Watch Bob Weir’s Pristine New Live Video Of Solo Acoustic “Blue Mountain”

first_imgGrateful Dead guitarist Bob Weir recently released his first complete batch of solo songs in over 30 years, and has been celebrating his new album with a countrywide tour. Titled Blue Mountain, the album sees Weir pick up the acoustic guitar and hone in on his cowboy roots. The music is stripped down, feeling comfortable in the well worn pages of Americana.Before Weir embarked on his tour, or even released the new albun, the guitarist held an intimate performance at the McKittrick Hotel in New York, NY. As Weir returns to the Big Apple tonight, he’s shared a brand new video from that intimate celebration of Blue Mountain.In the new clip, Weir takes on the title track, performing a solo acoustic rendition of the beautiful song. Watch him below.Weir is set to perform two nights at the Kings Theatre in Brooklyn, NY beginning tonight, October 14th. Enjoy!last_img read more

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Innovative clusters

first_imgA few visitors got a first glimpse of how Old Quincy House will look after the completion of the renewal process next year, thanks to a tour of a full-scale mockup of the soon-to-be-renovated accommodations. The model, constructed at One Western Ave. by Harvard Planning and Project Management (HPPM), showcases improvements and upgrades to rooms on a typical Old Quincy corridor.“The mockup is an example of a modernized, upgraded space that faithfully preserves the historic character of Old Quincy House,” said Dean Michael D. Smith of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS). “It allows us to test designs and configurations before we move into construction late this spring. Just as the test project is designed to inform a future House renewal effort, the model is designed to inform the test project, and it seems we have a combination of elements that really excites people.”“The general approach is to keep as much of the old building material as possible, if it’s still serviceable and if it will last,” said Mark Johnson (left), Harvard’s vice president for capital planning and project management. Johnson was joined by Steve Needham, HPPM’s senior director of project management, during the tour.The mockup — which consists of a bathroom, a common room, and two bedrooms — represents a cluster community, one of the project’s key components. Although half of the rooms in Old Quincy will continue to be suites of bedrooms and a common room, the rest will come in clusters, featuring a common room shared by 10 to 16 students, who live in single or double bedrooms. Students in the suites and clusters will share hall baths. A small number of the suites will be two-story duplexes with baths.  The primary hall bath configuration will consist of two toilets, two showers, and two sinks in stalls with a high level of privacy that will be shared by 8 to 10 students. Single unisex baths will also be provided for additional privacy and convenience.Harvard College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds said that the new configuration will enable significant improvements in residential life.Two model bedrooms were also featured, both a single and a double (pictured). The renovation maximizes the number of singles available to residents.“The Old Quincy test project is the result of a long conversation with students and faculty about how to renew the House,” Hammonds said. “The cluster arrangement will allow us to eliminate walk-throughs, maximize the number of single rooms, and transform the lower level into common space, all of which will boost quality of life for the House’s undergraduate residents.”Enhanced tutor communities, an important element in Old Quincy’s renewal not included in the mockup, will provide additional cohesion to the clusters. Each tutor will have a similar number of students and live in an apartment that is physically central to his or her  community. Each will have a common room with a fireplace that is a visual center for his or her group.