast biopsy system, the hospital will soon add this technology. Stereotactic breast biopsies are less invasive than surgical options and especially beneficial for women with an abnormality near the chest wall.Quality improvements have included a move toward a latex-free operating room, a surgical safety checklist and patient survey, and even new clocks ‘ a small but meaningful change.Previously, clock times varied by several minutes one way or the other. A patient could leave the operating room at say 11:26 a.m. and ‘ remarkably ‘ arrive in recovery suite at 11:24 a.m. Or, they could leave operating room at 11:26 a.m. and not arrive in the recovery suite ‘ just a short distance away ‘ until quite a few minutes later.The new clocks are linked to a central radio transmitter, meaning each reads the same time and patient charts reflect these accurate, consistent times.Source: Gifford www.giffordmed.org(link is external). Photos Gifford Medical Center Administrator Joseph Woodin speaks at Saturday’s 105th Annual Meeting of the Gifford Corporators ‘ a citizen body that helps oversee the hospital, serves as community liaisons and committee members, and elects the Board of Trustees.Kitchen and maintenance teams.Surgery Division Medical Director and general surgeon Dr. Ovleto Ciccarelli describes the vast array of surgery and specialty services available at Gifford.Podiatrist Dr. Paul Smith uses the ‘mini C-arm’ during surgery.last_img read more

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New joint venture to develop 500MW of solar in Ireland

first_imgNew joint venture to develop 500MW of solar in Ireland FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Solar Power Portal:Irish solar developer Shannon Energy is to develop 500MW of solar in Ireland over five years in a joint venture with Danish renewables investor and developer Obton Energy.In interviews on Wednesday morning with sister site PV Tech, both companies confirmed that Ireland’s forthcoming inaugural renewable energy auction scheme spurred the €300 million (£256 million) plan.Gerry Shannon, who runs the Dublin-based company with his brother, explained, “Ireland is fertile ground thanks to the government’s new auction process”. Ready-to-build projects totaling 150MW have already been secured and developed, he said, and the partners intend “to reach further back into the development process and look to secure greenfield sites” over the next five years, too.Details of Ireland’s long-awaited Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS) were unveiled in December. The first, 300GWh, auction is scheduled for the summer. The government has devised the scheme, which will be administered by Ireland’s transmission system operator EirGrid, in order to increase renewables’ share of Ireland’s electricity to 70% by 2030 from about 40% today.Both Shannon and [Anders Marcus, chief executive officer of Obton] confirmed that while energy storage was not included in short-term plans, it is likely to be included in the long-term.Corporate offtakers will also be considered in due course. “Corporate PPAs tend to be shorter term, five or seven years, and we’re going to hold these projects for 30 years, meaning we would prefer to have a longer-agreement,” said Shannon. “In the future, if we can find a corporate PPA or a private PPA that would be suitable for us, then of course we will go ahead and construct, provided that the bank regards to paperwork of such a PPA to be a viable risk.”[Cecilia Keating]More: JV between New Obton and Shannon Energy to spend £256m on 500MW of Irish solarlast_img read more

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Naval Special Warfare Operators Assist Honduran Military in Establishing Elite Maritime Unit