“Tutors reinforce the values and strengths of House life,” Hammonds said. “The test project will improve the clarity and boundaries of their communities, which are a critical component of the learning experience at the College.”Steve Needham, HPPM’s senior director of project management, and Merle Bicknell, assistant dean for FAS physical resources, began their tour in a cluster bathroom. The space included two showers, two sinks, and two toilets with stall doors that ran nearly from floor to ceiling to maximize privacy. The room also sported cubbies for residents’ toiletries.“The cubbies are actually a request of students who participated in the feedback committee we convened,” Bicknell explained. “They won’t be locked, but will give the students a chance to leave their things here. That way, they don’t have to carry wet or soapy items back to their rooms, or leave them lying around the common bathroom space.”The bathrooms include cubbies for toiletries, which was a request made by students.Next door was a model of a cluster common room with large, comfortable chairs and an ornamental fireplace. When the test project is complete, wireless Internet access will flow through the space, and flat-screen TVs will be mounted above mantelpieces, wired for easy connection with students’ Xboxes and PlayStations. Architect Steve Kieran said that these rooms will be the hubs of smaller communities throughout the House.“Each cluster is centered on a shared commons with a fireplace, wall-mounted television, and comfortable lounge furnishings,” Kieran said. “There will be artwork and other things that represent the cluster both here and in the halls.”Just down from the common space were two model bedrooms, a single and a double. Both included sturdy oak dressers, desks, and beds. The single was compact, but not cramped. With both beds on the floor, the double still felt roomy and, with the beds bunked, would be positively spacious. Best of all, Needham said, the rooms’ size and configurations would maximize the number of singles available to residents.“All the seniors and half the juniors will have the opportunity for a single, if they choose,” he said.Sustainability is prominent in the renewal plan, which aims for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. The entire building envelope will be insulated, and the windows replaced to increase conservation and comfort. Mark Johnson, Harvard’s vice president for capital planning and project management, said that the Old Quincy Renewal will also emphasize recycling and reuse. Wood floors will be re-sanded and refinished, rather than replaced. Doors will be resized to fit new entrances. Even the rain that falls on Old Quincy will be captured and used to supply wastewater.“The general approach is to keep as much of the old building material as possible, if it’s still serviceable and if it will last,” said Johnson. “The most sustainable option is always to use existing materials. To the extent that we use new materials, they will be subject to rigorous sustainability review.”Needham said that the improvements to Old Quincy are also sustainable in a different way: They are designed to last. The bathroom finishes and other renovations should be good for 50 to 75 years and should serve generations of students well.“Over time, you’ll change things like the fixtures, faucets, etc.,” Needham said. “But I think that the materials we’ve chosen are very durable. They’re easy to maintain and should stand up to undergraduate use.”Quincy House Co-Masters Lee and Deborah Gehrke came away from the tour feeling excited about the impending renewal project. Although they were impressed with the updates and improvements, they were most pleased that the model still felt like home.“The renewed space had the unmistakable look and feel of Old Quincy,” said Lee Gehrke. “It was very reassuring, and increased our excitement about the project.  We’re looking forward to the ground-breaking ceremony in May!”last_img read more