first_img NSWTE-A also focused its efforts on partner nation self-sustainment strategies when seven FEN members were selected as future instructors, shadowing NSW counterparts during all training evolutions. This mentorship provided each Honduran instructor with the competence and confidence to conduct future selection courses and internal sustainment training unilaterally. Outside of the physical and technical training that is associated with a special operator, NSWTE-A focused on creating a team of communication specialists within the FEN to become experts in Harris radio technologies, a skill set that is lacking in most Central American units due to the lack of expertise. During a recent six-month deployment, members of Naval Special Warfare Task Element-Alpha (NSWTE-A), a deployed maneuver element attached to Naval Special Warfare Unit-FOUR (NSWU-4) in support of Special Operations Command South, partnered with their Honduran counterparts to train and increase the military capacity of the newly established Honduran Fuerza Especiales Naval or (FEN). The FEN is a maritime unit of Special Operators capable of combating transnational organized crime in and around their waterways. “The unique task organization, presentation of functional skill sets, and development of unit pride and esprit de corps has effectively paved the way for continued Honduran led training and operations in the future in order to keep their borders secure against transnational organized crime and illicit trafficking,” said the NSWTE-A officer in charge. NSWU4, stationed in Joint Expeditionary Base, Little Creek, Va., and in support of SOCSOUTH, headquartered at Homestead Air Reserve Base, Fla., designed and implemented a comprehensive training and maintenance plan to build the FEN into a strong counter-narcotic force. Organizational departments were also created to include assault, boats, communications, engineering and training with a senior officer and enlisted advisor assigned to each department. To compliment the efforts of the Navy SEALs, members from Naval Special Warfare Special Boat Team 22 also spent a month with counterparts from NSWTE-A training the FEN in basic watercraft maintenance skills and procedures, nautical chart familiarization, boat vectoring and intercepting techniques, small boat handling tactics, and long-range navigation exercises. With a rate of 86 people killed for every 100,000 inhabitants, Honduras is considered one of the most dangerous countries in the world according to statistics from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) report in 2011. center_img By Dialogo February 08, 2013 Some of the conditioning assessments included an eight-mile log physical training event and a six-nautical mile ocean swim across the Bahia de Trujillo. After completing these physical and mental hardships to become a member of the FEN, the 45 qualified individuals continued through more rigorous and operationally-focused skills training, which completed their transformation into a disciplined and dedicated team capable of providing the Honduran Fuerza Naval a capable maritime branch of special operations. Ten operators from SEAL Team 18, attached to NSWU-4, spent six months training and observing the FEN in a multi-disciplinary approach, resulting in 45 highly qualified Honduran Special Operators by the end of the two, eight-week Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/s) style training. These courses were modeled after the BUD/s selection training done by the U.S. Navy SEALs in Coronado, Calif. “In my whole military career, I can only remember three times when radios were used successfully on a mission,” said the FEN’s commanding officer. He added that the skills learned during this training should improve the success rate of radios during military movements. With a murder rate four times higher than Mexico, these alarming numbers depict a nation where violence is part of everyday life. Many of these casualties are linked to narcotics trafficking, where Honduras and other Central American nations are used as a transit point from South America into Mexico and the U.S.; the preponderance of these illicit activities enter the region by maritime. “The combination of SEALs and Special Boat Operators provided the FEN with arguably the best maritime training available within USSOF”, said the NSWTE-A officer in charge. last_img read more

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Thinking of putting your property on Airbnb? Here are five ways to be a hassle-free host

first_imgThis Mermaid Beach property can be leased through Airbnb for $420 per night.IT might sound like an easy way to pocket some extra cash, but opening the door to short-term tenants can be a property owner’s worst nightmare.Listing a property on a short-term rental site such as Airbnb or Stayz can generate income of around $5000 a year for the average Australian host. GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERE This waterfront mansion at Surfers Paradise is available via Airbnb for $878/night.2. GET INSURANCE!Make sure you have short-term rental insurance.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus21 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market21 hours agoUnderstand what makes a valid claim (broken windows, holes in the walls, large stains on the carpet or furniture, large scratches on new floors).Also understand what doesn’t make a valid claim (broken appliances due to normal wear and tear, lost cutlery or crockery — anything of value should be locked away, minor scuff marks). You can book this Surfers Paradise penthouse on Airbnb for $550 per night.3. BE HONESTMake sure your property photography, description, and pricing is accurate and appropriate. While guests expect you to highlight the best points of your property, don’t tell porkies. Nothing guarantees complaints (and bad reviews) faster than overpriced accommodation that looks nothing like the listing. Understand the supply and demand of Airbnb listings in your area for the time you are renting out to set a price that maximises your returns and occupancy. Online short-term rental accommodation service Airbnb. Photo: AFP/Lionel Bonaventure.But it can end up being more of a headache than a helping hand if you fail to read the fine print.Property management company MadeComfy has come up with some tips for potential hosts to understand what’s involved before listing their property online.Here’s how to avoid getting stuck facing huge fines and angry neighbours:1. SCREEN YOUR GUESTS PROPERLYUnderstand the purpose of the visit and make-up of the group. Don’t approve any large groups not suited to your home, check out previous guest reviews, and ensure photo ID for verification. Make sure your guests show courtesy and respect for the property’s permanent neighbours at all times.center_img This Kirra Beach unit can be rented through Airbnb for $194/night.4. ATTENTION TO DETAILIt’s the little things that guests are most likely to remember and recommend about your property. Coffee machine? Make sure the pods are well-stocked. TV and airconditioning? Make sure the remote control batteries work. Unwanted creepy crawlies? Undertake regular, professional pest control. A great guest experience means great reviews for your listing — and that brings more future bookings and enables you to charge a premium. This Balinese beach house in Noosa is available for rent through Stayz.5. MAKE A COMMITMENTRunning an Airbnb property takes time and commitment, so make sure you are in a position to give it both.Unless you can commit your time and headspace 24/7 to running the property, think twice, or get in touch with a property management service that can manage the process for you. RENTERS FLOCK TO BRISBANE ‘BURBS RATES TO REMAIN AT RECORD LOW UNIT PRICE DROPS SLOWlast_img read more