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Better Together ND aims to foster religious dialogue, community

first_imgWhile Notre Dame is a Catholic university, the students and community members that make up the Notre Dame community are not all of one faith or background. Better Together ND, a leadership program sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns (CSC), aims to foster conversations between people of different religious and humanistic beliefs through workshops and events. “It’s [a] leadership program that trains and prepares students for an environment containing people with multiple intersectionalities,” sophomore and student leader for Better Together ND Meenu Selvan said. “It’s a series of workshops that teaches students how to interact with other leaders from different backgrounds to unite in solidarity for a common cause and to organize.”Director of leadership formation for the CSC Melissa Marley Bonnichsen said the groups are made up of undergraduate and graduate students who meet up to discuss their different life experiences and how they have impacted their beliefs — religious or otherwise. “The groups are open to anyone who [welcomes] interfaith dialogue and collaboration including students who come from any religious experience or non-religious experiences and or who identify as atheist, agnostic or secular humanist,” Marley Bonnichsen said in an email.Senior and student leader Heather DiLallo said the only requirement is the willingness to have a conversation with people who may have vastly different beliefs than what one is used to.“All we ask is that every student has ears to hear what others have to say and respect for the dignity of each person, no matter how different they are from you,” DiLallo said in an email.  Photo courtesy of Melissa Marley Bi Members of Better Together ND gathered for a winter celebration dinner in November. The club has its first spring meeting Thursday.Selvan said she decided to become involved with Better Together ND because she currently serves as the director of faith and service for student government and wanted to improve her ability to work with people who have different beliefs. “I wanted to be equipped with the skills to collaborate with leaders who [represent] individuals with specific faith-based identities,” Selvan said in an email. “I wanted to transform Student Government’s space intended for faith to be more inclusive of interfaith work. Better Together ND has provided me [with] the skills, resources and platform to accomplish this.”Marley Bonnichsen said that amid a divisive political climate in the United States, it is important to focus on what brings us together. “We must be able to get to know people who are different from us, who may agree and disagree and have different lives in order to understand our shared and partnered future together,” she said. “It is in this place that I believe that we can then strive together for the common good regardless of our background or story, race, ethnicity, religion or political alignment … But mutual respect and understanding are necessary and critical first steps in the process if we are to go far together.”Senior and student leader for Better Together ND Isabel Weber said the initiative can help to demonstrate that there are lots of different ways to be religious — or even to simply care about the world at large.“Reaching out to different world view communities helps us create lasting solutions that foster unity rather than division,” Weber said in an email. “I also think Better Together will help people see that faith is not so homogenous here as people might think. Even within Catholicism, there is a wide diversity of faith practices, but that doesn’t mean we can’t work together to help others.”Weber said one of the reasons she decided to get involved with Better Together ND was because her parents are an interreligious couple and she grew up celebrating both the Catholic and Jewish faiths.“I know firsthand how much goodness and love can come from interfaith dialogue,” Weber said in an email. “My parents have so much more that unifies them than makes them different, and I firmly believe that holds true for all humans of all belief systems.”DiLallo said she is part of a minority faith tradition at Notre Dame and that during her time at the University she has learned extensively about Catholicism, but not much about other faiths or beliefs. This, she said, fuels her belief that Better Together ND is an important initiative at Notre Dame today. “This is a great way to start dialogue and help people who may have never deeply interacted with someone outside their own faith background to really learn and grow,” DiLallo said. Marley Bonnichsen said the ultimate objective of Better Together ND has been to facilitate conversations between people of different beliefs, faiths and backgrounds. “This goal highlights the importance of relationships and my hope is that the participants will remember this each time they engage in a larger conversation or debate about what’s happening in our world, that they’ll remember it when they vote, that they will remember it when there is conflict around them and when it seems so hard to understand the others’ point of view,” Bonnichsen said. Better Together ND will be hosting its spring launch meeting Thursday at 5:30 p.m. in the Geddes Hall Coffeehouse. Tags: better together ND, Catholicism, Center for Social Concerns, interreligious dialogue, religionlast_img read more

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Farmland conservation

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaGeorgia citizens like to see fertile farmland and crops near urban areas and are willing to pay to preserve them, according to a University of Georgia survey.“The loss of farmland to urban and related development is an issue of considerable interest in Georgia, especially in rapidly urbanizing counties,” says John Bergstrom, an economist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.Bergstrom is collecting and analyzing Georgia data from a survey that asked citizens what farmland they value and how much they’d pay to help preserve it through the purchase of agricultural conservation (or PACE) programs. The survey was funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Similar surveys were conducted in Ohio and Maine.PACEPACE programs are used to secure farm conservation easements. These easements are agreements between landowners and government agencies or private land trusts to place legal restrictions on the development of agricultural land in return for money to the landowner.Most Georgians in the survey believe the protection of farmland is consistent and compatible to environmental protection and that the family farm should be preserved in Georgia. But they prefer to protect farmland near urban areas. And they want that farmland to look fertile and be used to grow livestock and crops for human consumption.Protection moneyAnd they’d be willing to pay a one-time tax, possibly as a checkoff on state tax returns, to protect this land. According to the survey, Georgians would be willing to contribute $62 per household to preserve 100,000 acres or $81 to preserve as much as 2 million acres.Most survey participants also believe farmers aren’t wealthy.The survey was mailed to 1,000 randomly selected households in Georgia. The response rate was just over 25 percent. Bergstrom said this was a lower response rate than he had anticipated, but high enough to justify the findings.PACE programs can be financed by public and private money. But funds, he said, can be limited. He said this survey can help those administering such programs gauge what farmland citizens want to preserve.Bergstrom is completing a paper about the survey.In 2003, Georgia had about 10.8 million acres of farmland and about 49,000 farms, according to the Georgia Agricultural Statistics Service. In 1954, Georgia had about 24 million acres of farmland and about 165,000 farms.How much a landowner is given per acre to preserve land varies, Bergstrom said. But last month the Athens Land Trust, a private organization, secured $500,000 to buy a conservation easement for 63 acres of farmland in Oconee County, Ga. The funds came from the USDA and the Georgia Greenspace Program. This was the first time Greenspace funds were used to buy such an easement in Georgia.last_img read more

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Column: Coal optimism in Australia hides unease about long-term problems

first_imgColumn: Coal optimism in Australia hides unease about long-term problems FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:BRISBANE—Coal miners supplying Asia’s rapidly growing economies have plenty to be optimistic about as prices and demand appear robust, but they should be wary of getting caught up in the positive feedback loop that nearly destroyed them before.This week’s inaugural Energy Mines and Money conference in Brisbane, the heartland of the industry in top coal exporter Australia, was a sea of optimism about the outlook for the industry. Prices have been on an upward trend since bottoming in 2016 after five years of losses, and miners are once again making good profits amid strong demand from top importers China and India, new consumers such as Pakistan and the reliable veteran buyers like Japan and South Korea.But at the back of the minds of many Australian miners is the fear that they have seen this movie before, and they don’t want the same ending. In 2012, the industry was cock-a-hoop over forecasts that pointed to massive import demand growth in Asia, led by China and India. Problem was it was pretty much all wrong.A well-respected industry consultant and forecaster boldly claimed in early 2012 that China would be importing 1 billion tonnes of coal by 2030, and India would be up to 400 million tonnes. But these forecasts now look hopelessly optimistic, given China’s coal imports were 270.9 million tonnes in 2017. While imports have risen for two years, they are still well below the record 327.2 million tonnes from 2013. While China’s coal imports may rise slightly this year, it’s unlikely they will reach 300 million tonnes, and that 1 billion tonne forecast looks well out of reach.The [new] optimistic forecasts also fail to account for political pressure to move away from coal, not only in China, but increasingly in India. It’s likely that those countries planning on building coal plants powered by imports will also come under mounting pressure from environmental activists, who have become increasingly sophisticated in targeting how coal plants are financed and insured.In fact, if there was another common theme to this week’s conference in Brisbane, it’s that the coal sector still doesn’t fully grasp that array of forces now being deployed against it. The mantra of coal as ‘cheap and reliable and the only way to electrify the masses of people still without power’ was still repeated, and clearly believed.But scratch a little further and miners will tell you of the incredible difficulties in developing projects, with increased government scrutiny and regulation, the rising threat of public opposition and the dearth of financing, notwithstanding a seemingly large pool of investment funds. The inability of India’s Adani to actually start building its Carmichael mine in Queensland, the world’s largest planned mine aimed at supplying the seaborne market, plays on the industry’s mind, as does the virulent public opposition to the mine’s development.More: COLUMN-Resurgent coal exporters should be wary of blinkered optimism: Russelllast_img read more

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Civil Legal Justice Act keeps rolling through the legislature

first_imgCivil Legal Justice Act keeps rolling through the legislature Civil Legal Justice Act keeps rolling through the legislature Clearing another hurdle, the Florida Civil Legal Justice Act — a top priority of The Florida Bar — was unanimously approved by both the House Council for Smarter Government and Health & Human Services Appropriations in late February.Sen. Dudley Goodlette, R-Naples, one of 60 legislative sponsors of CS/HB 491, said the act would help provide civil legal assistance to those who can least afford legal services. The money could be used to help victims of domestic violence, children in civil cases, immigrants, and people who need help obtaining federal benefits. The money could not be used to sue the state or any of its subsidiaries.“I can say to you as a former president of a local bar and a former member of the Board of Governors of The Florida Bar, that delivery of legal services is extremely important in this state,” he told the appropriations committee.Goodlette said it was originally hoped the act could be funded with $10 million in surplus federal dollars earmarked for transitional welfare programs as part of the welfare reform movement, but those funds wound up set aside for other uses as the state faces the budget crisis. Goodlette, however, said $500,000 is available for the act and will likely be earmarked for pilot programs.The council also adopted amendments riding with the bill that would void the act if the money is used for purposes which are found to violate the Florida or federal constitutions, and clarifies that legal assistance and advice for those noncriminal infractions in Chapters 316, 318, 320 and 322 would not be covered by the act. Goodlette noted that includes a prohibition against the money being used to fight DUI charges.Florida is one of only 11 states that provides no state funding for legal aid — something Bar President Terry Russell has made a top priority to change.While a large percentage of Florida lawyers provide pro bono services to the poor every year, those lawyers can’t help everyone, Russell said.Appropriations committee member Rep. Phillip Brutus, D-North Miami, said that, as a small-firm practitioner in South Florida, he runs “a poverty law center without the grants,” because often his clients can’t pay for services rendered. He added that the provision would help lessen that burden shouldered by private practitioners.center_img March 15, 2002 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Vehicle sales slow in October; NAFCU expects sales to remain steady