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Danish pensions administrator PKA reports 9% return for 2013

first_imgInvestments at PKA, the DKK195bn (€26.1bn) administrator for five Danish pension funds, generated a 9% return last year, supported by strong returns for quoted equities, the company said.It said the investment return for 2013 was 9%, or DKK13bn, in absolute terms, but added that, including results from the interest-rate hedging portfolio, the return was 4.2%.It said buoyant equity markets in 2013 meant the pension fund’s portfolio of quoted shares contributed positively to the overall return, producing a near-22% profit.Since most of the fund’s equity exposure was passive, it made a return in line with the market return, with very little in costs, PKA said. The fixed income portfolio produced an “extraordinarily good” return of 9% in 2013, according to PKA, which added that this was particularly satisfying in a market environment marked by big price falls as a result of rising yields.Peter Damgaard Jensen, managing director of PKA, said: “PKA has consciously maintained and expanded its exposure to Southern European and Irish bonds, as well as Danish mortgage bonds, and avoided investment in Danish government bonds.”In addition, PKA reduced its sensitivity to interest-rate increases.It had been able to do this because the pension fund was financially sound, Damgaard Jensen said.“We have been able to afford to act long term and be cold as ice,” he said.Absolute return strategies, which had been introduced in the last few years to increase diversification, provided a 13% return last year.Damgaard Jensen said PKA would increase its focus on investments in green investments.“We have had good experiences with the offshore wind farms we have invested in up to now, and we expect to undertake more green investments in 2014,” he said.last_img read more

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Samford Valley’s million dollar views are in demand

first_imgOn 6155sq m, this four-bedroom house at 33 Currell Circuit sold in February.Ms Hutton said demand for properties across the Samford Region varied from house blocks in the village to 40 plus acres, with strong interstate interest.“The buyer of this property was from interstate, but one of the offers came from someone in inner north Brisbane,” she said.Six Samford Valley houses have sold in October, according to CoreLogic data.A six bedroom house at 91 Mount O’Reilly Rd sold for $1.2 million. The house was built in 1990 but feels like a traditional Queenslander.The sale is the second highest for Samford Valley this year, after 33 Currell Circuit sold for $1.75 million in February. The pool at 14 Pinewood Drive.“There was a tremendous response to the house over two open homes,” Ms Hutton said. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus16 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market16 hours agoBedrooms have direct access to the wrap-around verandah.“Everything was just meticulous and its position on Pinewood Drive which is a quiet, family street.” A pictureque Queenslander built in 1990 with views to the Samford Valley.A GRAND Queenslander on more than 8000sq m has sold in the Samford Valley for $1.315 million.Belle Property Samford agent, Leigh Hutton, said multiple offers were made on the five-bedroom house at 14 Pinewood Drive which was being offered for sale for the first time in 15 years.center_img Two hectares of land and this four-bedroom house sold at 20 Mountain View Court on October 3. YOU HAVEN’T MISSED OUT. THERE ARE MORE HOUSES FOR SALE IN SAMFORD VALLEY. CHECK THEM OUT HERE. This six-bedroom house at 91 Mount O’Reilly Rd, Samford Valley is on 3597sq m and sold on October 12.And a four-bedroom house on 2 hectares at 20 Mountain View Court sold for $1,015,000.last_img read more