first_imgThis is placeholder text continue reading » Total vehicle sales slowed in October, falling from 16.3 million annualized units to 16.2 million during the month. NAFCU Chief Economist and Vice President of Research Curt Long noted that although monthly sales levels were down 3.3 percent from the previous year, sales had improved modestly from September if seasonal adjustments are ignored.“Fleet sales continue to be a drag, with TrueCar estimating a 41 percent decline year-over-year in October (fleet sales comprised 15 percent of total sales a year ago),” said Long in a new Macro Data Flash report. “However, gains in the retail segment have been enough to offset those declines.“Low rates are not going anywhere for the foreseeable future, and NAFCU expects vehicle sales to remain steady,” Long added.Sales of cars grew slightly during the month, rising to 3.8 million annualized units. This post is currently collecting data…center_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Daren Wendell runs 100 Marathons in 100 Days

first_imgUS President Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office 100 Days of African Music 100 Days Away: Nigerian President Buhari makes historycenter_img Daren Wendell completed his long distance run on Friday amid cheers from family and fans, in New York City’s Times Square Having run 100 marathons in 100 days. The American completed the fit of running across the United States from coast to coast covering 5,500 Kilometers in the process. The marathon was aimed at raising money and awareness about the need for clean water in parts of Africa. Already,the campaign has raised 130,000 US Dollars,money that will be used to provide clean water to about 2,500 people in EthiopiaRelatedlast_img

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Chelsea favourite to land Napoli’s Mertens

first_img This means he’ll head overseas, and while Monaco are an option, the Premier League seems a more attractive prospect for the veteran. If Dries Mertens does not extend his Napoli contract, it’s reported he’s more likely to join Chelsea rather than Inter, Manchester United, Arsenal or Monaco. Promoted ContentThe Funniest Prankster Grandma And Her GrandsonThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreThese TV Characters Left The Show And It Just Got Better9 Talented Actors Who Are Only Associated With One Role6 Amazing Shows From The 90s That Need A Reboot Right Now6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The Universe7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market ValueTop Tastiest Foods From All Over The World5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do7 Netflix Shows Cancelled Because They Don’t Get The Ratings Loading… center_img The striker will be a free agent at the end of this season and is still considering the proposal of a renewal put forward by Napoli. He would earn more elsewhere, even within Serie A, but the Corriere dello Sport claims Mertens will ultimately reject Inter because he doesn’t want to play against his beloved Partenopei. The Belgium international will turn 33 next month and is Napoli’s joint all-time record goal-scorer, playing at the Stadio San Paolo since 2013.Advertisement Read Also: Chelsea stars agree £10m pay cut amid coronavirus crisis The Corriere dello Sport suggests Chelsea are the favourites, having already approached him during the January transfer window. Further behind in the race are Manchester United and Arsenal. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

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Sign Corner is getting an upgrade

first_imgGreensburg, IN—The construction of a new electronic sign at what will be known as Centennial Park, better known now as the sign corner on Lincoln and Main Streets started on Friday thanks in part to the Greensburg Rotary Club. The electronic sign has been funded by the Greensburg Rotary Club #3437 in District #6580 in honor of 100 years of service to Greensburg and Decatur County. Once completed, the City of Greensburg will oversee the marketing of area events on the sign.last_img

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