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Canada doctors wary of cannabis legalization

first_imgMedical Press 15 October 2018Family First Comment:  Diane Kelsall, editor in chief of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, called the October 17 launch “a national, uncontrolled experiment in which the profits of cannabis producers and tax revenues are squarely pitched against the health of Canadians… We cannot expect cannabis firms to restrict their growth ambitions or to have use reduction as a goal. Cannabis companies may initially focus on attracting current consumers from black-market sources, but eventually, to maintain or increase profits, new markets will be developed as is consistent with the usual behaviour of a for-profit company.” Exactly. #PeopleBeforeProfits www.VoteNo.nzCanada’s top medical journal warned Monday that the imminent legalization of cannabis for recreation use poses a major health concern despite broad support for ending the prohibition.Diane Kelsall, editor in chief of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, called the October 17 launch “a national, uncontrolled experiment in which the profits of cannabis producers and tax revenues are squarely pitched against the health of Canadians.”Any increase in pot use “should be viewed as a failure of this legislation” and convince Ottawa to amend the Cannabis Act, she wrote in an editorial in the journal’s online edition.The government defends legalization as intended to get marijuana out of the hands of youths and beyond the control of drug lords.The law has broad popular support, and has generated a booming marijuana industry in anticipation of full legalization, which goes into effect on Wednesday.A survey published Monday found that 70 percent of Canadians support or accept pot legalization. Conducted in early September by Abacus Data, the survey has a 1.79 percent margin of error.READ MORE: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-10-canada-doctors-wary-cannabis-legalization.htmllast_img read more

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Southeastern Career Center gets new director

first_imgSCC Board President and JCD Superintendent Tim Taylor welcomes new SCC Director Derek Marshall.Versailles, Ind. — The Southeastern Career Center Board of Directors has named Derek Marshall as the new director of the center in Versailles. The appointment was announced Monday morning after a thorough interview process.Marshall served as the superintendent of thSCC Board President and JCD Superintendent Tim Taylor presents a retirement plaque to retiring SCC Director Brad Streete Attica Community School Corporation for last six years. He has also been the principal of the Scottsburg High School and the Switzerland County High School.He replaces Brad Street who announced his retirement in the spring of 2017.last_img

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Worrell wins at Shenandoah Virginia Sprint Series opener

first_imgGlenn Worrell was the winner of Saturday’s Virginia Sprint Series opener at Shenandoah Speed­way. (Photo by Jim Haines) Rice was smooth lap after lap while Harris was under pressure from Worrell as his car was start­ing to go away. Worrell went low and got by Rice as Harris found himself dealing with Keeton for third.  Keeton worked on Rice and got by for second but time ran out before he could mount a chal­lenge. Saturday’s feature-only event for IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Cars had Bill Rice and Charlie Ware on the point with Rice out first. Jerald Harris, Worrell and Mike Keeton were all together at the front behind Rice.  By Jim Haines  Laps were winding down and Worrell and Keeton kept the pressure on with Worrell the first to get un­der Rice for the lead as Keeton went to third. SHENANDOAH, Va. (April 13) – Opening night for the Virginia Sprint Series was a pavement race at the beautiful Shenandoah Speedway and when it was over Glenn Worrell was first to the finish line. On Saturday, April 20 it’s off to Hagerstown, Md., Speedway for a co-sanctioned race with the Laurel Highlands Sprint Series that headlines the Open Wheel Easter Eve show. Feature results – 1. Glenn Worrell; 2. Mike Keeton; 3. Bill Rice; 4. Jerald Harris; 5. Chris Ware; 6. Matt Mullins; 7. Charlie Ware; 8. Josh Perreault.last_img read more

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Otter trapping season reaches quota, closes early

first_imgStatewide—The Indiana Department of Natural Resources has closed the river otter trapping season after reaching the statewide quota early today, Feb. 3. The season was scheduled to run from Nov. 15 – March 15, or until the quota of 600 river otter was reached.The framework of Indiana’s river otter season was carefully designed to limit the total harvest. Databases and reporting mechanisms allowed for close monitoring of the total season harvest.In addition to the quota, DNR regulations require that successful trappers register their otter within 24 hours. Regulations also require tagging of each pelt at a river otter check station or by authorized DNR personnel.“Licensed trappers had a successful 2019–20 limited river otter trapping season,” said Geriann Albers, furbearer biologist with the DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife. “While the season has closed, the DNR is continuing to collect data from legally trapped river otter to help guide future management decisions.”A report of the otter season will be available in early 2021. Additional information on river otter and the trapping season can be found at wildlife.IN.gov/8499.htm.last_img read more

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